Zero at 100 Yards and Leave Turret at 200 Yards for Hunting?

clark33

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Never said anything about accuracy. Either method would not be more or less accurate.. just different adjustment. Just put in .02 for what works for me based on the OP question. Wasn’t trying to start a ****ing match with you... Calm down man, haha. I just can’t wrap my head around setting your ‘zero’ at 100, just to re-set an adjusted zero to keep at 200... Does it really matter? no. Do what works for you, and stop “beating your head against the wall,” worrying about what I do. I just like the K.I.S.S. Method in the field with a 200-yd zero.

Lol again, the reason for a 100 yard zero then dialing your walk around “field” zero when you’re at your location is because that adjustment you make to get to 200 or 300 will vary day to day, location to location. Your 100 yard zero will not, at least not enough to notice or compound error over distance. Example. In Idaho this year with my 100ud zero it took .3 mils to get to 200, in Wyoming a month earlier it took .2 mils. Now that’s not much, but if I just zeroed it at 200 where I live and then took off hunting it could potentially be .2 mils off or .4 mils off just based on different humidity, density altitude, temp etc. so if I’m starting off with a zero that’s potentially .2 to whatever mils off, that error will compound when I dial at distance, potentially enough to make a poor shot. It’s not rocket science, and zeroing at 100 would be the K.I.S.S. of all K.I.S.S.

IF you plan on dialing your elevation it’s advised to zero at 100. If you prefer to zero at 200 or 300so you can hold center mass, great, but dialing past that at any substantial distance will be subject to error and god forbid a wounded animal.
 
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Lobber

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Lol again, the reason for a 100 yard zero then dialing your walk around “field” zero when you’re at your location is because that adjustment you make to get to 200 or 300 will vary day to day, location to location. Your 100 yard zero will not, at least not enough to notice or compound error over distance. Example. In Idaho this year with my 100ud zero it took .3 mils to get to 200, in Wyoming a month earlier it took .2 mils. Now that’s not much, but if I just zeroed it at 200 where I live and then took off hunting it could potentially be .2 mils off or .4 mils off just based on different humidity, density altitude, temp etc. so if I’m starting off with a zero that’s potentially .2 to whatever mils off, that error will compound when I dial at distance, potentially enough to make a poor shot. It’s not rocket science, and zeroing at 100 would be the K.I.S.S. of all K.I.S.S.

IF you plan on dialing your elevation it’s advised to zero at 100. If you prefer to zero at 200 or 300so you can hold center mass, great, but dialing past that at any substantial distance will be subject to error and god forbid a wounded animal.


Lol, just can’t help yourself, can you? Again, was never trying to argue, but you continue to come back and tell me I’m wrong. Do your thing, and I’ll continue to do what has yet to fail me. At the end of the day, know your rifle’s ballistics based on your preference for zero, whether you set it at 100yds, or 1000... there simply is not a wrong way IF you know the ballistics of your rifle.

Good evening to ya and sorry for peeing in your cheerios, or whatever it is you think I did.
 

clark33

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I’m not up set bud, no need for that. Just trying to encourage people to research and listen to what the professionals are teaching. Sorry I questioned your methods when no one who makes a living training long range shooters advises what you and a few others are preaching. It’s not personal
 

Lobber

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Sorry I questioned your methods when no one who makes a living training long range shooters advises what you and a few others are preaching.

So is it safe to assume you are one of these trainers making a living training long range shooters? Good on ya, if you are!

You should also notice I’m not ‘preaching’ any method... I briefly explained what I do, but never stated as the right or only way. The fact this ever morphed onto any sort of argument is beyond me... anyways, have a good night, preacher man.
 

remingtonman_25_06

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Well I'll be damned, I must be doing everything wrong then this whole time!! I've killed animals out to 1150 yards with my 300y zero and dialing, but dont tell them that, cause its wrong ya know... I can go out anyday of the year and ring my 1K gong, again with my 300y zero that should be off according to you and all these so called "experts"...hahaha smfh, you are almost too funny!! You do your 100y zero and I'll continue to do my 300y zero, and have ZERO issues killing whatever I wish to shoot at, end of story :)
 

clark33

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By no means a trainer, but I’m always trying to learn, evolve, get better. So I listen to the guys that do do this for a living.

