Why is there not much talk about Weatherby Rifles?

Hoss50

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Apr 7, 2019
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Arizona
My dad had a Vanguard in 300 weatherby he bought from walmart. It shot well enough. But kicked like a mule. We had a brake put in it and that rifle shot even better. Thise first gen Vanguards need triggers, but the timney is a good option.

I have a series 1 Vanguard in 257 weatherby that I loved, and shot my first cow elk with. It was my main rifle for years and I loved shooting it. I ended up burning the barrel out though. So even though it would have been more cost effective to buy a nice new high end Vanguard in 257, i decided to rebuild it. I just got it back a couple weeks ago, and I am happy I rebuilt it. It turned out really well.
 

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Scott2200

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Aug 29, 2018
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Chandler, Arizona
My dad had a Vanguard in 300 weatherby he bought from walmart. It shot well enough. But kicked like a mule. We had a brake put in it and that rifle **** even better. Thise first gen Vanguards need triggers, but the timney is a good option.

I have a series 1 Vanguard in 257 weatherby that I loved, and **** my first cow elk with. It was my main rifle for years and I loved shooting it. I ended up burning the barrel out though. So even though it would have been more cost effective to buy a nice new high end Vanguard in 257, i decided to rebuild it. I just got it back a couple weeks ago, and I am happy I rebuilt it. It turned out really well.
 

Eric Alexander

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Mar 30, 2015
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114
I have found them to be a mixed bag. My favorite of the bunch is the 240 Wby, followed by the .340 Wby. I am also a fan of the new 6.5x300. It seems slightly more consistently accurate than the .257 Wby BUT you need AT LEAST a 28" fairly heavy barrel to get it where it shines. My least favorite is the .338-.378, which I couldn't get to group inside 2 1/4". Sent it to Wby and they sent it back some months later with a test target showing a 5/8" group. I took it back out with the same ammo (tried 3 different bullts/weights in Wby brand) and got the same 2 1/4 - 3 1/2" as before. Interestingly, I left it with a Wby certified gunsmith first, and he couldn't get it to group as well as I did, so he sent it back to the factory. Not sure if they shot it out of a special vise or shot a 40yd target like Cooper, but they didn't shoot a 100yd target with factory ammo off a bench from bags. I had some issues with improper torque (or so they said) from some of the Mark Vs (circa late 90s/early 2000s).

Vanguards are all ok. About MOA. Occasionally you find one that is stellar, but maybe only around 1 in 10. My issue with both Mark Vs and Vanguards regarding the .240 is that most all of them have a 24" barrel (too short for the slow powder necessary to propel bullets out of that round, as it's close to overbore for the bore size, and they all have a 1:10 twist. With the long case neck perfect for 105 - 115gr bullets, it will not stabilize them. It did excellent with 100 grain flat base Sierra ProHunters, but that's about as long of a bullet as it will handle.

I am going to have a custom built with 26" #4 barrel and 1:7.5 twist (at least 1:8). I just had a 6mm Remington finished at 26" #4 with 1:8, but the lead is too short for 95gr Barnes LRX on up to be seated far enough out to keep them from taking up half the powder capacity of the case body.

You heard it here first, but if someone were to neck the 6mm Remington case up to 6.5 and make the throat to where 140gr bullets would seat at the neck/shoulder junction, with the 65,000 psi maximum average chamber pressure and 57gr case capacity, it would be known as the Creedmoor killer at matches...
This cartridge already exists and has since the 19th century. It is the 6.5x57 Mauser. An absolutely lovely round w better than Creedmore performance and feeds great. plenty of brass and ammo available. Some folks AI it and gain even more performance, close to 6.5-06.
 

[email protected]

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Alberta
Billy Dixon used a 50-90 Sharps at Adobe Wells. He said "It was a scratch shot" which meant it was a lucky shot. But yes the 45 cal. was and is one good long range bullet when used correctly. The old muzzle loader Whitworth etc. and the black powder cartridge's that were used in long range shooting matches as well as hunting usually fired at least 500 grs of lead and the velocity was just under the speed of sound, 1100ish fps. Most people don't know that black powder burns at a really constant rate making very low SE and ES. Combined with not having to go through a transonic wave makes for accuracy. Trouble is one must know EXACTLY the yardage and be a good wind doper because it becomes a pretty high angle bullet approach to the intended target. I have shot 1000 yards on steel with a Sharps 45-70 with a 520 gr bullet pushed by BP, open Vernier sight. From prone off of crossed sticks I could fire then lean over and look through my spotting scope and then see the bullet fall at a pretty good angle and hit the steel then about 3 seconds or so you hear clang. If you are watching through a spotting scope when someone fires at a 200 yards target you can see the back of the bullet just before it hits the target.
Nice post thanks
 

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jvandalf

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Jul 26, 2021
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New York
I'm wondering how well the mark v carbonite elite will do with consecutive shots? I have no reference as to how many shots it can realistically put out before overheating and becoming inacurate. It's a carbon fibre wrapped barrel. Any insight would be great on this!

