Wish me luck bedding new scope

Hard rock

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Dec 20, 2020
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Tomball Texas 77377
Thanks on the scope compliment. I am
Loving it!!!!!!!!! I knew that at times my eyes would get stressed and I would have to start to refocus with regular cross hairs. The red dot is awesome. Something about all the cross hairs can fuzz plumb out while I am squeezing but this dot stays right where I want it. My old eyes are super happy with it. Zero complaints!!!!
Great I had a lens replacement done last yr I was on my way too be a left hand shooter but I'm back too my game
 

bluedog69

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May 25, 2021
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USA
Great I had a lens replacement done last yr I was on my way too be a left hand shooter but I'm back too my game
I have pigment dispersion glaucoma. Still see 20/20 but it’s hard to explain. I still don’t see all that is there compared to what I used to. Would never know it with out fancy eye tests. So that is why i Justified a scope like that. Worth every penny!!!
 

LoneTraveler

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Feb 7, 2014
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I drilled and fitted a .025 metal shim between the base and back receiver ring, Then added JB metal epoxy to fill any void. My thought was, If the rear receiver ring is .030 low, Is it parallel with the front action ring? By using epoxy , The scope base is mounted on a perfect plain with no bending or torqueing.
 

MNbogboy

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Jul 14, 2009
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Northern MN
Looks like a savage by the safety and a smooth barrel nut. A common problem is the height of the front and rear reciever is different. By tightening the front screws first, a feeler gauge will slip between the rear reciever and base revealing a gap. The bedding or a thin shim can cure this and leave a tight rail/base and prevent scope from flopping and inconsistent grouping.
 

jebel

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Jun 15, 2018
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382
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Oregon
I’ve been bedding my scope rings (top and bottom) since reading this 2019 article on LRH.

Tip: I use my old lapping bars when I bed scope rings. No use getting your scope all lubed up or worrying about it getting stuck.

 

Old rooster

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Jan 9, 2019
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684
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Montana
I see both sides of this topic.I mounted 2 new scopes in the past 6 months.One 6 months ago and one a few days ago.
I used to work for a gunsmith part time and weekends and most all I did was stock bedding,installing scopes and a few other things.
So I'm no rookie.My 308 with Talley rings and brand new Bushnell Nitro scope.Talley rep said to never lap Talley rings so I did not lap them and install went ok but I removed the scope to change to a rail and found that my brand new Bushnell Nitro scope had a bad scar where the scope tops and bottom meet on the side.If Talley's are so good why do I have a permanent scar on the side of my scope?I now lap all scope rings no matter who made them because the action must not be square.
Next scope (different rifle)was a Vortex scope and a Talley base that I had to bed as the rear did not touch the receiver and I used Leupold PRW 30mm rings but when I put the scope in the rings it was binding where the top rings meet with the bottom rings just like the other scope so again I lapped the rings.I wondered if the rings were the problem so I took the rings off and put them on the scope without being on the rifle and fit was perfect so the problem was in the receiver and not the rings.After lapping rings it sat in there like a cradle but material is gone now so should I bed the rings?
I have experienced both sides of this topic and am still trying to assimilate the info and process it.
 

jgs8163

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Sep 27, 2011
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1,845
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Southern Arizona
I see both sides of this topic.I mounted 2 new scopes in the past 6 months.One 6 months ago and one a few days ago.
I used to work for a gunsmith part time and weekends and most all I did was stock bedding,installing scopes and a few other things.
So I'm no rookie.My 308 with Talley rings and brand new Bushnell Nitro scope.Talley rep said to never lap Talley rings so I did not lap them and install went ok but I removed the scope to change to a rail and found that my brand new Bushnell Nitro scope had a bad scar where the scope tops and bottom meet on the side.If Talley's are so good why do I have a permanent scar on the side of my scope?I now lap all scope rings no matter who made them because the action must not be square.
Next scope (different rifle)was a Vortex scope and a Talley base that I had to bed as the rear did not touch the receiver and I used Leupold PRW 30mm rings but when I put the scope in the rings it was binding where the top rings meet with the bottom rings just like the other scope so again I lapped the rings.I wondered if the rings were the problem so I took the rings off and put them on the scope without being on the rifle and fit was perfect so the problem was in the receiver and not the rings.After lapping rings it sat in there like a cradle but material is gone now so should I bed the rings?
I have experienced both sides of this topic and am still trying to assimilate the info and process it.
I would but there’s differing opinions on this for sure.
 

Bullmark

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Feb 1, 2020
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500
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Roanoke Va
I would but there’s differing opinions on this for sure.
I think the gist of the whole bedding process is about the areas that you cannot see with the naked eye. The edges my be making perfect contact, but there could still be some surface area that is not making that same contact.
Operating under this mindset would require a bedding job for the scope/rings every time, regardless of any visible need.
I get it and it makes sense. Since I got semi serious about my equipment and my shooting, I’ve always used Nightforce rings and those rigs consistently shoot .5moa or less, usually less, out to distances that are Max for me.
But you never know, maybe my .280ai that is a .4moa shooter on average (with anything iwould yield better groups if I had bedded the scope to the rings????
I may go this route with my next scope mounting job, but I’m leaving well enough alone with my existing rifles.
I take a lot of time and am very meticulous when mounting a scope.....to the point where I am reluctant to take it off once it’s on and rifle is driving tacks. I have two set ups right now that I’d like to swap scopes, but I just can’t bring myself to do it. But that’s just me being neurotic.
Great topic and some excellent info being shared.
 

Old rooster

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Jan 9, 2019
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684
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Montana
What I forgot to say in my long winded post is that I have been using a Fat Wrench ever since they came out.
I contacted Talley to make sure of torque specs and Leupold for their torque specs and torqued correctly so this should have never happened.
The Bushnell is gun metal gray so I can't touch it up something and Bushnell never returned my call so to say the least I am looking at a better way to not ruin my scopes.
 

david g ranes

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Sep 9, 2009
Messages
580
What I forgot to say in my long winded post is that I have been using a Fat Wrench ever since they came out.
I contacted Talley to make sure of torque specs and Leupold for their torque specs and torqued correctly so this should have never happened.
The Bushnell is gun metal gray so I can't touch it up something and Bushnell never returned my call so to say the least I am looking at a better way to not ruin my scopes.
You have just read about every older scope I’ve taken off has always had more prevalent marks on inner and outer edges so that leads me to there is heavier contact points there and that would definitely have to make adjustment problems when a scope rings have been over like I used to do like many guys on here done years ago my torque wrench was called gootin tight I definitely wish I hadn’t bought the lapping bars just deeper in the whole we dive. David
 
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