Blueprinting an action- what is it

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by RustyRick, Sep 29, 2013.

  1. RustyRick

    RustyRick Well-Known Member

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    What is meant by blueprinting and what are the benefits.
     
  2. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

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    "blue printing", is in a nutshell, taking a mass produced factory action and re machining it to the dimensions it should have been when when it left the factory, according to the blue print.

    The benefit is that all parts are square and true to one and other ie. action, barrel etc. It insures consistency and intern that consistency equates to increased accuracy.
     

  3. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    You'll find lots of information if you use the Forum Search function and search for the word 'blueprint' (I found 343 Posts) and the word 'blueprinting' (414 Posts).
     
  4. jimbires

    jimbires Well-Known Member

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    Kevin Cram , has a couple excellent you tube videos . Jim



    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGn9qWJIM9M]Remington Action Blueprint 1 - YouTube[/ame]


    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmMSeBAGV0M]Remington Action Blueprint 2 - YouTube[/ame]
     
  5. Sully2

    Sully2 Well-Known Member

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    You hit it dead on the head!
     
  6. RustyRick

    RustyRick Well-Known Member

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    WOW oh WOW - I had no idea that in an industry like this, that QC could go so far wrong.

    Thanks for the insight.
     
  7. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Its not that they are so bad, just that they don't try to achieve perfection and have to keep the
    cost down to be competitive. lots of People want cheep prices and for this they get poor quality
    and minimum Quality Control.

    Most good Gun Smiths want everything to be as near perfect as possible because they are held to
    an accuracy standard and by doing rifles one at a time can reach there requirements.

    I have blueprinted lots of factory actions that needed very little truing, but some needed everything
    trued, so I true/Blue print every action I build on as part of the process.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  8. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    Life is too short to have inaccurate guns. :cool:

    gun)
     
  9. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    A-MEN to that !!!!!

    That is why all parts including the action have to be checked and assembled in a craftsman ship
    like manner .

    If you eliminate every possible issue the rifle will be accurate if you feed it good ammo and have the skills to shoot well.

    Assume nothing and check everything, No matter who makes it.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  10. bigben

    bigben Active Member

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    Not many realize how small .001 is in reality. The average human hair is .004 so that should put it in perspective for you. To achieve the accuracy he is portraying in those videos a remington 700 would cost what a custom gun does from the factory. Typical tolerancing on most machining operations are +\- .005. So even from the factory it may be within their standard of tolerancing. But isnt perfect. Indicating to .0001 is extremely tight. I enjoyed the videos and it really showed me a lot. I am a cnc machinist and have respect for the fella in the video. Not many know how hard it is to work within a .001.