Wind meter

BallisticsGuy

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 8, 2016
Messages
1,252
Location
Heck
You should be able to use the old Mk1 moistened finger tip or terrain indicators like vegetation or a little yarn string tied to your rifle or even mirage to get a decent wind call for targets that close so I'm of the opinion that it's not a super necessary expense for most use cases. I do know people that head shoot dozens of springbok at that kind of distance for culling and they need wind calls that are much more accurate than the above methods provide when doing that. For larger targets like deer/elk body shots you're pretty much going to still be on hair at 15mph. Learning to read those more primitive and battery free indicators is an important skill and hunters should take the time to do so. Reliance on gadgets only costs time and they always seem to go toes up at the worst possible times.

If you want one that's your call. Hell, I own one despite not using it in years especially at matches and when hunting. When I'm doing serious shooting like that I turn off the gadgets which forced me to build and use my own noggin based tools.

Caldwell's Pro model is really quite good for Caldwell. Kestrel are pretty much the gold standard. Don't buy more meter than you need. You can spend hundreds of dollars extra on models that do humidity (which has no real correctable effect inside about a mile) and have built in ballistics solvers (which are a pain to use anyway). Something like a Kestrel 2500NV would probably be your best option in that brand.

I really encourage you to build the skill. The only way to do that is to practice without turning such a gadget on. It doesn't take a lot to get pretty handy at wind calls.
 

michaelfelix13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2015
Messages
61
You should be able to use the old Mk1 moistened finger tip or terrain indicators like vegetation or a little yarn string tied to your rifle or even mirage to get a decent wind call for targets that close so I'm of the opinion that it's not a super necessary expense for most use cases. I do know people that head shoot dozens of springbok at that kind of distance for culling and they need wind calls that are much more accurate than the above methods provide when doing that. For larger targets like deer/elk body shots you're pretty much going to still be on hair at 15mph. Learning to read those more primitive and battery free indicators is an important skill and hunters should take the time to do so. Reliance on gadgets only costs time and they always seem to go toes up at the worst possible times.

If you want one that's your call. Hell, I own one despite not using it in years especially at matches and when hunting. When I'm doing serious shooting like that I turn off the gadgets which forced me to build and use my own noggin based tools.

Caldwell's Pro model is really quite good for Caldwell. Kestrel are pretty much the gold standard. Don't buy more meter than you need. You can spend hundreds of dollars extra on models that do humidity (which has no real correctable effect inside about a mile) and have built in ballistics solvers (which are a pain to use anyway). Something like a Kestrel 2500NV would probably be your best option in that brand.

I really encourage you to build the skill. The only way to do that is to practice without turning such a gadget on. It doesn't take a lot to get pretty handy at wind calls.
Thanks I agree with build my skills I usually look at the grass and trees in my location and the location of target. Thank you for your support
 

nksmfamjp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2004
Messages
1,350
Yes and no. IMO, a $30 wind meter is a good tool to practice reading wind.

Yes because at 400 yards, in a 30 mph wind, you need to adjust your aim and you need a wind meter or practice reading wind to be close enough.

No because many folks just avoid shots when there is any wind kicking up.

Let’s say you have a 308….at 400 yds, you are looking at 13” of wind drift per 10 mph. I think you got to adjust aim anything over 4” off poa.
 

michaelfelix13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2015
Messages
61
Yes and no. IMO, a $30 wind meter is a good tool to practice reading wind.

Yes because at 400 yards, in a 30 mph wind, you need to adjust your aim and you need a wind meter or practice reading wind to be close enough.

No because many folks just avoid shots when there is any wind kicking up.

Let’s say you have a 308….at 400 yds, you are looking at 13” of wind drift per 10 mph. I think you got to adjust aim anything over 4” off poa.
What brand meter for 30 dollars. I will use it to practice. And I agree would not take a shot at long distance in anything over 10mph
 

nksmfamjp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2004
Messages
1,350


Yea, my point is you can shoot pretty well with a basic ballistic calculator and a basic wind understanding.

Early wind calls ought to be 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, too much! Also, full value, half value or ignore for direction.

Once a person masters that, then talk to Kestrel!
 
Last edited:

jrock

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2014
Messages
1,267
Location
Idaho
I find a wind meter very helpful to quantify the feel of the wind. My "windy" feeling is 3 mph lows, 5 mph typical, and 7 mph gusts. I even mounted a wind meter in the back yard to quantify the effect of the wind on vegetation.

Most cartridge's start to show significant wind drifts from a 10 mph wind at 400 yards. Based on my ballistics, if it feels windy, I probably should pay attention to the wind starting at 400 yards.
 

michaelfelix13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2015
Messages
61
I find a wind meter very helpful to quantify the feel of the wind. My "windy" feeling is 3 mph lows, 5 mph typical, and 7 mph gusts. I even mounted a wind meter in the back yard to quantify the effect of the wind on vegetation.

Most cartridge's start to show significant wind drifts from a 10 mph wind at 400 yards. Based on my ballistics, if it feels windy, I probably should pay attention to the wind starting at 400 yards.
Thank you
 

Pro2A

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 23, 2009
Messages
430
Does anyone have comments on need for wind meter if I am limiting my shot to 400 yds
Even with a high dollar whirlytwirlygiggywindythingy, it only measures wind at ITS location at the actual measurement point in time. By the time you read the meter and react the wind can/will be different. Wind can change and vary over the complete bullet flight path.....time, distance, direction, height. Learn to read the wind. Shoot always in the wind to become friends with what the wind tells you. Reading wind separates the trigger pullers from the shooters.
 

michaelfelix13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2015
Messages
61
Even with a high dollar whirlytwirlygiggywindythingy, it only measures wind at ITS location at the actual measurement point in time. By the time you read the meter and react the wind can/will be different. Wind can change and vary over the complete bullet flight path.....time, distance, direction, height. Learn to read the wind. Shoot always in the wind to become friends with what the wind tells you. Reading wind separates the trigger pullers from the shooters.
Thank you. I agree and could never understand the value of the wind meter especially in varying elevation of terrain. I will buy and inexpensive one to just improve my judgement
 

K9TXS

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2014
Messages
120
Location
Clarksville, TN
As a couple of folks here mentioned, reading grass and trees close up and distances is the way to go. I used a wind meter to help me know how to read the grass and trees. Using a wind meter in the backyard help me gain experience.

When watching the wind blow the grass and trees, take a reading with your wind meter. After doing this for awhile, you really get the hang of it. So whether your reading the wind close up or at a distance you'll be very close on your wind call without a meter.
 

michaelfelix13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2015
Messages
61
As a couple of folks here mentioned, reading grass and trees close up and distances is the way to go. I used a wind meter to help me know how to read the grass and trees. Using a wind meter in the backyard help me gain experience.

When watching the wind blow the grass and trees, take a reading with your wind meter. After doing this for awhile, you really get the hang of it. So whether your reading the wind close up or at a distance you'll be very close on your wind call without a meter.
Great advice. Will do that was my plan.
Thank you.
 
Top