GreyBull Precision Video Preview

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Don Ward, Aug 12, 2009.

  1. Don Ward

    Don Ward Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Aug 12, 2009
  2. LRSickle

    LRSickle Well-Known Member

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    Great video! Tastefully done. I love it when you see the vapor trail.
     

  3. bigbuck

    bigbuck Well-Known Member

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    +1 LRSickle, I do have one question with the custom turrets how do they make them for one condition and then travel all around at different altitudes and elevation, temp ,baro pressures and the turrets still hit dead on I can't help but say no way can it do that. Maybe someone can shed some light on this subject.
     
  4. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    Very nice job! Made me want to get out and hunt that beautiful country.
     
  5. catch-34

    catch-34 Well-Known Member

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    great video
     
  6. Don Ward

    Don Ward Well-Known Member

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    bigbuck:

    Your question is dead-on. Regardless of what method you use (direct dialing like us, chart dialing MOA, reticle holdover, etc) it's important to know where your bullet is going for that particular shot.

    With our method, the easiest way to account for that is with a drop compensating turret that matches the conditions you are hunting in. Generally, you get 2000'-3000' and 20deg on either side of what your turret is set at before you can see enough impact variance to effect hunting accuracy when using flat calibers and high BC bullets. The actual range, shot conditions & individual ballistic performance can shrink or enlarge that window. Swapping turret dials before a hunt is very easy and requires no rezeroing.

    If you are in a situation where your dial isn't a match for the conditions you are in, it's important to know what your bullet performance is for whatever conditions you face. If an extreme incline, big temp swing, or big altitude change is an issue, the shooter needs to now how to adjust for that. Making that adjustment is no more complicated with a direct dial system than it is with any other system.

    The advantage to a direct dial system is that for about 80% or 90% of the shots we encounter, we can just dial and shoot if the dial we have on is a basic match for the conditions. You can cover a good chunk of the remaining shots with a basic understanding of your rifles performance and some simple "rule of thumb" adjustments.

    For the occasional shot that requires some heavier calculating and maybe a chart reference, a direct dial system doesn't have anything stopping manual adjustments.
     
  7. bigbuck

    bigbuck Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Don for the insite, I use the nightforce software on a ppc for my info I feel like it does not get any more accurate than that, but your way makes a lot of sense to me now . I might try one in the future after all I would have 2 choices then:) or,I really like the idea of not having a ppc to worry about in the field just my kestrel for the wind and range it dial it in and send itgun)
     
  8. 115vld

    115vld Well-Known Member

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    Don I was on yalls website earlier today. I cant wait to get my coppy. I have all of the best of the west series Jon Burns is on and have nothing but respect for him. He is very good at explaining himself and his methods. Im sure yalls new DVD will be outstanding if its anything like the trailer!

    Chase
     
  9. Topshot

    Topshot Well-Known Member

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    Don,

    Nice video, well done.

    I have a couple of questions.

    What sort of shooting sticks or tripod were you using? They seemed very effective.

    Also I noticed that you always dialed past your range setting a few clicks, before going back to the correct setting. Why do you do this?
     
  10. 115vld

    115vld Well-Known Member

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    Topshot,

    I can answer these questions for you.

    The sticks they shoot with are from stoney point. I believe they are called a pole cat. I have shot off some and are excellent for field shooting positions.

    The dialing past the wanted distance is due to "slack" in the internal adjustments. So dialing past then back to the distance will cancel the slack. This is usually just a Leupold issue

    CHase
     
  11. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Don,

    The proof is in the puddin'

    Kudos to the camera man!

    The main reason that "I" would always approach the final turret setting from above is experience with scopes that click from the very early 50s till now. Oh, yea and the bottom end of scope lines. Them was poor days but we was proud.:D
     
  12. 115vld

    115vld Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Roy,

    I have only had Leupold MK4, Nightforce, and S&B and my MK4 is the only one that did that. Some of my friends have the lower end ones but I guess I have not paid attention to whether they dial past and back or not.

    Chase
     
  13. 260shooter

    260shooter Well-Known Member

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    Any idea when the DVD will be out?

    Thanks

    260
     
  14. Don Ward

    Don Ward Well-Known Member

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    As 115 stated the sticks are Stoney Point...with a twist. We build & sell a modified version that lets you snap the rear of the gun into the extra arm coming off the back tripod leg when standing or sitting. It is a quick detach system similar to how the Stoney Point bipod snaps into the forearm. It's more stable than resting the rear of the rifle in the rubber "Y" that is standard.

    As for the dialing past and back, it does eliminate the possibility of backlash or slack as the erector system does it's thing. It's not necessary, but it's one less thing that could go wrong and just an old habit for us. We've tested a lot of scopes and one reason we use Leupold is the durability and repeatability when they get dialed all the time. All the new VX3 scopes (which ours is based on) have the dual spring erector system.

    No set date on the video release but we'll get the word out when it's complete and ready to ship.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2009