Crosshair levelling

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by GunnersChoice, Oct 14, 2012.

  1. GunnersChoice

    GunnersChoice New Member

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    Ive browsed several articles lately where different shooters have been struggling with getting their scope crosshairs level vs the rifle to eliminate canting the rifle. Ive seen various new tools for achieving this with all the levels and custom made jigs all involving using a spirit level etc. Ive been using a simple method for years now to do this and figured I'd share it here.

    Place the rifle in a vice where its certain that the rifle is level in the vertical plane. You could even use the spirit level here but its not really necessary given you have a decent vice.

    Place a 3/4 full glass of water out at about 25-50 yds and use the water in the glass to level the horizontal crosshair while looking through the scope.
    It may take a little tinkering with the gun in the vice to get it on the right level with the glass but its worth the effort. The water in the glass will always find its level and give you a simple yet effective means of setting your scope level.
     
  2. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Sounds good.

    I use to use a plumb bob in the same way that uses the virtical cross hair.

    I now find it easier to use 2 spirit levels, one on the action rails to level the rifle, and one on the
    scope caps. this can be done inside my shop and is very accurate. I have checked the spirit level
    method with a plum bob and it was spot on.

    Even after this is done shooting at different ranger is still nessary to prove everything is in order.

    Thanks for the tip.

    J E CUSTOM
     

  3. Joe King

    Joe King Well-Known Member

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    used to use a plumb bob, now I just have vertical, and horizontal lines drawn on the wall, and a spirit levels for reference when tightening things down.
     
  4. WEATHERBY460

    WEATHERBY460 Well-Known Member

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    I Think the bigger question has to with the gun...where is the best part to get a level reading....scope base??? or a flat spot on the receiver?
     
  5. BMF

    BMF Well-Known Member

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    I use a construction laser that projects a perfectly plumb and level line on any wall. Very easy to see when referencing the cross hairs to it. Plus its portable.
     
  6. BMF

    BMF Well-Known Member

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    I know, I've wondered that too. Plus some action don't have a good flat spot to place a level.
     
  7. REDHEAD

    REDHEAD Well-Known Member

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    I use a builders laser on a wall, and back up as far as possible. Bore site to the verticle laser, making sure the scope axis is centered and aline the verticle cross hair to the verticle laser. A brite colored plumb bob string at distance is good , but I may have a wind issue? I feel the more distance I can get, and the better I can bore site it , the nearer off I would be . I want the elevation to track with the bullet trajectory. The rest is my shooter error. I am beginning to understand why scope levels are usefull when hunting. I can't be more accurate than my tool. lightbulb
     
  8. Joe King

    Joe King Well-Known Member

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  9. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    The action rails above the mag are machined true with the bedding screws and the scope
    base screws. The set of levels that I have are designed for this and fit inside the action
    on the rails.

    I like this because it is consistant and the rifle, scope bases, scope rings and the scope do
    not interfere with its use.

    On a Remington or it's clones there is no other place to place a level properly.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  10. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    There are two unique & separate items to consider with level:
    The elevation adjustment, or the crosshair (if the scope even has one).
    Both are scope leveling to one plan or the other.
    Gun cant itself doesn't matter beyond whatever is comfortable & consistent in use.

    So all this leveling of rails, rings & bases is of no value at all..
     
  11. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Being a machinist, I use LSS Precision Machinery levels in 6" lengths. I put the rifle in a Tipton gun vise with a level on the scope rail/receiver to level it, then I set the scope in the lapped rings and level it with a level across the elevation turret and secure the rings. LSS levels are accurate to 0.005 in 12 ".

    Finally, I attach a side mount spirit level to the tube, insuring the scope is level beforehand.
     
  12. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    Neither scope rail nor turret top directly correspond to either crosshair, or elevation adjustment.

    If you use bipods in the field(you really should) get the swivel models.
    Mount one of these to the scope: Scoplevel Anti Cant Leveling Device
    Of all the fancy levels out there, only this one can be seen straight on, by the shooting eye, from your aiming position.

    Try this;
    Using a gun hold that is comfortable and consistent for you(this will not likely be as mounted in a vise), rotate your scope in loose rings until the top of the elevation turret is spirit level(only a baseline).
    -Now, if you use your reticle for hold-offs, you can use any downrange plumb method mentioned, finely rotate scope for crosshair plumb, tighten rings, turn the ScopLevel to plumb & tighten it. You're done.
    -If you dial your elevation, you might not be done, but at another baseline.
    Shoot a ~40moa plumb line while using your ScopLevel and verify shooting/adjustment is plumb Up & down. If not, you can rotate the ScopLevel that tiny amount to shoot a plumb line. This time you're done.

    Now the ScopLevel, mounted to your scope, is your standard.
    You can move the scope from gun to safe to gun & back, flip up the ScopLevel, shoulder, rotate scope to spirit level, tighten scope rings, find/set your zero.
    That easy from now on -with that scope, having it's ScopLevel previously set.
     
  13. dbhostler

    dbhostler Well-Known Member

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    All of my target stands are square and I level the crosshairs in relation to them when on the bench, but the real test is when I move the elevation 15 to 20 MOA. If the POI won't track a plum verticle line, then something is off. This has to be done in a windless condition of course. You can also check this with windage adjustment, but if verticle is ok, then horizontal should be too.
    db
     
  14. Joe King

    Joe King Well-Known Member

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    you are meaning at 1 set range not over various ranges correct?