Whats the advantage of Hammer rounds ?

Northkill

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2019
Messages
636
Location
PA
Nope- I'm just not into dogmatism
Which is worse, dogmatism or hyperbole? ;) There's some truth on all sides - dead is dead. Most bullets I've used killed well a high percentage of the time. What I've appreciated about the Hammers is the unfailing reliability. I've used many of the premium bonded & partition bullets as well as the Berger's, ELD-X's, ELD-M's, etc. They all did very well most of the time. They have their limitations for some or all of the following: rpm's, high impact velocity, shoulder hits, extreme angle hits, etc. What got me with the Hammers is the reliability and penetration to get the job done every time. At least for me, they've been 100 for 100 so far. 52 gr HH for 223 Rem up to the 169 HH in a 7-LRM. Once, someone using my rifle made a hit that would have resulted in a slow death / lengthy track with a conventional bullet, but one or more of the petals from the Hammer spread out and caught the vitals. That impressed me.

As far as your experiences, I don't question you, though there are contributing factors to consider, such as bullet weight selection and the speed you're running them at. The more spectacular kills that I've witnessed were with them going very fast. That is where they shine. Running nominal speeds, the game will react similar to conventionals. You're just more sure to get complete penetration with the Hammers. And less meat damage.

This is not a sales pitch. We're all just answering the OP's honest question. This is his thread.
 

shinbone

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2009
Messages
274
Location
Denver, Colorado
Just to add:

". . . there are contributing factors to consider, such as bullet weight selection and the speed you're running them at . . . " Twist is another important factor, too.

And, people reporting their own personal experience is not dogma. In fact, it is the opposite of dogma.

But I do agree that folks should shoot whatever it is they like.
 

ButterBean

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2012
Messages
4,826
Location
West Terre Haute Indiana
Which is worse, dogmatism or hyperbole? ;) There's some truth on all sides - dead is dead. Most bullets I've used killed well a high percentage of the time. What I've appreciated about the Hammers is the unfailing reliability. I've used many of the premium bonded & partition bullets as well as the Berger's, ELD-X's, ELD-M's, etc. They all did very well most of the time. They have their limitations for some or all of the following: rpm's, high impact velocity, shoulder hits, extreme angle hits, etc. What got me with the Hammers is the reliability and penetration to get the job done every time. At least for me, they've been 100 for 100 so far. 52 gr HH for 223 Rem up to the 169 HH in a 7-LRM. Once, someone using my rifle made a hit that would have resulted in a slow death / lengthy track with a conventional bullet, but one or more of the petals from the Hammer spread out and caught the vitals. That impressed me.

As far as your experiences, I don't question you, though there are contributing factors to consider, such as bullet weight selection and the speed you're running them at. The more spectacular kills that I've witnessed were with them going very fast. That is where they shine. Running nominal speeds, the game will react similar to conventionals. You're just more sure to get complete penetration with the Hammers. And less meat damage.

This is not a sales pitch. We're all just answering the OP's honest question. This is his thread.

Just to add:

". . . there are contributing factors to consider, such as bullet weight selection and the speed you're running them at . . . " Twist is another important factor, too.

And, people reporting their own personal experience is not dogma. In fact, it is the opposite of dogma.

But I do agree that folks should shoot whatever it is they like.
Dead is Dead, no arguing that point, He said he never tracked a wound chanel so he is just assuming as he has no facts , But you are correct, The faster they go the more authority they have, as I said earlier I don't care what you shoot and yeah there are tons of great bullets on the market but with all the testing that has been done and unless something drastic changes Hammers are the gold standard right now IMHO
 

Andrew Massi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2018
Messages
690
Location
Lincoln Ca
Which is worse, dogmatism or hyperbole? ;) There's some truth on all sides - dead is dead. Most bullets I've used killed well a high percentage of the time. What I've appreciated about the Hammers is the unfailing reliability. I've used many of the premium bonded & partition bullets as well as the Berger's, ELD-X's, ELD-M's, etc. They all did very well most of the time. They have their limitations for some or all of the following: rpm's, high impact velocity, shoulder hits, extreme angle hits, etc. What got me with the Hammers is the reliability and penetration to get the job done every time. At least for me, they've been 100 for 100 so far. 52 gr HH for 223 Rem up to the 169 HH in a 7-LRM. Once, someone using my rifle made a hit that would have resulted in a slow death / lengthy track with a conventional bullet, but one or more of the petals from the Hammer spread out and caught the vitals. That impressed me.

