Cerakote

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Alibiiv, Apr 23, 2014.

  1. Alibiiv

    Alibiiv Member

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    I recently sent my .308 Browning lever action to JES Reboring and had it rebored to .358 Winchester, I have a Maine black bear hunt I would like to do with the gun. The rifle seems to have some minor pitting on the left side of the receiver, and I am thinking about applying a new finish called Cerakote on the rifle. I can get the blemishes out of the receiver myself before it goes out. Does anyone on here have any information or experience with this finish. All of the testing that I have read shows it to be pretty durable, just not sure about if it is going to do what I want it to do. Any help, info or input would be much appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. coyotekiller82

    coyotekiller82 Well-Known Member

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    I've never heard any negative comments regarding the product itself.

    If the product is applied correctly you should have a long lasting durable coating to protect your rifle for decades to come!!
     

  3. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    CeraKote is hardly a "new" finish. It's been the 'go to' coating for the serious for several years now. No coating/finish is indestructable, but this stuff, when applied properly, is pretty close. It can be 'scratched' and sharp edges may exhibit some wear over time. I've been using it, successfully, for the last 3-4 years (the bake-on formula, don't know about the 'air dry').
     
  4. Alibiiv

    Alibiiv Member

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    Thanks for your input. I am on the "maturer side", so for me Cerakote is new stuff, I am used to high polish blued finishes, or packerizing finishes. I have read about the stuff, but never seriously thought about putting it on one of my rifles. Based upon the responses, I am going to have the rifle done. I have a friend who just did a 1911 in the graphite black color and he is very happy with the finish too. The process involves bead blasting and then applying the coating and then baking it. Thank you for your responses and input; much appreciated.
     
  5. Dosh

    Dosh Well-Known Member

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    Had a rifle done in 2010 by A Coatings of Az. I hunt with it yearly, there is not a scratch on it. This was the baked on version.
     
  6. Alibiiv

    Alibiiv Member

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    Hello Dosh,

    Thanks for your input, it is much appreciated. Just curious about the color that you chose. I pretty much have decided on graphite black, will make the decision when I get to the place that is doing the work. It is a BLR and would like to have it look fairly nice, but still want to protect the rifle.
     
  7. c_bass16

    c_bass16 Well-Known Member

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    All their colors are nice, just kinda depends on the stock.

    Black stock...black metal is timeless. or go with some matte silver like titanium. etc etc etc.

    Myself. Since it's getting coated anyway...I prefer more natural colors. They don't stick out quite as much.

    These are two similar colors in a two tone, and the stock was dipped.
    With Cerakote on the metal work...the possibilities are endless.

    The barrel and action are Smiths Brown. The suppressor, bolt, rail and bottom metal are Federal Standard Field Drab.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Alibiiv

    Alibiiv Member

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    That is a very fine rifle. I really do like the colors and the way that they blend together. I was thinking the graphite black because it had a slight sheen to it, yet a little on the flat side and not too shiny. The rifle is a BLR with a wooden stock. I am anxious to get it done, but I am going to make sure that in not only shoots good, but looks good as well. I just ordered a set of 30mm Werner rings and bases and plan on having those done as well. Thanks for sharing the photos of your rifle, really a neat look firearm.
     
  9. Dosh

    Dosh Well-Known Member

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    Alibiiv, Coyote Tan, barrel, action, bolt, bottom metal, scope rings and all screws. Charged me $160 but that was 4 years ago.
     
  10. Alibiiv

    Alibiiv Member

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    $160 seems like a reasonable price. I think the dealer is getting $190 for a bolt action right now. I got a price of $200 for the BLR, the guy said he had never done one before and felt it would be a bit more work doing the lever action over the bolt action. From where I am sitting I can see a bit more detail work with the lever gun than the bolt gun. From what I was told they bead blast everything before they do anything and then degrease at a high temperature, then spray and then bake the finish on.It sound like a lot of work and for me the price is not too far off of the wall for all the work that has to go into the process.

    The dealer has a great web site, it is DFI Tactical Coatings, in Johnston, R.I.. I live in Rhode Island, and they don't have any brown bears in this neck of the woods either, not even in a zoo. I have a friend who is in the knife making guild, and he has used him for a few things and he likes the product, the durability and the turnover is quick and he said the owner is a good person to do business with.

    I would like to thank everyone for all of their input on this project. I have been a member for a while now and have never used the site for postings. I am glad that I joined this has been great. Thanks!
     
  11. c_bass16

    c_bass16 Well-Known Member

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    I've done 10-12 guns so far and would say that $200 is very fair for a full rifle. $160 is a steal.

    I do them for a minimum $200 depending on work needed for tear down and prep. $50+ for each additional color.
    Most jobs are in the $250 range. Camo patterns can run 3-400
     
  12. Alibiiv

    Alibiiv Member

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    Thanks for that information, I started out writing this post as a "new" finish, because it is and I have no idea about expense or anything else. Sometimes learning as you go is a good thing, but that type of learning can get expensive and then we do not get what we had planned on getting. I am doing the dis-assembly work myself, this company said that they get $50 for dis-assembly work also. I have a little bit of pitting or blemishing on the right side of the receiver that I want to get rid of, and probably will try sanding or bead blasting that out myself. I have some pretty good equipment, just need to get the finish put on. Thanks
     
  13. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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