Thanks
 

Quintus

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Apr 15, 2013
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1,056
I'm wondering how well the mark v carbonite elite will do with consecutive shots? I have no reference as to how many shots it can realistically put out before overheating and becoming inacurate. It's a carbon fibre wrapped barrel. Any insight would be great on this!

Thanks
It would depend on what it is chambered in for sure. You will get a longer string with a 6.5 Creedmoor than you will with a 257Bee.
 

436

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Mar 22, 2009
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NorthWest
i personally have never fired one but i know there isnt ever much talk on here about them. Is it due to not a ton of aftermarket support (im assuming that never really looked) and we all like messing with rifles lol. Are they just not a well built rifle for the price? Not accurate? Just wondering.
The first Weatherby a bought was at Warshals Sporting Goods in Seattle in the early 70s it was an Mk V 26" Delux in 257 Wby Mag, the second a year or so later was the Lazermark again in 257 Wby, later in the 90s I bought an Accumark, yep... also in .257 Wby Mag, that same year I sold my first two, (mistake) and bought a custom MkV in .338 Win Mag, also in the 90s I bought a matching set handpicked original MkV Varmintmasters with the superb miniature actions, one in 22-250 Rem the other in .224 Wby Mag which today are the only ones I have left, the 22-250 Rem have been re-barrel to a 6XC... Tubb's talked me into that while we were shooting a match in Raton NM it turned at to be a fantastic combo for a carry Deer and Yote rifle. All of the Weatherby rifles over the years have been very accurate I can remember one that did shoot a three-shot group under a 1 MOA or better in 257 Wby Mag'..., and the Accumark and Varmintmasters as a 22-250 Rem, (before re-barrel) and 224 Wby Mag hover around 1/2" and 3/4" actually the .224 Wby Mag shooting in the 1/2" inch every time I benched it if... I do my part. So are they accurate, yes I found them to be very accurate, do they cost more, yep... but, beautiful wood and blue steel are going to, add performance and just a **** fine-looking life old school hunting rifle, how could you not like them? They are exceptionally built rifles.

The top is the 6XC and the bottom is the .224 Wby Mag the other pic is the .22-250 Rem re-barreled with Krieger in 6XC the new barrel was exactly contoured to the factory barrel so the wood wouldn't have to be touched and the old barrel could be re-installed.


6mmXC Wby Varmintmaster top .224 Wby Mag Vamintmaster bottom 001 - Copy (2).jpg
6XC Varmintmaster with .22-250 Mk take barrel 028.jpg
 

gator378

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Apr 23, 2005
Messages
313
Love my 300 Weatherby Accumark. Glass bedded and ready to go. My second 300 wore out the first one. sure was fun. Thinking about the 416 Weatherby now. Not sane but want a big boomer before I go to the range in the sky
 

asd9055

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Nov 15, 2013
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655
Location
Texas
I have a 1958 west German, 80’s? Japanese MKV and 2 US MKV accumark in 300wby. I have a MKV accumark 338 LM. All shoot less than have inch! One shoots .439 at 200 yards.
 

