First time reloading for accuracy

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by msinsabaugh, Sep 28, 2011.

  1. msinsabaugh

    msinsabaugh Member

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    I’ve just started reloading for accuracy. I’ve got a Savage model 11 in .308. I’ve got some once fired brass so I neck sized it. I used Hornady’s tool to determine the OAL for the bullet to be just touching the rifling and then backed it off by .005”. It was a bit difficult chambering the first round but not excessively so. I assumed that was from not feeding it from the mag.

    I tried to eject the round and the bolt would unlock but did not want to move to the rear. Some stronger tugging on my part and it finally let go. I tried the other two rounds I had loaded up and had similar problems (though not as bad). When I looked at the rounds afterwards I noticed “scuffing” on the bullet. The first round that gave me the most trouble had the most scuffing.

    The Bullets I’m using are Sierra Match King 168gn. I’ve attached a photo.

    If anybody has any ideas I’d be glad to hear them.


    [​IMG]
     
  2. justgoto

    justgoto Well-Known Member

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    If the brass didn't come from that rifle; full-length size it.

    But your bullet looks like it has been in the rifling. Is the scuffing on 4 sides, how many lands are there?

    How much longer is the COL from the suggested COL?

    Is it tight without the bullet?

    I would seat the bullet to the suggested length, then try, (if need be,) with the full-length sized cartridge.
     

  3. msinsabaugh

    msinsabaugh Member

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    The brass came from this rifle
    The scuffing is in that one place only
    My loaded rounds are .042 longer than commercial
    The case is not tight without the bullet
     
  4. backwoods83

    backwoods83 Well-Known Member

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    That's what I call jamming them! Based on a typical savage chamber your .013-.016" in the lands, no worries, they shoot great like that but it will spike your pressure if your at max charge.
     
  5. msinsabaugh

    msinsabaugh Member

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    It sounds as if (since I'm new) I must have messed up using the Hornady OAL gauge and pushed too hard on the bullet. I'll try again tonight. I read on a web page that said I should (since I'm new) try the measurement from scratch 6 or 8 times and write down the measurement each time. Once I get consistant readings I'm in the right area.

    As I'm in the middle of the loading that Hornady has in their book do you all think it would be safe to fire or should I just pull them and do over?
     
  6. backwoods83

    backwoods83 Well-Known Member

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    What powder and charge weight?
     
  7. msinsabaugh

    msinsabaugh Member

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    Since I'm at work I'm not 100% sure but I'm fairly certian that it is 38gn of Varget
     
  8. BuckSnort

    BuckSnort Well-Known Member

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    When you use the Hornady chamber gauge make sure you press the case part of the gauge firmly into the chamber and hold it there while you loosen the lock screw on the rod and slide the bullet up to the lands...

    I do this 5 different times and take an average on the measurement..

    I should also add that it's a good idea to have a clean BBL and chamber for this measurement..
     
  9. msinsabaugh

    msinsabaugh Member

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    More pieces to the puzzle

    I was correct in my previous post. I'm using 38gn of Varget.

    I tried some experiments.

    1) I took one of my once fired cases and I seated the bullte to the same depth as some Hornady BTHP I bought
    The result was the same. It would chamber but the bolt was hard to unlock and pull back and there was a mark near the base of the bullet.
    2) I took a brand new case. Full length resized it (everything I've read says to resize new brass) and seated the bullet to the same depth as the Hornady.
    No problems
    3) I took a brand new case. Full length resized it and seated the bullet to the length my OAL gauge says (-.008).
    No problems at all
    4) I took one of the once fired cases and full length resized it. I seated the bullet to the OAL setting (-.008).
    No problems at all (I then proceeded to do 3 more the same wan and had no problems)
    5) Using a case gauge I checked a) the new case, b) the once fired case full length resized, and c) the once fired case neck sized.
    They all were to spec
    I am now at a loss. Any thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2011
  10. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    Kinda sounds like it is directly related to your neck sizing operation or die (just based off your last experiment). Since the marks are only on one side of the bullet, I would guess that your neck die is making some unconcentric necks.? This could be verified with a concentricity gauge.

    Sounds like FL sized cases do fine with all seating depths, so for now; I'd set the FL die up just to size some of the neck and try that, this might tell you if it's the neck die.

    Hope that helps, gun problems just aint no fun at all!
     
  11. aushunter1

    aushunter1 Member

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    Exactly what I was going to say!!
    Yes it is strange how it only rubbed on the one side so something in your process may be amiss or your dies are not in alignment properly.
    I have just started playing around with floating the die(not locking it down) as from what I have been told by many is that this will centre everything much better & make a more concertristic round.
     
  12. Rem700addict

    Rem700addict Well-Known Member

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    Have you tried taking a once fired case and not neck sizing it and seat a bullet in it making sure to leave it plenty long then carefully chambering the round then eject it and measure the OAL and compare that to the OAL that your getting from your Hornady gauge? Make sure and not put any powder or primer in this round. It should give you an idea of the OAL for your chamber. Just a thought.