Wheeler FAT wrench digital or analog????

Joined
Apr 9, 2020
Messages
24
Location
Corona,CA
I bought the digital thinking it was the "new and improved" version,used it once and didn't like it at all so bought the analog(clicker is way easier than trying to decipher that damned beeping on the digital version). 👍
 

nksmfamjp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2004
Messages
1,563
I have the digital and wish every time I use it that I had the analog. If you want to over or under tighten something every time, get the digital one.
I wish I had the digital where the beeps were more precise, the low end went to 10 land adjustment was faster.
 

codyadams

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2015
Messages
3,770
Location
Southwest Wyoming
I must be one of the odd ones, I have used both and prefer the digital. I don't use the beeper at all, I just ignore it. If it really bothers you that much,, I suppose you could just turn the beeps up all the way and you would almost never hear them. Pretty simple, I watch the read out and torque up to the value I want, works great, and I don't have to remember to take the pressure off or read the marker on the analog one. I feel it is more precise than the clicker one, at least within the realm of accuracy these tools have. As far as seeing the readout, never had an issue there, when working on guns they are on the bench or in a vise and I'm standing over them. It's not a car, I'm not crawling under it and getting in contorted positions to tighten a bolt.....ha ha.
 

mdvctry

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2012
Messages
90
I have the wheeler analog and the fix-it sticks in my range bag. I prefer the wheeler, the fix-sticks are adequate. I’ve never had any issues with the wheeler.
 

david.eustache

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2021
Messages
69
Location
Michigan
I like the analog vortex torque wrench better than the Wheeler. I always hated that overly huge grip on the Wheeler.
I believe the vortex is 50 inch pounds some applications are 55 but it works quite well for me. The one I read about in a recent post only goes up to 40 which sometimes is definitely not enough for some applications on firearms
 

robpiat

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 26, 2009
Messages
127
If you do some detailed reading you'll find there lots of error or variables in the process and the quality or resolution of tool is not even relevant unless you control for those. Torque creates tension or springiness but isn't always directly correlated to friction which is a factor in setting stuff. Here's a list of things that likely have more impact on the final result than the tool you are using:

Lubricated vs dry
- lubricity of anything on there
perfectly clean vs some residue
thread locker
whether the screw / nut has been stretched or torqued before
Alloys, galling etc
Quality and consistency of the threads

So if you took a nut and a bolt made by the same guy with the same process, the first time you torque it, mark it. The next time it might be at a further clock position.

If you torque something with a little contamination in there three times it'll likely be three different clock positions each time

Many precision applications call for a lubricated torque because I believe it controls alot of variables and creates more consistency. I'm sure there are people that are much better at explaining this than me, but at the end of the day I am not super concerned about the precision of my tool as I realize its always just a ballpark.
 

Norbear

New Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2018
Messages
1
Location
Bossier City, LA
I own both Wheelers and perfer the analog. I can hardly hear the digital version. I did not know I could look at the display while using it until I read this blog, so I am going to give the digital another try when mounting my new CT 3X18.
 

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