What manual to get

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by codym, Jun 3, 2018.

  1. codym

    codym Active Member

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    Hello, I'm new to rifle reloading but been reloading shotshells for a long time. I need a manual to reference, does anyone have any suggestions? I will be loading for the 300 win mag, 6.5 creed, and I have plans for a 6.5 grendal gas gun in the future. Thanks
     
  2. Rhett Crider

    Rhett Crider Well-Known Member

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    Welcome Cody. I've only been reloading for a few years and mostly mag loads. I purchased by component manufactures that I use. Bullets-Sierra, Berger, Hornady, Nosler, Speer. The best investment in my opinion was QuickLOAD software. The manuals don't always use the powder you want to use so that's where QuickLOAD comes in.
    There are a lot of very experienced reloaders on LRH forum so you will get plenty of good info and advice. Get ready to spend some $$ though. It's a lot of enjoyment to me finding that perfect load.
     
  3. codym

    codym Active Member

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    Thanks Rhett, I will look into the quick load software.
     
  4. stirner

    stirner Active Member

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    If you are looking for a reference on the mechanics of reloading, I suggest getting the Hornady and Sierra manuals. They also include loading data for their bullets in most calibers. Accurateshooters.com and AR15.com are very good too, with some data. For load data only, go to the powder and bullet manufacturers' websites, or google the individual calibers, i.e. "300 win mag reload data".
     
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  5. codym

    codym Active Member

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    So I'm looking for load data. I'm not familiar with all the powders and primers for given bullets. I usually have a good idea of the bullet/brass I want to start with but powders and primers not so much.
     
  6. ShtrRdy

    ShtrRdy Well-Known Member

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    I like the Lyman manual for reloading technique and info. For reloading info if you already know how to reload, Hodgdon and Nosler wesites have some good info. Hodgdon represents IMR, Winchester, and Hodgdon brands.
     
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  7. kiwikid

    kiwikid Well-Known Member

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    Hi Codym, Stirner has given you some very good advise. I have been reloading for 40 odd years and have shelves full of reloading manuals. In addition to the manuals that Stirner suggested I would also suggest the Lyman manual. Lyman don't make projectiles or powder so they suggest loads for the likes of Sierra, Speer, Hornady and Nosler projectiles using a large range of powders and tend to be unbiased in their loads. Norma is another manual I would recommend, although it only contains Norma powders they do use a range of manufacturers projectiles. It has a wealth of information on powder and primer types and uses and explains the dangers of reduced magnum powder charges. Starting low, working up slow is the way to go!
    Safe loading!
     
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  8. codym

    codym Active Member

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    Good deal, thanks guys. Ive been on here quite a bit and the info is very valuable.
     
  9. CMP70306

    CMP70306 Well-Known Member

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    While I’ve only been reloading about 6 years now I’ll share some info I’ve learned over the years.

    - When starting a new load I like to spread out all of my manuals plus look at online sites like Hodgdon Reloading center and Ammo Guide. I then take a look at all the different powders and draw a consensus among them for the best powder and charge weight choice.

    - If you have a specific bullet you want to shoot buy the manual for that company as there are some small differences in the bullets that can lead to big changes in pressure. If the load in the manufacturers book is much different than the rest of the books err on the side of caution and work up slow.

    - If you want to get really in-depth QuickLOAD is the way to go as it can be tweaked for the most comprehensive results. It gives you a way to change a multitude of variables to tune it to reflect your actual rifles performance in a way that regular manuals can’t. My only complaint is that it doesn’t have Superformance powder and I use Superformance in a number of cartridges. Other than that it is one of the best $150 I’ve ever spent and saves me a bunch of money by having an idea of the performance before I send a bunch of rounds down range.
     
  10. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Loading manuals have recipes for different loads that should be followed to the letter so mistakes are not made. there should be no substatutes in componants ether. The use of a manual is a must in my opinion for anyone (I have been loading for over fifty years and refer to them constantly) I also recomend One printed by a bullet manufacture because they will show most powders with there bullets. And one manual from a powder manufacture to show different bullets with there powders. This gives you many choices.

    There are many good loading manuals and depending on your need and style of shooting you will have to decide which one. Most bullet makers and powder makers have a load data that is available on line that is also very usefull. I like the quickload program, but it is a prediction and only as good as the data input.

    For safe reloading don't use someone elses load because it may not work in your rifle. (All rifles are not created equial) use the loads listed in the manuals and never start with a maximum load.

    Reloading can/is fun and can be very rewarding but can also be dangerous so be careful and dont get distracted while loading. good luck.

    J E CUSTOM
     
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  11. dig

    dig Well-Known Member

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    Sierra has been he most comprehensive information for loads. and they will send you updates on specific calibers as they change (by request). The manual is in notebook fashion so easy to add. The Folks at Sierra are always very helpful, I have called a couple times over the years and they are more than willing to help. Lyman book is a great starter for technique and process.
     
  12. jrock

    jrock Well-Known Member

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    I have the nosler, speer, hornady, and berger books. Lots of good info in all but wish there was a book with all the reloading step/instruction information in one book. I think its wise to get a book from the manufacture of the bullets you shoot. Then get the reloading data online for the powder manufacture to compare. I was sifting through my books the other night looking for 10mm Auto information and noted that the charges were all over the place between manufactures of powder and bullets. This is pretty typical and that is why I like to have many points of reference to start low and work up.
     
  13. MagnumManiac

    MagnumManiac Well-Known Member

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    I like to reference the BULLET manufacturers manual FIRST, then the POWDER manufacturer if I don’t find the powder listed I want to try in the first manual.
    I often use powders that NO manuals list in cartridges that are overbore.
    This is often an educated guess as to a start load and the Powley computer is a huge help in most instances.

    I have several manuals from Speer, Nosler, Alliant, ADI/Thales/Hodgdon, Lee & Berger. Oh, I have the Woodleigh manual too.

    Cheers.
    :)
     
  14. RT2506

    RT2506 Well-Known Member

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    I have been loading over 40 years and I have used the Sierra manuals to great effect probably the most. Their suggested accuracy loads are pretty much spot on so you don't have to do a bunch of different powders. As with any loading you MUST start low on your powder charge and work up WITH THE COMPONENTS YOU WILL BE USING. A manual is just a guideline and no two rifles are the same and even if you follow the data to the letter you are not using the same lot of components that they used. I have found that a chronograph is an indispensable tool when doing load work up to let you know what YOUR weapon is doing with a load. A lot of the data that is in the loading books are done up in pressure barrels that have minimum chamber specks and often much longer barrels than are common on regular rifles. Thus they reach pressure faster than your rifle may and you have to take into account the difference in velocity of barrel lengths. Then you have to take into count that different manuals will have VASTLY DIFFERENT data even with basically the same components. So the warning of "Always start low and work up, and if you change any component back off and work up again, is sound advice. If you want 6.5 Grendel data and advice go to the 6.5 Grendel forum on the net and sign up. You can also find to purchase a 6.5 Grendel specific load book there. I would suggest that you only get book #2 instead of both books unless you just want to get the lowdown on how the Grendel came about. The #2 about copies a lot of what is in #1 but has lots of tested data. I have two 6.5 Grendel ARs and really enjoy them. In my experience the 6.5 Grendel is probable the best all around caliber for the AR 15 platform.