224 Clark

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Bob the nailer, Apr 23, 2010.

  1. Bob the nailer

    Bob the nailer Well-Known Member

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    Anyone know about barrle life with this cartridage? I've read 1200 rounds and still going (wildcat cartridges book). Is the longer neck a plus in more barrel life, been trying to decide between 22-243 Middlested, 22-284, 22 Vias... now I find the 22-257 Improved (224 Clark) when my 22-250 throat goes I want something diffrent to chamber in.


    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. LewisH

    LewisH Well-Known Member

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    Bob, I've had and extensively used the following: 22-250AI, 22-243 Middlested, 220 Rocket, 220Swift, 22BR, 6mmBR, 243 and 243 AI, and I have come to the following conclusions:

    All but the BRs can be shot out very quickly in a few hundred rounds. So keep 'em clean and cool, and hope for the best.

    After a while the wildcats just aren't worth the bother, unless you really still enjoy fussing with them.

    I'd rebarrel the .22 to .22-250 or maybe .220 Swift, and just go shooting.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2010

  3. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    Ya' just can't change the laws of physics, over bore cartridges = throat erosion. Seems to me, the only place those .22-243 wildcats shine is with heavy for caliber bullets at 3200/3400fps. Someone said, "speed fades, B.C.s go on for ever". The .22-243 Win. (simply the .243 case necked to .22) is quit popular here, on the Southern Plains. Heavy bullets are the ticket at those slower velocities. Cases are easy to make and don't have to be fire formed like the Middlestead does. Barrels last in the 1500-1800 round range depending on your load, how maticulous you are about cleaning, and how hot (temp wise) you get the barrel. If, when you have the barrel installed, your gunsmith opens up the feed port to the rear for an extended mag box you will have room to set your bullets out further as the throat wears and get some more rounds down the tube accurately. 55g. bullets at 3800-4000fps will wash out a throat in no time.
     
  4. TR220swift

    TR220swift Active Member

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    I am ordering a 22-243 win on monday, going to get a 28'' Douglas, went with the plain 22-243 just because it has less fuss than the others, 1-8 twist hoping for 75gr Amax, should make an Antelope pretty dead this fall. Good Luck! Let us know what you go with.
     
  5. Bob the nailer

    Bob the nailer Well-Known Member

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    All good advice, maybe I will just set back the chamber and keep the 22-250 when the throat goes. I am pushing 3600+ fps with 52grainers, just that those wild cats look so inviteing.

    I can always pull out the big 6's (6mm-284) when a longer shot is needed.


    Thanks
     
  6. Kevin Thomas

    Kevin Thomas Well-Known Member

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    Bob,

    You've already gotten some of the answers here, but there's one other warning that I'd throw out here; the Clark made its reputation with the heavy weight bullets, and that's what it was originally intended for. That's fine and dandy, and with a good heavy weight match bullet, it'll do wonderful things at long range. However, heavy bullets are harder on barrels than lighter ones, even if you're dropping the velocities and pressures accordingly. I'd say the 1,200 round figure you originally cited here is pretty optimistic, and would be happy (thrilled, in fact) to hit the thousand round mark with this combination. Always heard the old adage that"speed costs money; how fast you wanna go?" I'd amend that a bit to include distance, as in "long range costs money, how far you wanna shoot?"

    Kevin Thomas
    Lapua USA
     
  7. Varmint Hunter

    Varmint Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I shot my 22-243AI, 8 twist, more than a thousand rounds before I decided to set the barrel back. I rechambered it in 22-243 (plain) just to avoid fireforming cases to the AI configuration. Unless you have a fast twist 22-250 I wouldn't bother with the big cases. You gain very little useful ballistic advantage shooting the light bullets in the big cases.

    If you just want to have some fun with the remaining barrel life, than by all means try the 22-243, 22-6mm, 22-284 or similar; you'll have blast!
     
  8. Bob the nailer

    Bob the nailer Well-Known Member

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    Ok so I'm ready for the replys. I had some 284Win. brass and went ahead with form and F.L. dies and necked them down to 22-284. After turning the necks to .014" then annealing I again sized the necks for uniformity, starting loads anyone and other than Quick Load data real range results would be great!

