Clueless

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by buckhunter50, Oct 25, 2012.

  1. buckhunter50

    buckhunter50 Member

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    Oct 25, 2012
    any ideas for a gunsmith to build a light weight tack driver....ive been viewing lrh forums for a while (non member) ive noticed that a lot of the guns on here are heavy....im looking for a light weight 300 wsm 24inch barrel around 7 pounds....is that possible or would you suggest just buying a 700 or a 70 (really like the looks of the extreme condtions but ive read bad reviews).....i have a a 700 sps 308 just sitting in the safe could be used for an action ( but i hear conflicting stories on sa used for a 300 wsm)...budget would be under $2000....
     
  2. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    There are some fundamental reasons for the heaver barrels. They tend to be easer to find a load
    for(More forgiving) and with long barrels they need to be a little heaver to minimize barrel whip/
    harmonics.

    They are also easier to hold steady in the wind and with a poor position. (Off hand or no rest)

    A light weight rifle can shoot just as well as a heaver rifle as long as it is set up correctly.

    If I build one I recomend a shorter barrel based on the contour and caliber. I use only the
    best barrels (To eliminate the possibility of it being a problem with accuracy)

    Next, I hold the head space to a minimum to avoid cartrige movement in the chamber.
    In fact the lighter rifle needs to be the best a smith can build to minimize the effects of a light
    rifle on harmonics.

    Bedding requirements are somewhat different for the light rifle also.

    Reloading is essential if you want accuracy. The odds of finding factory ammo that it will like
    are slim to none.

    I personally dont like to use anything less than a # 5 or #6 contour and save weight by using
    a lighter scope and mounts. 14x plus scopes can weigh up to 4&1/2 pounds all the way down to
    less than 2 pounds. (These are not the cheeper scopes that cut corners).

    Barrels are the last place I want to shave weight when there are other ways that will not
    effect accuracy.

    Don't base a rifles weight on what you like as much as on its intended use.

    Just my opinion

    J E CUSTOM
     

  3. Edd

    Edd Well-Known Member

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    Would you explain this.
     
  4. sib1948

    sib1948 Active Member

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    Jul 3, 2012
    Check out RW Snyder Gunsmithing in Iowa. I purchased one of his used Custom Rem 700r 308 rifles on Snipers Hide Forum and he has been very responsive and helpful. He has Custom Rem 700r's starting at $1500 and you can add the goodies for additional fees. Tack driver- shoots better than me.
     
  5. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Jul 29, 2004
    No problem.

    The light weight barrels sometimes require the bedding to be 1/2 to 1'' beyond the recoil pad
    to help support the barrel and dampen the harmonics.

    This is the reason that some sporter rifles have tip pressure near the end of the fore end.
    I dont like tip pressure because as the barrel heats up the zero starts to move. So if this is
    the case with a light contour I like to place a band of bedding about 1'' wide with no pressure
    on the barrel but in contact with it, this realy helps the barrel deal with the harmonics. I
    have also placed 2 screws near the fore end 90o from each other for adjustable tip pressure
    on the barrel.

    On heavy barrels a good pillar bed and full float is all that is normally needed.

    Each rifle reacts differently and should be addressed accordingly to get the optimum
    performance from it.

    Just like the bedding of different actions requires different techniques, barrels of different
    lengths and contours require some different bedding.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  6. deadlift

    deadlift Official LRH Sponsor

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    Dec 18, 2011
    For a 7lb rifle with out the scope, you can run a fluted #4 and finish between 24-26". If you wanna go with a 7lb scoped rifle then you need a #3 fluted finishing 24". The reason to go with fluting is so you can run the biggest dia barrel with the least amount of weight.
    Chris
    Benchmark Barrels
     
  7. Moman

    Moman Well-Known Member

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    Here's one of many ideas for you. I have a 700 in 300 WM. The bbl is 25", it's the Broughton 5C in a 4.1 contour. Most of the weight is in the barrel. It is stocked with a McMillan Edge Remington Sporter stock, and wears a Leupold VX-III 4.5x14x40. If I remember right, the overall weight is right about 7-3/4 lb. You can easily carry this gun all day long and I have shot deer to 765 yds accurately. The gun will shoot further but I've always felt this was a safe distance to accurately take game. Heavier guns will be more accurate at longer ranges. Hope this helps.
     
  8. buckhunter50

    buckhunter50 Member

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    Oct 25, 2012
    Je custom....ado you have a website or any pics=tures of your work?