What's faster at 100 Yards, higher or lower bullets?

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Treeslug

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Weatherby46 probably has an answer that will mystify us all because he/she is asking this question.
In a hypothetical test if everything was exactly the same with the barrel position and environmental conditions both bullets with the same weight/fps MV should hit the same spot due to gravitational pull. The bullet that hit higher would be going faster and have more MV in fps to escape the gravitational pull.
Love to hear the answer-gets us thinking.
Thanks
Len
Many, many moons ago when I was but a wee lad learning about reloading and bullet performance, I was taught that the faster bullet got out of the barrel faster than the slower bullet making the harmonics different from a faster to a slower bullet, though they are the same weight bullet. To make a long story short, I have never tested this theory in a rifle, but in my 10 mm Springfield 6 inch, 150s hit higher than 180s and 200 grain hit lowest of all. They all leave the barrel at different speeds, but the pattern is always the same. Different loads--Different POI. Just sayin'. But there is still recoil and range to consider!
 
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340PR

340PR

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shoot 5-10 shot groups, recording velocity and point of impact on each shot. Unless it is one raged hole, you will have your answer.
 
WildRose

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Recoil happens while the bullet is still in the barrel.

Heavier bullet = more recoil.

So heavier bullet impacts higher.

All else equal. :)
Only a portion of recoil happens while the bullet is still in the chamber.

The Reason Muzzle Breaks work is by redirecting the hot gasses and powder that is behind that bullet. The best of them can reduce recoil by as much as 70%.

The "Rocket Motor" effect of all that hot flaming gas is a very real thing.
 
H

Hawk in WY

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Only a portion of recoil happens while the bullet is still in the chamber.

The Reason Muzzle Breaks work is by redirecting the hot gasses and powder that is behind that bullet. The best of them can reduce recoil by as much as 70%.

The "Rocket Motor" effect of all that hot flaming gas is a very real thing.
You might have missed the point.

The "rocket motor" effect is very real (in addition to the Newton effect) but the point is the bullet is still in the barrel (not the chamber) during recoil. That causes the barrel to rise in most cases and throws a heavier bullet high.
 
WildRose

WildRose

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You might have missed the point.

The "rocket motor" effect is very real (in addition to the Newton effect) but the point is the bullet is still in the barrel (not the chamber) during recoil. That causes the barrel to rise in most cases and throws a heavier bullet high.

If that were true, breaks specifically designed to counter the portion of muzzle flip that comes from the rocket motor effect would not be at all effective.

That's why the best MB's don't just shoot the gasses straight out to the sides, they are also redirecting a portion of it upward by the size, angle, or position of the gas ports.
 
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Hawk in WY

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Muzzle brakes are effective as we all know. They are effective for the reason you state.

But because the bullet seals the barrel, the bullet is ahead of those gases. The recoil of importance here is the Newton effect (equal and opposite forces) that is the source of the initial recoil. What you are describing is no less real but occurs after the bullet has left the bore and releases the following gases.

I'm guessing I should not be arguing with someone with 12,669 posts. Out.
 
WildRose

WildRose

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Muzzle brakes are effective as we all know. They are effective for the reason you state.

But because the bullet seals the barrel, the bullet is ahead of those gases. The recoil of importance here is the Newton effect (equal and opposite forces) that is the source of the initial recoil. What you are describing is no less real but occurs after the bullet has left the bore and releases the following gases.

I'm guessing I should not be arguing with someone with 12,669 posts. Out.

But again, we've seen measured performance comparisons showing up to 70% reductions in recoil effects in the most efficient brakes.

They can't do that if the bulk of recoil occurs prior to the bullet exiting the barrel.

This is the same reason snub nose handguns are notoriously heavy in recoil compared to longer barreled handguns shooting the exact same loads. If again, it were primarily due to what happens inside the barrel, that would not be the case.
 
Swamplord

Swamplord

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Weatherby46 probably has an answer that will mystify us all because ?? "" HE/SHE "" ?? is asking this question.
In a hypothetical test if everything was exactly the same with the barrel position and environmental conditions both bullets with the same weight/fps MV should hit the same spot due to gravitational pull. The bullet that hit higher would be going faster and have more MV in fps to escape the gravitational pull.
Love to hear the answer-gets us thinking.
Thanks
Len
Did you just assume their gender ?
What if it's a they/them ?

lmao !
 
Tulsa Reiner

Tulsa Reiner

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WBY460: it is time for you to tell us why you posed the question.
(You've had some wise answers, some funny answers, and some totally irrelevant answers.)
 
Snowboy

Snowboy

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What makes quite a difference? Not following ... just clarifying. Velocity or POI? Or my comment about dialing? Mil.vs MOA
That is the question. In my case it was only noticed at 100 yards shooting different loads of 180 grain different bullets which chrono'd different velocities. The slower one printed a slightly larger group 2" higher. I assumed that at longer ranges the opposite would be the case. I do not profess to know the cause but the gun shoots nice groups with the selected ammo. No flyers and no group movement between range sessions.
 
Rflshootr

Rflshootr

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Run the numbers on a ballistic calculator with a 200 zero...change the velocity, then look at the impact difference at 100.....that will give you the true answer.
 
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