.300 Dakota

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Jul 21, 2018
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Moss Point, MS
@436 Great looking rifles. I mean really great.
May have already commented on this somewhere in the previous pages, but I've had 2 REALLY BAD ones... Accumark in .338-.378 Wby, and Super Predator Master made around the same time as the gentleman with the beauties above in the 90s in 7mm-08. Neither would hold 2 MOA no matter what I did. Took the big boy to a Weatherby certified gunsmith who called me back to verify I was getting 2 3/8 MOA because he said he couldn't get that himself. He recrowned it and that didn't work, so we sent it to Weatherby and they kept it 4 months and sent it back no signature so it was lying on the front porch of the Mobile home I was renting late one evening with a nice factory target of 5/8". No explanation of what load was used, what, if any issue was found (soon found out that answer), or what yardage the target was shot at. I figured out that the target was evidently at about 25 yards because the gun did the EXACT same thing with multiple types of their $120/box ammo (in 2003 $). In case anyone is thinking I flinched, I took the brake off and groups IMPROVED by 1/4", but still 2 1/8"! I'll never forgive Weatherby for that! And to top it off, when I sold the thing for half the cost, I put the money on a new Remington 700 LSS .375 RUM that drilled 5/8" groups with Remington factory 300gr A-Frame Safari ammo! So with a $700 rifle and $60 box of ammo (vs $1800 and $120), I mounted a 1.5 - 6X42 Nikon Monarch Gold scope and lived happily ever after.

The previous one was a heavy barreled 7-08 that wouldn't quite make 2 MOA. That was before the 338-378 debacle. I traded that one in for about half what I paid ($1100 in mid-90s $) telling the store owner the issue. When I saw him several months later, I asked him about it and he said it was a torque issue. He said there had been a rash of returned Mark Vs around that time for accuracy issues that turned out to be improper torque between action and stock. He said it did fine after the torque adjustment, but didn't go into grand detail. Not sure if anyone had thought to look at that with the .338-.378 or not. I have heard other similar accounts of poor accuracy with that particular cartridge.

After those, I have had a REALLY GOOD one more recently in about 2014. I snagged a Lazermark in .270 Wby and the first handload I made with 130gr Barnes TTSX was a solid sub-1/2 MOA load! Very impressive!

Had 2 mediocre ones in 7mm Weatherby that would do about what Roy guaranteed - 1 1/2 MOA, and 1 .280 Rem in Mark V Classic that was very ho-hum on accuracy.

I've had a couple of .257 Wbys, but not in the Mark V. My last was a Vanguard with 24" barrel before they started putting 26" pipes on the Vanguards here a couple years back. 2 shots would go through one hole, and the 3rd was ALWAYS well over an inch out somewhere else.

Then I tried one of the first 6.5x300 Wbys in that same Vanguard. It was a sub-MOA gun! Barely, but sub-MOA nonetheless. 26" barrel in that one, but still not enough to burn all that Reloader 50 it loved so well. Velocity was not on par with those advertised from the Mark Vs. I decided I wasn't going to put up with all the bluster and blast for being short-changed on performance.

Then there was the .300 Wby I tried in the 24" Vanguard. Mistake! 3 MOA! Varied seating depths, bullets, powders, you name it; it just wouldn't hit the broad side of a barn at 500yds (quite literally).

My favorite to hunt with was a Vanguard Back Country (the high dollar model with pillar and glass bedding, Cerakote, and nice, lightweight stock). The .240 Wby was stupid accurate in that rifle, and the 2-stage trigger was customizable to get a pretty light 2nd stage break. Great looking and great handling rifle. If only it had utilized a 26" 1:8 barrel, it would still be my EDC rifle in hunting season.

That is the biggest issue I have with Weatherby. They develop these great cartridges like the .240 (no freebore like the larger iterations) and now the 6.5 RPM and neuter them with short barrels and/or slow twists. They are boringly predictable and have been since Roy had his ballistics guru back off saying 1 1/2" 100yd accuracy was plenty good enough. An egregious error that is likely the single reason we aren't talking about Weatherbys now like we discuss Bartlein and Defiance.

Today's Mark Vs are more innovative, but ridiculously overpriced, IMO. I do love the action, but would have to rebarrel most of them properly.

I wouldn't hesitate to buy a new Mark V in .240 Wby or 6.5 RPM, or even another 6.5x300 Wby, IF they were properly barreled and twisted.

Perhaps the finest of all the Weatherby cartridges for accuracy is the .340. That round has the reputation of being a tack driver, and mine certainly was - but it was a Sako 75 Hunter with 24" barrel (not ideal, for sure). Overall, in the Mark V, I wouldn't hesitate to buy a .270 Wby or a .340. If I could rebarrel it properly, a .240 might be my top pick of all time. My experience has been a mixed bag, for sure. I'd say if you're going to buy a Mark V, buy it in a Weatherby cartridge chambering (except the .378-based cartridges unless you're going to Africa where it won't matter if it shoots 2 1/2 MOA) and buy it in a classic wood configuration. That way, if it turns out it's not a great shooter, it still makes a great mantle piece and a great heirloom.
 
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