    I picked up the dies and chamber reamer at close out prices....I couldn't resist.

    :D
     
  9. LewisH

    LewisH Well-Known Member

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  10. Bob the nailer

    Bob the nailer Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the link, very informative.
     
  11. CUTTER1

    CUTTER1 Active Member

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    Interesting that I've built four .224 Durham Jet rifles dating back to the 70's and all but the last one got 3500 rounds before accuracy deteriorated where they wouldn't 3/4" or better 5 shot at 100 yds.
    always built with Douglas air gage varmint wt barrel in 10' twist. mostly shooting 60 gr Hornady HP
    with 40gr of IMR 4831! Current rifle has a Benchmark barrel and has 2500 rds and shoots one hole if I do my part with Berger 64gr match Varmint! I clean every 50Rds shooting Prairie dogs and try not to get the barrel to hot to handle! This case is a 243 with shoulder set back 60thousandths to make neck longer and fireform to 40 degree shoulder! works great here in WY wind without pulling out a 6mm or 25!
     
  12. THBear

    THBear New Member

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    I read with interest the comments about the 224 Clark and other Super 22’s.
    Low many years ago I owned a gun shop in Florida and just had a passion for 22cf rifles. Since my policy to my employees was, no 22cf could be sold until I decided to keep it of put it in stock, I ended up with a fine collection of them. If memory serves be correctly I once owned 28 22cf rifles at the same time, and a few 17’s. Never met one I didn’t like.
    Having spent my lean collage years in Middle Tennessee when money was used for gasoline, girls, and cartridges, I provided most of my food by shooting it, typically rabbits, squirrels, frogs and groundhogs, depending on the season.
    I began my groundhog hunting on a large farm out of Tuckers Crossroads with a Marlin 39, but soon moved up to the centerfires. Years later the lure to be in those green pastures was still embedded in my soul.
    In the early 70’s every spring would find me in Middle Tennessee for a couple of weeks to reconnect with old girlfriends and to hunt groundhogs.
    My main gun by then was the 220 Swift and to this day should I be compelled to own only one gun and forsake all others for any and all occasions, that gun would be a 220 Swift. However, there was this one ole whistler who had dug his den right slap-dab in the middle of a huge pasture and there was no way I could within 500 yards for him without being spotted and him diving for the refuge of his hole. I sent numerous 52 grain HPBT’s at the fellow but never could I even scare him.
    Then I read an article in, I believe, Shooting Times about the 224 Clark. ‘Could this be my answer for that untouchable ole hog?’
    I contacted Kenneth Clark and while talking with him he convinced me to send a 03A3 I had taken in trade which was already sporterized with a fine tiger stripped walnut stock.
    Mr. Clark installed and free floated one of his barrels, and when the rifle returned with it were two boxes, one with his 80 grain varmint bullet and the other his game bullet, which I seem to remember was 82 grains. Also there was a short handwritten note with suggestions of 5 loads of various powders and powder contents.
    Using the first of his suggestions I loaded 10 rounds, 5 with the varmint bullet and 5 with the game bullet and went to the old police range behind the airport. The first 5 shot at 100 yards produced literally a single enlarged hole. The next five using the game bullet spread to about ¾ of an inch. I never tried any other load after that. A few years ago I had this round chronographed and it consistently produced in and around 3500fps from my 24inch barrel.
    That spring I took my 224 Clark to that Tuckers Crossroads farm and killed the ole boy with my first shot at 500 long paces.
    I have no idea how many rounds I have fired through that rifle, but apparently not too many as it never lost its accuracy. I do know I had a new 284 Winchester that did after only about 200 shots with factory rounds so I don’t believe the 224 Clark is near the overbore of many of our most popular so called ‘Magnum’ factory cartridges.
    No brag, just fact.
    Should I ever find it’s beginning to spread its shots I buy another in 224 Clark, not try and rechamber it to something else.
     
  13. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

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    I enjoyed the story-we passed his shop on the way to my grandparents house. I finally got an uncle to drive me there. It remains a mythical place In my mind. In a family of non-shooters here was a guy that lived it. Patient with kids slobbering on his glass cases. I owe myself a .224 Clark someday. Congratulations on yours.
     
  14. THBear

    THBear New Member

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    Yes you do.