30 or 45 degree

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by craigf, Mar 24, 2012.

  1. craigf

    craigf Well-Known Member

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    Quick question, when chamfering a case neck, is there a preference in the degree I use? I see there are 30 or 45 degree deburring tools. I not sure whether it was personal preference, cal. specific, or case specific. Thanks for the input. Craig
     
  2. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    I use a well worn taper pin reamer, believe it or not! Probably around 20 degrees total taper in it, and cuts like a razor blade.
    gary
     

  3. craigf

    craigf Well-Known Member

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    I use a well worn taper pin reamer, believe it or not! Probably around 20 degrees total taper in it, and cuts like a razor blade.
    gary

    Gary, so is it your opinion that the degree of taper is personal preference, or do you use different tapers for different applications? Thanks for the input.
    Craig
     
  4. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    I don't think the angle is as important as the amount of chamfer.

    Two much chamfer will thin the case mouth and cause premature splitting.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  5. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    I maybe all wet for posting this, but here goes anyway.

    I went with the taper pin reamer before anybody came out with the narrower deburr tools. I needed something to help me start boat tail bullets a little better and saw the reamer laying in front of me. I have used the 45 degree and the 30 degree as well, but I sorta happened upon something that made me stay with the taper pin reamer. I was sorta courious about the doghnut forming at the base of the neck, so I cut up a couple cases that I had prepped with a 45 degree tool. I checked the end of the neck where the deburr tool cleaned up the neck. There was an additional burr created by that tool, but a few thousandths into the neck. I did the samething with a 30 degree cutter and it was better. I then did three cases with the taper pin reamer and cut them up. There was little if any burr left to deal with. All I had to do was wipe the case with that reamer. Also the taper pin reamer is closer to match the boat tailed end of a bullet by eyesight. Does it help? I don't know for sure, but at least that little burr is not on my mind anymore
    gary
     
  6. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    One thing I did a little later was to take an india stone and really dull up the reamer. I think it helped me control the amount of brass I cut. (it will take a little bit of practice to develop a method). As for getting one, don't buy a new one! Look for somebody that has some junk ones (i use three different ones that are cut off to my needs). They will often break off the small end, and just get a new one. Just remember these things will cut brass like a razor blade going thru butter, and will leave no shadow or a raised edge at the end of the cut.
    gary
     
  7. craigf

    craigf Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies. The narrower reamer makes a lot of sense. I have a wilson trimmer on it's way and will use the 30 degree tool to get the ball rolling. Thanks for the help, Craig