How to determine sling length ?

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by pyroducksx3, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. pyroducksx3

    pyroducksx3 Well-Known Member

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    Im looking at purchasing a leather military style sling and have no idea what lenth to get or how to figure out what length I need. They come in 50" 52" 54" 56" 58" Im 6'2" athletic build at 190lbs if that helps ? gun is a rem 700 LA. Any help?
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2011
  2. pyroducksx3

    pyroducksx3 Well-Known Member

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    Re: How to determine sling length

    Well after doing some looking around it looks like I need a 54" or 56" I was originally looking at a leather turner saddlery but found this one Turner Saddlery National Match All Weather Military Shooting Sling 1 1/4" Wide Biothane. It comes in 52" or 56" so looks like 56 it is. Anyone have any expierence with these? and this biothane vs leather? heres a link to the sling Turner Saddlery National Match All Weather Military Shooting Sling 1 1/4" Wide Biothane - MidwayUSA
     

  3. Kevin Thomas

    Kevin Thomas Well-Known Member

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    Pyroducksx3,

    Depends on the gun and it's swivel placement. I need a 54" for my AR Serviced Rifles, but used a 50" or 52" for the M14/M1A. I'd say go with the 52" and you'll probably be okay. The biothane are more durable that the leather, and they don't stretch. They also tend to be pretty "grabby", making them difficult to get in and out of quickly, as the keepers won't slide like the leather will. May be a problem or an asset, depending on your view. I've used both, but have gone back to the leather for now. They both work, but you'll replace leather more frequently. Incidentally, the Turners are first rate, as are the Tamm slings. Brownell's offers what they call a "Competitor" sling (straight M1907 pattern) that's a good bit cheaper, and still a fairly decent sling.

    Quick question for you; have you ever used an M1907 sling before, and do you know how? That's usually a full block of instruction for new shooters who've never used them before. Great tools, but they take some work to get accustomed to. To make proper use of it, you'll likely also need a heavy glove or shooting mit. Come out to a Service Rifle match some time, and you can get a crash course in using them.
     
  4. pyroducksx3

    pyroducksx3 Well-Known Member

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    I have never used these slings before and I understand that there will be practice needed to properly use them. I keep hearing that these are what to use. I need to sling my rifle so I figured now is a good as a time as any. I wont be competing with this rifle but using it for hunting. I would however like to attend a competition. There was an interesting article by a member on here I think it was kiwi nate about using a sling and bag instean of a bipod. I have also read of other shooting positions that utilize this sling to get better stabilization, so it seems more usefull to get one of these vs just a strap to carry my gun with, thank you for the input
     
  5. Kevin Thomas

    Kevin Thomas Well-Known Member

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    Oh, they're rock solid once you get used to them, and in conjunction with a front bag, you'll do better than you likely would off a bench. Still, they do take some work. Remaining in position for the time you likely would in a hunting situation would be a bit of a problem, at least if you're running it like we do in competition. That's why I mentioned the glove. The sling will cut the circulation off to your non-firing hand if you don't have one, and you probably won't want to stay there for more than 25-30 minutes even if you do. I routinely come home black and blue in my shoulder from smallbore matches, and with very little feeling in my left hand. The brusing isn't from recoil, of course, but from how tightly the rifle sits in the pocket of my shoulder. And that's with a heavy shooting jacket. Yeah, they're tight.

    Glen Zediker did a couple little (really, very small!) books about this. One is called Slings & Things, and the other is called Service Rifle Slings. I think they're both available from Midway, but I'm just about sure you can find them at Sinclairs. They deal with slings and their usage, talk about all the different materials, how to set them up (there's several different ways; all work, some better than others). Considering the price of a good M1907 sling like Tam's or Turner's, might be worth your while to take a look at these. At the very least, it'll give you a better idea as to what you're after here. Check 'em out, and don't be afraid to ask questions!