Dry Firing?

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by DJSpradley, Jun 5, 2012.

  1. DJSpradley

    DJSpradley Member

    Messages:
    7
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2012
    I hear alot you guys talking about dry firing your rifles to practice trigger control, but some of the people that I learned to shoot from (mostly family) always said to keep dry fires to a bare minimum because it can do damage to your trigger mechanism. Is this true or am I just being to careful with my equipment.

    I have mostly bolt action rifles and one AR-15, would there be more damage done to the trigger of one over the other.

    If it is not going to hurt my rifles I am going to begin practicing more trigger control with dry firing.
     
  2. BlackSS

    BlackSS Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    246
    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Pick up some snap caps if you're concerned, but in general dry firing will not damage modern day firearms if kept within reason.
     

  3. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

    Messages:
    6,848
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2004
    As said, if your concerned get a snap cap.

    The truth is that dry firing is perfectly safe for most modern rifle designs but there are some that should not be dry fired because the firing pin designs are not designed to handle the unsprung stress of dry firing. Those that come to mind are the:

    Win M70
    Mauser (most models)
    Springfield 1903

    This is mostly because of the firing pin design more then anything else. I have not heard to many problems with the AR platforms but a 223 snap cap is pretty cheap insurance.
     
  4. dragman

    dragman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,448
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    IMHO, most rifles are fine the general rule of thumb is NEVER a rim-fire and NEVER a double rifle.
     
  5. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

    Messages:
    6,848
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2004
    Yes while they were not mentioned by the original poster, NEVER DF a rimfire or anything with an external hammers or side by sides as mentioned. You can really screw up a RF chamber QUICKLY by dryfiring.
     
  6. DJSpradley

    DJSpradley Member

    Messages:
    7
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2012
    Thanks for the info... Cleared up a bunch of misconceptions i had
     
  7. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,210
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    Use a snap cap and you'll be fine.

    It's great practice to learn better technique, and to establish the muscle memory necessary for consistent shooting.
     
  8. Zep

    Zep Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    395
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2011
    I had asked a manufacturer a number of years back and they said it was not an issue but they did add "keep in mind, it will put wear on the mechanism just as much as actual firing will". I forgot who I asked but it was a big name company.

    Of note, I had read years ago about an older man who could not get out anymore and he practically wore out a revolver dry firing it while sitting in his easy chair.

    I think dry firing has its place.
     
  9. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,210
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    Snap caps though are cheap, much cheaper than replacing bent and broken firing pins.
     
  10. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    AR's are no problem with the upper attached. Never fire them without the upper attached unless a pad or buffer is used to protect the receiver from being hit by the hammer.
     
  11. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,608
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2010
    ...and, never dry fire a loaded gun.

    That can cause a lot of damage.

    Be safe!
     
  12. codyjoe1128

    codyjoe1128 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    363
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2011
    And don't stick your finger in there.....