As far as your experiences, I don't question you, though there are contributing factors to consider, such as bullet weight selection and the speed you're running them at. The more spectacular kills that I've witnessed were with them going very fast. That is where they shine. Running nominal speeds, the game will react similar to conventionals. You're just more sure to get complete penetration with the Hammers. And less meat damage.

This is not a sales pitch. We're all just answering the OP's honest question. This is his thread.
Without beating a dead horse- I was shooting the 124 out of a 6.5-300 and the 143 out of a 7mm wby~ 3550 and ~3400 respectively
 

Hand Skills

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2017
Messages
1,164
Location
Canada
A lung shooter by choice, I am used to animals traveling a ways before they expire.

I have seen deer run over 200yds in open country after a solid double lung shot.

Never had an animal go more than 100ft after being hit with a Hammer.

That is enough for me - I will continue to hunt with Hammers, because based on my experience they kill faster than other bullets.

After the shot is when the work begins. Hammers seem to ease the recovery effort AND preserve valuable meat, so yes, they have been a game changer for me.

Thank you @RockyMtnMT for all you do!
 

ButterBean

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2012
Messages
4,826
Location
West Terre Haute Indiana
The rifle community is a tradition oriented group, and consequently slow to change. Part of this is because it is an old sport, and so attracts people who like the tradition, and, also, it is dominated by old guys who "have seen it all", and thus have closed their minds to change. Heck, there are legions of folks who say the 30-06 is still the best hunting cartridge, despite the many better cartridges in existence. (Not saying the 30-06 is a bad cartridge, just that there have been improvements in case, powder, and bullet design in the last 100 years, and the 30-06 is no longer the optimum design it once was.)

The traditional lead cup-and-core bullets were a game changer when they were introduced. They revolutionized ballistics, rifle design, and hunting methods. C-n-C bullets took over the shooting world, and rightly so. C-n-C bullets performed differently than the previous cast bullet designs, and thus needed to be loaded differently to realize their potential. It is obvious to us now, but only an ignorant person would load a C-n-C bullet like it was a cast bullet and expect C-n-C performance.

C-n-C bullets kill by gross tissue destruction. The terminal ballistics are defined by temporary and permanent wound channels caused by the rounded, domed, mushroomed front surface of the expanded lead core. Also, a C-n-C bullet will lose about 40% of its weight at impact, and that lost 40% contributes little-to-nothing in killing the animal. In other words, if you need a 100 gr bullet to kill the animal, you need to launch a 140 gr bullet, with the accompanying loss of muzzle velocity and increased recoil.

But, fortunately, humans are driven to innovate and technology never stops improving.

(here's where the tradition-bound hunting community does its face plant) Hammer Bullets, and similar monolithic designs, have a different structure and kill by a different mechanism compared to C-n-C bullets. These newer designs kill by hydrostatic shock. Upon impact, the bullet sheds its front petals, which go on to do their own damage, and the now-flat front of the bullet shank drives a hydrostatic shock wave through the tissue. (This in contrast to older monolithic designs which mimic C-n-C bullets by mushrooming). The hydrostatic shock wave is caused by the flat shape of the leading surface of the bullet combined with the speed of the bullet's impact. The shock wave disrupts/destroys tissue over a larger volume than the wound cavity of a C-n-C bullet, and thus kills the animal quicker, frequently nearly instantly. It is common to see entire organs turned to jelly by the shock wave relatively far away from the bullet's path. Additionally, the bullet shank almost always exits to reliably produce two holes for better blood loss. Since almost all the weight of the bullet contributes to killing, a lighter weight bullet will do the job, which also means you get more speed, and you reap the benefits of the "V^2" term in "E= ½MV^2". In other words, Hammer bullets is game-changing new technology, similar to when C-n-C bullets were introduced.

