ladder method

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by mo, Mar 18, 2006.

  1. mo

    mo Well-Known Member

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    What is the purpose of using the ladder method? I have been reading on the subject for the last 2 hours! I'm not an expert, I'm just someone who likes to shoot and reload every chance I get. What I'm getting out of the info, is to find the best load with the least amount of shots. Am I right? Is this very effective? It looks to be better than the other method (ocw) if your shooting from 2 to 3 hundred yards. Thanks Moe any info will be much appreciated
     
  2. Chawlston

    Chawlston Guest

    It works great and saves powder, primers, bullets and most of all, barrel life.

    James
     

  3. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Well-Known Member

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    Both methods have some merit but are nothing more than a poor man's way to get 50% of the info a good chronograph will tell you.

    By learing how to "read" the chronograph, it will teach you just about every aspect of the "why's" and "how's" of what is going on with your rifle. They tell you way more than just the velo of your bullet.

    This is why one of the most well respected ballisticians of our time said that of all the advancements in firearms over the past century, none are as helpful to the shooter as the development of portable, inexpensive, and accurate chronographs!

    Get one and never look back! Trust me on this one. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif
     
  4. Chawlston

    Chawlston Guest

    I shoot the ladder method over a Oehler 35P and the chronograph just verifies what the ladder method indicates on paper. It is nice to have a backup. So far, all the best loads at 100 were also equally best at 400 and then at 900 as well.

    James
     
  5. BountyHunter

    BountyHunter Writers Guild

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    The ladder is an extremely good method if you have an accurate gun and a chrono and use a modicum of common sense. Ie test in no wind conditions, use good Bench techniques etc. It is fast and reliable way to develop a load in the middle of a tuning node and the chrono is essential IMO.

    The advantage I see, is you can run from the low end to the upper end of the loading spectrum and monitor MV and pressure signs as you go. This is particularily important in wildcats and custom actions where the tendacy is to go past the "book" loads.

    BH
     
  6. jb1000br

    jb1000br Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Both methods have some merit but are nothing more than a poor man's way to get 50% of the info a good chronograph will tell you.

    By learing how to "read" the chronograph, it will teach you just about every aspect of the "why's" and "how's" of what is going on with your rifle. They tell you way more than just the velo of your bullet.

    This is why one of the most well respected ballisticians of our time said that of all the advancements in firearms over the past century, none are as helpful to the shooter as the development of portable, inexpensive, and accurate chronographs!

    Get one and never look back! Trust me on this one. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Care to expand on that?

    Are you picking loads by ES and SD only?

    What Chrono and spacing do you use?

    Thanks,
    JB