Why hunt sheep?

CBH Australia

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Joined
Dec 12, 2020
Messages
125
Location
Australia
Don't stone me.
I never saw sheep as a huntable species although I know it's done. I'm not a trophy hunter. I like guns, hunting, the outdoors, guns an gun gear and I mostly shoot pests, but I do like guns., Mostly rifles and mostly modern hunting rifles.
I hunted Africa on a cull hunt, I've hunted goat for meat. I am fascinated by Dangerous game.
My budget is that of an average working person, if I'm careful I can save for stuff.
I now think I would like to Hunt an Arapawa sheep in New Zealand.
In Australia we can usually muster sheep,bthe odd wild or woolly strangler might be shot if it's going to affect genetics.
I guess I'm asking what the allure is for a dedicated sheep hunter.
I recently had a lightweight rifle built in .280ai from a Tikka action. More because I like rifles and thought it a versatile cartridge when I researched it.
But hunting sheep would be different and I don't want a trophy but the experience. Where I'm from it would not be a challenge to shoot a sheep but there are colonies of exotic sheep that seem like a whole different thing.
And hopefully it's not that expensive in New Zealand if I'm after the experience as opposed to a Trophy.
 

jimss

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Joined
Mar 30, 2013
Messages
120
When I saw the post I was thinking dall, bighorn, desert, stone, california, etc sheep which are considered by many as the most coveted tags in North America! How about majestic argali sheep? Wild, non-fenced aoudad sheep hunting in West TX and NM is considered the poor-man's sheep hunt in the US and can be a grueling, rough hunt. When I think of wild sheep these are the species I think of.

There are a few "odd" species available to hunt across the world. How about a camel hunt? Giraffe? I've seen feral cow hunts. How about zebra (wild horse?). There's a wide variety of exotics available to hunt in Texas. Lots of different options and some are the price of a hunting license.
 

CBH Australia

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Joined
Dec 12, 2020
Messages
125
Location
Australia
There are camel in Australia if you can access them, scrub cattle in some areas. Even places with wild horses.
From what I know I can't think of areas known to have Wild Sheep or sheep hunting.
Other than a few going feral from the mob I think sheep are farmed and managed . Feral sheepi might be destroyed by the farmer if they know of them or can find them. Feral sheep would be ones that have avoided muster/shearing/management over a couple of years becoming smarter and harder to muster by hiding in thick bush, creek lines or scrub.
 

WeekendWarrior

Active Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2021
Messages
28
Location
United States
Don't stone me.
I never saw sheep as a huntable species although I know it's done. I'm not a trophy hunter. I like guns, hunting, the outdoors, guns an gun gear and I mostly shoot pests, but I do like guns., Mostly rifles and mostly modern hunting rifles.
I hunted Africa on a cull hunt, I've hunted goat for meat. I am fascinated by Dangerous game.
My budget is that of an average working person, if I'm careful I can save for stuff.
I now think I would like to Hunt an Arapawa sheep in New Zealand.
In Australia we can usually muster sheep,bthe odd wild or woolly strangler might be shot if it's going to affect genetics.
I guess I'm asking what the allure is for a dedicated sheep hunter.
I recently had a lightweight rifle built in .280ai from a Tikka action. More because I like rifles and thought it a versatile cartridge when I researched it.
But hunting sheep would be different and I don't want a trophy but the experience. Where I'm from it would not be a challenge to shoot a sheep but there are colonies of exotic sheep that seem like a whole different thing.
And hopefully it's not that expensive in New Zealand if I'm after the experience as opposed to a Trophy.
I have not sheep hunted myself, yet, so take my 2 cents with a grain of salt.

In the States it takes 15-20 years of applying to get a tag sometimes, and I haven't been at it long enough to draw yet. I also don't have the cash to buy a guided trip in Canada or AK either. However, which ever comes first, I'll do it.

The sheep we are hunting are not the sheep you see penned up and used for wool. The sheep we are hunting live in incredibly treacherous and dangerous terrain, which posses an exceptional physical challenge and real hazard to those hunting them in their natural habitat (see pics below). For example, the famous hunter Roy Roth died falling off a cliff hunting sheep. Combine that with the lack of opportunity, and such a rare hunt becomes a thing of legend in the minds of all hunters. Avid hunters will spend their whole lives waiting for one opportunity to hunt sheep, and they will usually get only one chance to make it count. Most of the folks I have met who finally do get a tag crack open their bank account and hire a guide to increase their chances. When you have waited 20 years to have a single chance, you don't want to blow it.