Phil Velayo, Caylen Wojcik, Frank Galli, Jeff Broz, Brian Litz all have shot and seen more rounds put down at long range than most of us, all advocate 100 yd zeros when using a modern scope with external elevation adjustments. I used to zero at 200, but I did the research, listened to their reasoning behind it, it’s not their opinions, it’s based on facts, and it works. I’ve gotten better and more proficient. Don’t be scared of new ideas or ideas that challenge yours. It’s all good
 

41mag

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If my load for a particular rifle breaks the 3K fps mark I use a 200yd zero. Those rifles usually have a duplex retical or a ballistic type with mil dots. I shoot them enough that I know my holds on them out to 400yds which is as far as I can shoot in the areas I hunt. Usually it is only dropping to the bottom of the fine on a plex or the first dot on the other.

With rifles that shoot below 3k FPS, I use a 100yd zero and usually relegate them to ranges of about 250yds max in areas that are limited by terrain or wooded.

Its all kind of like briefs or boxers, whatever works for your situation. I have done both clicking and a simple set zero it all works as long as everything starts off correctly. My biggest issue with turning dials was to remember to turn them back after a long hunt. That really screws the pooch when you dial up after already dialing up two weeks prior. It happens...
 

jgs8163

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what I am trying to say is atmospheric conditions will cause a 200 yard zero to shift, unless he wants to rezero every time he goes out. I’d suggest OP talk to any reputable long range shooting instructor and ask them what his zero range will be.
Dialing off of a 200 yard zero in a new hunting location is not generally advised, hence PRS guys and even long range hunters and form USMC scout snipers (Modern Day Sniper) zero at 100

The OP never states he wants to “Zero at 200” or “dial off a 200 yard zero”. He states he wants to Zero at 100 and then adjust/set his turret at 200 when going into the field. If that’s the case he’s still Zero at 100 and will make all of his turret adjustments off of his 100 yard Zero he set at originally in his ballistic calculator or app.

All in all a 100 yard Zero is easier to achieve and removes/limits many variables that a 200 or longer zero will apply.
 

Philward

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Oct 17, 2015
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Does anyone zero at 100 yards but set their turret for 200 yard shot or MPBR and just hold on vitals out to a max range for simplicity? I can see how a 100 yard zero is convenient and with an elevation turret leaving it set on 1.75 MOA for example when hunting so it’s an easy viral hold out to 250 yards or so. Anything further can be dialed.

Exactly!!
 

clark33

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The OP never states he wants to “Zero at 200” or “dial off a 200 yard zero”. He states he wants to Zero at 100 and then adjust/set his turret at 200 when going into the field. If that’s the case he’s still Zero at 100 and will make all of his turret adjustments off of his 100 yard Zero he set at originally in his ballistic calculator or app.

All in all a 100 yard Zero is easier to achieve and removes/limits many variables that a 200 or longer zero will apply.

I am aware of this and I am suggesting this, you quoted me trying to explain this to a couple fuds, they are telling him to zero at 200 or 300.
 

Lobber

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I am aware of this and I am suggesting this, you quoted me trying to explain this to a couple fuds, they are telling him to zero at 200 or 300.

Real nice buddy. Good to see you have so much respect for others on here. Anyways, nobody ever told you or anyone to do anything, just a few other perspectives to the discussion. Wasn't trying to hijack anything.

The thing you keep saying that I don't quite grasp is how a 100 yd zero isn't influenced by atmospheric conditions and 200 magically is... Yes at 200, any potential shift would show up more than at 100, because it experiences those conditions over twice the distance, but it's not magically shifting because the zero range is at 200- yards. Imho a 200-yd zero makes any issues more detectable than at 100, BUT it's not fundamentally less accurate, unless that zero is set on a day with conditions drastically different than those expected in the field. Like it or not, a rifle with a 100-yd zero would experience the same 'shift' at 200, would it not? Therefore, how is truly more 'accurate' down range to zero at 100 instead 200? Just because a 'shift' might not show as significantly at 100, doesn't mean it's not there, and could result in compounding error just the same. I may just be a dumb fud, but physics is physics...

Again, I'm not calling anybody wrong or calling anyone names over something so silly, and I do understand that a 100 yard zero can be easier to achieve and may prove more convenient to many shooters, but there's no need to condemn folks that employ slightly different concepts than you. At the end of the day, we're all just trying to send rounds down range as accurately as we can.
 
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yobuck

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What difference does it make?
Zero is simply a known location on the dial you can come back to after dialing for other distances.
Zero stops were created simply to remind the shooter where zero is.
Setting your zero at some point you might consider an average shot distance flies in the face of why we dial.
Using a reticle for hold overs would be a better solution, and one used extensively by many prior to the 80s when dials started showing up on hunting scopes.
 

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