When do you when to replace brass

rodneymoncrief

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I've been reloading for a 25 years now, and I am having a gunsmith remove the first ever stuck rifle case removed from a chamber. I was wondering when you guys know it is time to replace your brass.
 

digger11

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Usually when the primer pocket get loose. Visual inspection between each loading(cull accordingly).But when the primers seat to easy toss em. IMHO
 

rodneymoncrief

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What I normally go buy is when primer pockets get loose, I guess I missed one.
I will definitely be more carefull from now on. Thanks for the info
 

Doublezranch

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Be careful with loose primers. If not careful, they will cut your bolt face. I was just talking J E Custom about this. The primer will shoot back so hard that it will "cut" or gouge and sometimes even leave a perfect primer ring on the bolt face. Once that happens you could be in some real trouble. I'm with Mudrunner, if my primer pockets get easy to seat, it's time to go. Now, there are crimpers that will tighten up the primer pockets. I have never used one because brass to me is disposable. I have heard of people super gluing the primer in but to me that's a crazy home remedy.
 

FearNoWind

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... I have heard of people super gluing the primer in but to me that's a crazy home remedy.

Agreed - that kind of remedy is too absurd for words. If I knew anyone who chose that as a solution to lose primers he'd never be included in any of my shooting activities. Makes you wonder what kind of mentality is behind some guns.
I anneal brass every fourth cycle so my primer pockets tend to wear out before any other part of the case structure. I monitor neck conditions very closely, inspecting with every reloading cycle. Any evidence of weakness in the neck or shoulder results in discarding that case. I also use a feeler gauge to check the inside of the case wall at the web. If it doesn't feel quite right I check it with the bore scope.
 

justgoto

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Carrollton, Ohio
Be careful with loose primers. If not careful, they will cut your bolt face. I was just talking J E Custom about this. The primer will shoot back so hard that it will "cut" or gouge and sometimes even leave a perfect primer ring on the bolt face. Once that happens you could be in some real trouble. I'm with Mudrunner, if my primer pockets get easy to seat, it's time to go. Now, there are crimpers that will tighten up the primer pockets. I have never used one because brass to me is disposable. I have heard of people super gluing the primer in but to me that's a crazy home remedy.

That is why I don't take loose pockets into consideration; I consider that a problem with the load being too hot. If I find that a load that is causing loose pockets, I reduce the charge weight. I'll get 100+ firings from my cases, when loaded to what I deem as acceptable pressure.
 

Canadian Bushman

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I look for rings near the head indicating excessive web thinning, use a paper clip to feel for a thin spot in the web inside the case, or i even cut a percentage in half and visually inspect it.

If i get a case head seperation, i throw the whole lot away.

My primer pockets dont loosen very fast with my mild loads, and i rarely split a neck.
 

MachV

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Casper Wy
My recycling pail has brass in it for four main reasons, most can be prevented.

#1 loose primer pockets=too much pressure, the 338 Edge/remington brass and all but 223 Federal brass will account for 99% . backing off the powder does wonders -;)

#2 Case separation. So far the Ruger 7mag has been the only problem child, just neck sizing solved the problem but the real fix would be rechambering .

#3 split necks. Annieling will help brass last longer but it happens anyway.

#4 range brass that has been on the range too long, it gets brittle and all kinds of things can happen= All bad!

When someone tells me they have never blown a primer, stuck a case or made a bad shot are either liars or aint been at it long enough !
 

MudRunner2005

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My recycling pail has brass in it for four main reasons, most can be prevented.

#1 loose primer pockets=too much pressure, the 338 Edge/remington brass and all but 223 Federal brass will account for 99% . backing off the powder does wonders -;)

#2 Case separation. So far the Ruger 7mag has been the only problem child, just neck sizing solved the problem but the real fix would be rechambering .

#3 split necks. Annieling will help brass last longer but it happens anyway.

#4 range brass that has been on the range too long, it gets brittle and all kinds of things can happen= All bad!

When someone tells me they have never blown a primer, stuck a case or made a bad shot are either liars or aint been at it long enough !
Oh yeah! Like we always used to say about rodeo...If you don't get hurt, you ain't trying hard enough. :cool:

I blew a primer earlier this year....Scared the crap out of me. I took my rifle back to the smith, he pulled it all down, mangalfuxed everything, and then put it all back together. Said it was fine. **** that was scary. It was during the 2nd round of load develpment, too... I was ****ED, cause I thought I'd blown up my brand new rifle. LOL
 
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