Your Ultimate 500 Yard Rig

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Good, Dec 5, 2018.


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  1. RH300UM

    RH300UM Well-Known Member

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    What sling or carry system is this??
     
  2. Pieter Willem Vorster

    Pieter Willem Vorster Well-Known Member

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    .
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2018
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  3. Pieter Willem Vorster

    Pieter Willem Vorster Well-Known Member

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    IMG_20170720_160309.jpg
    Springbok at 558 meters. 7 mm Tombi with Hornady 162 gr SST. Speed: 2745 f/s. Elevation from zero at 100 m, 13 MOA
     
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  4. bbraden

    bbraden Well-Known Member

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    Well done sir!
     
  5. Travis Buntin

    Travis Buntin Member

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    257 weatherby accumark ultralight topped with a 4-12x40 Zeiss. Ripping an 110 grain accubond @ 3690 fps.
     
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  6. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    RH300UM Safari sling,used for years hands free for glassing and climbing
     
  7. Rich Coyle

    Rich Coyle Well-Known Member

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    Thank you.
     
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  8. crkennedy1

    crkennedy1 New Member

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    Not sure I’m comfortable shooting 500 yards. Having said that, my Browning A-bolt stainless stalker in .30-06, topped with a Tasco 3x9 has drilled many a muley, elk and bison at 300 yards. No need to replace the scope with my higher-end Swarovski or Zeiss...
     
  9. Rich Coyle

    Rich Coyle Well-Known Member

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    I'm convinced Tasco is the best scope value. The first time I went to Alaska both the .300 and the .375 had Tasco 4-16X. I finally switched to get better low light performance.

    That performance cost hundreds more for a little improvement.
     
  10. 300whisper

    300whisper Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    Aren’t SWFAs a subsidiary of Tasco?
     
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  11. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    No, Tasco doesn't actually own a manufacturing plant. Tasco is just a brand name that subcontracts to optics manufacturers. Tasco was the original company that owned the Super Sniper name, and had those scopes built for testing for a US military contract. Tasco went out of business, and SWFA in Texas bought the patent for the SS scopes. They kept using the same company that manufactured the scopes in Japan originally, but they upgraded lots of things, like glass, lens coatings, reticle options, and magnification options, including adding variable magnification scopes (3-15x and 5-20x).

    So, technically, Tasco has never actually produced a single optic themselves, they just slap their name on them. And, like I said, I'm almost positive they went out of business in the optics world about 10+ years ago, but I could be wrong.
     
  12. Rich Coyle

    Rich Coyle Well-Known Member

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    Tasco is owned by Bushnell.
     
  13. Gcan

    Gcan Well-Known Member

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    I know the question was 500 yards, but a shot is seldom that cut and dry. What if it was 658 yards, 10 mph full value wind @ 40 degrees up hill? Perhaps the better question for me might be - What rifle would I likely have in my hands when a 10 yard, out to the longest distance shot I would accept arose for that once in a lifetime opportunity?


    If I had to run - or at my age, take a helicopter up a mountain to make a 500 yard cold bore shot, many rifles come to mind. But to answer the 10–500-800 yard + question it’s only one rifle. It would be with a Christensen, and you will never know how much it pains me to say it. I may need counseling now. My experience with Christensen Rifles comes from about 18-years ago when they were suffering growing pains; and they ensured I suffered with them. ($$$) Having said that, I am a 300 UM fan. I have a one-off 32” 1.6” Proof Research carbon barrel on a 338AM. Its not something one might consider a “mountain rifle”. We quickly determined the PR carbon barrel on the 338 weighed just ounces less than the fluted steel barrel counterpart that Kirby regularly uses. Why? While the axially wrapped Proof carbon barrels are neither appreciably lighter, nor stiffer than steel, the longitudinal matrix wrapped Christiansen barrels are a different animal. I say that being a Proof barrel (not carbon) fan.


    My current Chissy in 300 UM weights in shy of 7 lbs, sans glass. It is considerably lighter than my Tooley built 338 UM fluted Sendero of the same dimensions.


    People carry Short Action mountain rifles in 6mm, 6.5mm or 7mm calibers to make the weight. A Christensen in 300UM or 338UM with a magnum action is a featherweight rifle. Yes, any of my 6.5 x whatever will hit and kill what Im aiming at at 500yards. 500 yards is a chip shot. My 300UM will just do it better and dependably PLANT the animal. Shooting a 185 grain Berger VLD Hunter at 3300 fps with a 250 yard zero I’m -4.5 moa @500 w/2400 ftlb. No 6.5 or 7mm anything is close.

    You certainly do not want to shoot a true carbon cannon without the Titanium break. But with it, the Christiansen is a pussycat off the shoulder, sticks, bench or prone. Christiansen guns are extraordinarily lite because their barrels are actually mostly carbon fiber, not a marketing veneer. They certainly prove you do not need mad smithing acumen to build shooters.


    The first gun in 300UM Christiansen built for me was .011” over the max SAAMI headspace spec. The chamber was .003” out of spec and non concentric too. The gun was completely unsafe, and it still shot everything I fed it into 1/2 moa groups, even when it was separating cases and ruining hunts. The rifle I have now has just 22 break-in rounds thru it. I refuse to use it for anything out of principle. While breaking it in however, it shot my Surgeon loads of 210 SMKs over 90 grains of H1000 into sub 1/2 moa groups @ 100-500 yards. It shot my near 20-year old 185 Nolser BT (melters) and 180 grain Partitions loaded in unsorted Rem brass over 93 and 94 grains of R25 respectively into ragged one hole groups. It shot Remington factory loads into only slightly larger groups. These loads ranged from .012” to .050+/- off the lands and ranged in velocity from 2900-3300 fps.

    Christensen’s old claims of barrels 5x stiffer than steel are true in my mind. These things seem totally immune to harmonics- just like a 5” steel barrel might be weighing several hundred pounds might be. So if I was going to take a shot at anything on my bucket list at any distance out to 1200 yards, in any conditions, at any elevation with a gun that I might also shoot at 10 yards, it kills me to say it would be a Christiansen Carbon anything. Now if you asked about 1700 yards it would be Kirby’s 338AM.


    For my money, you can have all the exotic calibers, great builders, custom chambers and loads, hand made bullets, etc, etc, you want (God knows I may own one of each). I think the smithing fight is to beat harmonics. The better the smith, the lighter the rifles and more precise the work, but when you can take a production rifle and feed it virtually any OEM hunting load and be certain it will shoot sub 4” at 500 yards or 1” @ 500 with custom loads in hunting conditions, and print the first cold bore round, and the next 10 in the same holes, taking anything else up the hill might just be ego. Just my opinion. “Good God, that hurt.”
     
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  14. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    Not being rude, but I think it can be that cut and dry. Limits are set for whatever reason (personal convictions, conditions at the time of the shot opportunity, ballistic inadequacy of the cartridge/bullet, etc). I set limits for every rifle based on how it’s specific load/bullet combo can perform reliably, both in accuracy and terminal performance. Then if the conditions at the time aren’t ideal I’ll pass it, or sometimes my own personal deficiencies come into play.
    I’ve passed on 50 yard shots due to animals position. This year opening day elk season I had an animal @ 1600 yards with ideal environmentals and a rifle fully capable (375 grain bullet 1850 FPS & 2840 ft-lbs), however I was the limiting factor and set my limit a few hundred less than that.
    Sounds like you have some great toys, by the way!
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2018
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