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We do have a number of high fence ranches in Texas and Oklahoma where you can "hunt" a sheep, but it isn't quite the same as going on a proper sheep hunt in their natural environment of high mountains, thin air, and steep cliffs. Even desert sheep live in some brutal terrain (see second pic above). I have no issue with the practice of doing a Texas ranch hunt, and if I get become incapable of going a sheep hunt later in life due to health, I will absolutely be eyeing a Texas ranch hunt instead. That said, it isn't the same experience though.

All the patience, persistence, preparation, hard work, and sheer difficulty of a sheep hunt makes it a highly coveted hunt and badge of honor for those who have the opportunity. It is as real of an adventure as hunting can get.

The same adventure people seek sheep hunting, is also why we seek hunting mountain goat. Similarly treacherous environments and difficultly drawing a tag.

1615267530962.png


They all taste pretty good too.

If you just want meat, there are better options for filling your freezer though.
 

backwoodsshooter

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Joined
Jan 15, 2021
Messages
78
Location
North Carolina
oddly enough, the biggest reason i won’t get a guided hunt (nothing wrong with them, but i don’t trophy hunt, i wanna fill my freezer) is if i’m forking out that amount of money, i can go to the store and buy a lot of meat to fill my freezer and a few more freezers, and still have a good chunk left.

BUT if i was to go on a guided hunt, heck yea it’s be OCONUS. africa hunts are really appealing to me.

as far as the OP, never thought of hunting sheep, and probably won’t cause they are not in NC and well, as cool as a mount as it would be on the wall, refer back to the first prt of this post lol.
 

wildwilderness

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Joined
May 1, 2011
Messages
148
As stated wild free sheep and feral domestic sheep are two very different animals, hunts, terrain, experiences.it’s the places they live, the effort to get one, the exclusivity of the trophy.... If you have to ask why, you are lucky you aren’t addicted!
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MTGunner

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Joined
Sep 24, 2004
Messages
215
Location
Ronan, MT
CBH, it’s a blasted addiction, an obsession, an adventure that never fails to satisfy. So far that is. Successful or not it continues to call to this old man. May die one day chasing the mountain Ovis or Capra species. But, good ‘nuff! MTG
 

CBH Australia

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Joined
Dec 12, 2020
Messages
125
Location
Australia
Agreed, but I don't need to climb a mountain for a chop.
I like a Lamb roast too.
Its hard for me I'm a shooter who likes shooting pests. So I don't collect trophies each to their own.
I am fascinated by Dangerous game so I would keep a bear skin rug or a lion but I'm **** out of luck finding those to hunt in Australia.
 

John McLaughlin

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Joined
Sep 29, 2018
Messages
64
Location
Toledo OH
I've been on 6 wild sheep hunts with four on the wall, Desert, Dall's, (2) Rocky Mtn. and a blank spot from two unsuccessful Stone's hunts. Love the country that they live in, and am amazed that they can earn a living in their ranges. The disease is called "Ovis Pyrexia" Sheep Fever. Once infected, never recover. JM
 

clock

Member
Joined
May 10, 2010
Messages
10
I drew a desert in Arizona in 1978 and killed a good ram, and that was the beginning of a 20 pursuit ending in my slam being completed in 1998 with a Rocky in Colorado. I wasn’t hung up on getting the slam, but I did kill moose, caribou, goat and a grizzly on those hunts as well, just hunting for me, and it was a lot cheaper in the 80s and 90s,clock
 

Indian7953

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Joined
Feb 15, 2015
Messages
137
I drew a desert in Arizona in 1978 and killed a good ram, and that was the beginning of a 20 pursuit ending in my slam being completed in 1998 with a Rocky in Colorado. I wasn’t hung up on getting the slam, but I did kill moose, caribou, goat and a grizzly on those hunts as well, just hunting for me, and it was a lot cheaper in the 80s and 90s,clock
Dahl sheep is the best meat in the woods, or in the rocks. One of the most exciting, taxing, hunts that I’ve ever been on in some of the most magnificent scenery.
 

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