How do you read the WIND without tools???

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by 300rum, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. 300rum

    300rum Well-Known Member

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    Hi again,

    How do you read the wind without tools or equipment?
    Just using your experience and how the grass, animal furr, or the tree branches is moving under the wind!!!

    @ 5 mph - what do you see?
    how about 10, 15, 20 mph?

    Lets share your experience with others.


    Thank you
    300rum
     
  2. 300rum

    300rum Well-Known Member

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    So...
    0-3mph Hardly felton face, causes smoke to drift
    3-5mph Lightly felt on face
    5-8 Keeps tree leaves on constant motion
    8-12 Raises dust and loose paper
    12-15 Causes small tree to sway
    15-20 Causes large trees to sway

    This is how do I use..., I just observe this signs at impact range (as close to animal) and I do the correction on windage.

    How about you guys???
     

  3. col48

    col48 Well-Known Member

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    hi 300RUM
    i use the P P P method.
















    POINT PRAY PULL /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  4. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    My method is to look up and down and around attempting to discern the direction and velocity. I'm pretty good a figuring the direction and am usually within 10 or 12 MPH on the velocity. I then put the cross hair on the target and move it around a bit until I get the feeling that "this otta do it" an trip the trigger. Hey it ususally works, more or less, always a dead deer but sometimes a mess of a field dress.

    That's my story and I'm stickin' to it. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/frown.gif
     
  5. flims

    flims Active Member

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    i took some 24" ribbons 1inch wide and tested with a fan and the kestrel how this would react to the wind. i would stick one near me on a pole and one down range about 400m off me when practicing.
    here are some photos;
    3-4mile hour wind about 35deg
    the meter here shows abit more because i moved closer to the fan while taking photos!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    5mile/hour

    [​IMG]

    6-7mile/hour
    [​IMG]

    8mile/hour/ flat lined ribbon
     
  6. flims

    flims Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    with regard to definitions i found that
    2-3mile/hour is barely felt on face and barely moves your hair and eyelashes.

    4-5is felt on face and if you are looking into it the wind creates just a small bubbling sound in your ear that disturbs slightly.(listen carefully and clean your ears;))
    5-7 you can notice the trees agitating and moving constantly. some of that long grass will start to tip quite at an angle.
    8mile/hour is strong as that of a number 3 on a Fan and will move small plants leaves, move some debree(trap).
    10mph is stronger than the fan and if your hair is abit longish, it will move to one side opposite the wind and bothers your eyes abit if you look into it for a constant moment. the bubbling sound is more prominent in your ears and hanging branches will sway a little.
    11-13mph will start to flat line most flags but this depends on their size so see whats available in your area.
    anything above 13mph should be moving and swaying the trees.
    a 15m/hour wind will start to move those cables we have in the streets. now you have something to refer to but you need to practice. one more thing, when trying to establish wind velocity, it is very important to establish wind direction and if the wind is constant or gusting.!
    for establishing wind direction you would need to turn your head slowly till you feel the wind on both ears, atleast thats the way i do it. i had also tried using one of those small eyedrop containers, make a slightly bigger hole in them and fill it with flour and puff 3 or 4 times to confirm my feeling. you have to find something you can correlate to and jot down some notes.
    you don't need to read winds to +/- 1mile per hour to make hits far out but +/- 3 is important.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2008
  7. long450

    long450 Well-Known Member

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    All good answers!

    There are 2 components to wind and both must be read accurately!

    1> Direction - usually stated in terms of the clock position as it relates to the shooter and the target. Example if the shooter is facing the target and the wind is coming into the shooter, it is considered a 12 o'clock wind and in "simple terms" is "no value" so the shooter can shoot with no right or left adjustment. As the direction of the wind moves around the clock, clockwise to 3 o'clock, it is referred as a "full value" wind and the shooter must compensate for the full value of the speed of the wind.

    2> Speed of the wind, usually stated in miles per hour and is best measured with a meter, but can be "estimated" using some of the methods stated above.

    My opinion is, that given the availability of reasonably priced meters, it is irresponsible to shoot long range animals without this aid. Slight errors in reading direction and speed can result in lost animals.

    Also understand that wind, over long ranges, rarely travels in a single straight line path. You may see one kind of wind at 500 yards and an all together different wind at 700 yards.

    Good luck
     
  8. 300rum

    300rum Well-Known Member

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    Thank you guys.
    few mo. ago i got my kestrel wind reader, and i start using it.
    of course, readind the wind is not easy job... and i have to do a lot of field practice in all conditions.
     
  9. flims

    flims Active Member

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    with all digital cameras around these days you could easily take it out with you and while watching a condition and reading your kestrel, take some clips to correlate a condition to a velocity. you can then save these in your pda for later viewing.
     
  10. long450

    long450 Well-Known Member

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    The Kestrel can give you the wind speed and other weather related data that may impact your bullet path.

    One other word of advice for free and worth every penny is, if at all possible, shoot in the conditions, or simulated as near as possible to the condition you plan to hunt in. Also do not skip a trip out to practice just because it is windy. It is a good time to learn.
     
  11. Inukshuk

    Inukshuk Well-Known Member

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    Get this. It's very good for all you need to know.
    ShooterReady