The result being, don't shoot a Hammer bullet like it is a C-n-C bullet. For Hammer bullets, choose a traditionally light-for-caliber bullet weight, and run it super fast. As seen from some of the data posted here and in other threads, a handloader can run Hammer bullets surprisingly fast. If you choose to run Hammer bullets, your gun will shoot like a laser and produce extremely quick kills.

In addition to excellent terminal performance, most users report that Hammer bullets are extremely easy to work up an accurate load.

One kill doesn't prove anything, but this is an example of typical Hammer bullet performance:
Very well said Sir
 

FEENIX

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2008
Messages
16,996
Location
Great Falls, MT
The rifle community is a tradition oriented group, and consequently slow to change. Part of this is because it is an old sport, and so attracts people who like the tradition, and, also, it is dominated by old guys who "have seen it all", and thus have closed their minds to change.
There will always be resistance to change; it is human nature, and humans are creatures of habit. It is up to the OP/end-user to synthesize the presented information and adapt them to their intended purpose. As a change agent and continuous process improvement practitioner, I have seen this in organizations for the last 35 years. We all know the adage, "if it is not broke, don't fix it." In contrast, the Japanese have their "kaizen" - simply put, continuous process improvement.
 

HARPERC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2011
Messages
6,793
Location
Spokane, WA
We all know the adage, "if it is not broke, don't fix it." In contrast, the Japanese have their "kaizen" - simply put, continuous process improvement.
One of the things about Hammer that's been fun is their openness to modifying their bullets.
Not being satisfied with terminal performance a couple of times, the HP gets bigger.
Finding more customers honestly needing short, and medium range bullets, and we get more redesign.
Really as a result of wild late night discussions, almost double dog dare you in nature, machinery altered, shapes changed, and bullets sent to be field tested on animals thick and thin, and in volume.
Some surprises both good and bad, but all made public. Transparency.
Some good bullets out there, but if you can't get them so what. If you can't legally use them who'd you vote for? Some bright people in some companies, but if you can't access them to learn from it doesn't help. If you have a unique need, but nobody cares you're on your own.
You've got a company guarantees bullets, rather than have an unhappy customer. Front door to the shop is open, for those wanting visual reassurance.
To reduce that to hyperbole, cult like, or usurping tried and true market share is lost on me.
 

ButterBean

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2012
Messages
4,826
Location
West Terre Haute Indiana
One of the things about Hammer that's been fun is their openness to modifying their bullets.
Not being satisfied with terminal performance a couple of times, the HP gets bigger.
Finding more customers honestly needing short, and medium range bullets, and we get more redesign.
Really as a result of wild late night discussions, almost double dog dare you in nature, machinery altered, shapes changed, and bullets sent to be field tested on animals thick and thin, and in volume.
Some surprises both good and bad, but all made public. Transparency.
Some good bullets out there, but if you can't get them so what. If you can't legally use them who'd you vote for? Some bright people in some companies, but if you can't access them to learn from it doesn't help. If you have a unique need, but nobody cares you're on your own.
You've got a company guarantees bullets, rather than have an unhappy customer. Front door to the shop is open, for those wanting visual reassurance.
To reduce that to hyperbole, cult like, or usurping tried and true market share is lost on me.
I like the double dog dare myself
 

T3ninja

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2016
Messages
765
Location
NW indiana
This is 11 shots with hammer Bullets from a .375cheytec at 100 yards... during a ladder test.. charge weights were 120gr up to 125 gr. Velocity was 2792 up to 2864. With a 395 gr bullet.
FAA6CC86-3E89-4483-8C1D-1A5112688E32.jpeg
 

Hard rock

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2020
Messages
496
Location
Tomball Texas 77377
This is 11 shots with hammer Bullets from a .375cheytec at 100 yards... during a ladder test.. charge weights were 120gr up to 125 gr. Velocity was 2792 up to 2864. With a 395 gr bullet.View attachment 287847
That's what I like accuracy during load development just in case a monster buck walks across the range during development
 

Recent Posts

Top