What's your ideal hunting arrow build?

TopPin

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Let's say you have a generous budget, you can use the best or any available components money can buy. Not what are you actually going to buy and use, what is your ideal component set? What are you going to build/spec out and why? What's the target weight you are looking for? What broadhead are you flying on them? What is your reasoning for the component chosen? Just curious what everyone see's as the top components out there. I am going to build a new batch of arrows after the season and over the winter, partly because I need things to do and partly because I enjoy the process. Budget will be a concern, but it will be top shelf stuff. I have been out of archery until recently for a long time and a LOT has changed. It's been fun getting back into it and learning again.
 

TopPin

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So the reality of what a weight of an arrow can be summed up simply by the Kinetic Energy Formula. Most people think that a heavy plus 500 grain arrow out penetrates a 400 grain arrow. Not the case. Speed kills but so does weight, so what’s the happy median, play with Kinetic energy formula and you will see that there is a point of diminishing returns with a heavy arrow, also not enough weight to speed ratio. Depending on the Lbs of weight you draw, draw length, and weight of the arrow, you will be surprised by what is “ideal” performance in an arrow weight. Most bows as an example will peak at energy for example 70 Lbs 29 inch Draw 300 FPS around 445 grains of arrow weight. Now depending on one’s draw length, and weight it will very. Then you can go down a rabbit hole of broadhead performance, shaft diameter ext, and helical of fletching. By the way the more twist you put on a fletching up to 3 to 4 degrees the better arrow stabilization you have, but the faster it spins the more fps you lose. The faster arrow is straight Vain, but a more stable arrow is 4 degree right helical. Also if you shoot into plywood testing right or left helical the only difference in stability of the arrow is nothing, but you will see a left helical loosens the broad head due to the thread pattern of the broadhead, lefty loosely, righty tighty of the threads. A right helical the broadhead never loosens up due to tightening upon impact the threads in the broadhead tighten into the insert. So run the formula and you will be surprised at what you find. Also 60/40 weight forward is a better arrow mason far as plus 55 yard shots. So find what works best for you. Also fixed blades out penetrate mechanical broadheads all day long period. More importantly make sure your shooting the correct spine of arrow, it’s easier to tune a heavier spine shaft past 40 yards than a spine that is to light. Good luck happy hunting
 

charliewhisky

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Sep 7, 2010
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75
Let's say you have a generous budget, you can use the best or any available components money can buy. Not what are you actually going to buy and use, what is your ideal component set? What are you going to build/spec out and why? What's the target weight you are looking for? What broadhead are you flying on them? What is your reasoning for the component chosen? Just curious what everyone see's as the top components out there. I am going to build a new batch of arrows after the season and over the winter, partly because I need things to do and partly because I enjoy the process. Budget will be a concern, but it will be top shelf stuff. I have been out of archery until recently for a long time and a LOT has changed. It's been fun getting back into it and learning again.
I have not built an arrow for twenty years so I have no real idea as to cost. I don’t lose many arrows. I generally take a deer each year from close range, less than 15 yds, from the ground, while still hunting or in early morning ambush. When I was building arrows my needs were simple. I bought broomsticks with heavy, two bladed, broadheads and target points to match. The reasoning was that I wanted to be able to shoot thru small windows in heavy vegetation, think six inches, shooting from one side of an overgrown fence line to a target five to thirty yds out. To do this, you require an arrow with very little flex from the string. The broad heads, think Bear Broadheads, were chosen because I learned they would shatter a shoulder or rib and when hunting like I do, target choice is forced on you. They are also indestructible and sharpen back up. You will note that I am not a long distance, fine accuracy, archer. I have always been a meat hunter. On my old compound, I use a single sight pin set at about 15 yds and hold over, or under, as required. I also make Indian style self bows once in awhile and shoot arrows in the appropriate weight range with the same heavy broadheads. The choice works for me. An example: I spent two hours kneeling in grass ,on a slope just outside a tree line one evening. I was just above the military crest. When I saw two ears, I drew and raised up. The target offered was a hind end, facing away, shot. The bow was a sixty lb compound and the arrow cut the artery inside the left hind leg and passed thru the bowel and chest wall. The force both lifted the rear end and pushed the chest down and the arrow was stuck almost vertically into the ground. The doe ran about forty yds and collapsed trying to jump a small stream. I will admit that if I was required to hunt at longer ranges my arrow choice would probably be different.
 

BrentM

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Jan 10, 2013
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Meridian, Idaho
Might want to throw in what animal and distance. I hunt mule deer and elk. Main thing for me is no off brands. Easton, g5, helical 3 fletch. Been a good combo for a long time and zero tuning issues. The key in my mind is getting the correct foc, spine strength, and weight balance. For elk I run 420-500 grains. My compound likes 420-450. My recurve is currently at 500 but may go up to 600. Recurve is 35 yrds or less tho so the process is much different than a compound.
 

HSmithTX

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Jan 11, 2022
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364
Location
Texas
Thanks all for the input, I should have stated in the original post that my arrows will be shooting a dozen or more hogs for every other animal shot!

EDIT to add: Distances on hogs are any given, usually under 30 or over 50 out to 60+. I am quite comfortable shooting beyond 80 at targets but hogs won't hold still ever.....

Steve, thanks for the info and the PM, very helpful. A V3X 33 is on my list to try when my current bow gets less interesting. I don't ever see my self going less than 33 ata or 6.5 brace height.....
 

JD Jones

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Nov 23, 2021
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225
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Texas
Axis 300 spine match
Q2i 3 vane 2* heli
Lighted nock
Brass 50 insert
125 cutthroats (sharpened 5 last night for next weekend)
 

Critter Picker

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Oct 30, 2019
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Wisconsin
I will say that I think the best arrow flight is with feather fletch. BUT it's not durable, doesn't work well in the rain and it's noisy. Usedvanes for years now.
 

Philward

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Oct 17, 2015
Messages
683
Location
Wa
I've tried several different arrow brands and diameters, Easton bargain ones that worked and shot fine, gold tip, dca, the one that builds them weight forward. Currently shooting Victory rip 204 elites and gold tip airstrike. I think the Victory arrows shoot the best of any I've used, maybe it's the bow I use them with but they always fly great and true.
 

FlGunner

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Jan 9, 2016
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335
Location
Florida
Prior to Easton discontinuing the Hexx arrows that’s what I used. 100 grain 1.75” Swhackers and blazer vanes. I primarily hunt whitetail and never had an arrow not pass through. Didn’t matter if it here in Florida, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, all pass through. Made my longest kill at 56 yds with that arrow.
Now I use the 5mm Axis match series with same broadhead. A lil slower but kills just as good. Seems to be more durable and definitely tougher than the 4mm axis I’ve seen from buddies shooting them.
 

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