What I have…….and what I need?

DJ Morrison

Active Member
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
43
Location
Wyoming
the other thing about a bipod, it's hard to get it in and out of the scabbard. I like to carry a smaller pack when on a horse and i hang it on the horn of the saddle opposite side of my rifle so it stays in balance...Its handy to get things out of and keeps you riding in balance. I also use my own set of saddle bags...If you have friends with chaps, see if you can borrow a set to go, its easier on your legs and clothing when going around trees and brush, you are riding in the dark, things can get bumped into and ripping your camo or rain gear can get costly...
 

isaaccarlson

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Joined
May 11, 2011
Messages
177
Location
NW Wisconsin
Having been at 12,000+ft, I would not want to pack a lot of stuff. It's fun running around up there, at least it was for me. It isn't a boy scout camp. I don't use pillows anymore, just a shirt or coat. My sleeping bag has a hood on it that works great for making a pillow.

I would wear the lightest footwear you can get away with, because weight on your feet will wear you down more than anything else. Have a nice wide padded sling on your rifle. A fanny pack is nice for quick access items.

I have more fun when I pack light. I was supposed to go elk hunting in utah this year, but had too much going on. I would have taken my rifle, a box of ammo, a knife or two, a lighter, my shoes, a couple changes of clothes, a jacket, flashlight/batteries, maybe a sleeping bag, and a thermos. Thats about it.

There isn't much at 12k anyway as far as firewood or critters. I was at 12500 several years ago and was WAY above the tree line. Just rocks and grass/moss and clouds. We were above them and that was COOL!
 

Starlite

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Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
728
Location
New Brunswick Canada
I've spent weeks hunting out of a wall tent and believe me take some chap stick and moisture creme for dry hands/lips. If it stays cold you only need a few changes of underwear, socks and another set of cloths, moccasins for camp. I only wear Merlino wool medium/heavy underwear, no synthetics. As unpredictable as Colorado weather can be you could be hunting in a tee shirt, long sleeve of course. Good luck.
Lol. Chap stix.

So I never share any of my “war stories” however I’ve been released for a few years now so..if you’ll allow me.
Was doing some winter warfare training in Wainwright Albert Canada for a mission overseas.
It was a six person squad. Lead trail-breaker 3 pulling the the toboggan. Commander steering and a rear sentry. So..one of our guys in the team really wasn’t a team player. To be honest he was just plain lazy as a cut dog.

One evening this lazy guy came into the tent smacking his lips and padding his pockets like he was looking for something.


At this time I’ll steer you to where this is going. Our commander had some bad hemorrhoids that were flared from all the rations he was eating. Everyone in our squad knew this..well those that were paying attention. We also knew that our commander had chap stix wrapped in green guntape to help with the rhoids. He also had a regular chap stix for his lips. LET ME TELL YOU WHEN THIS LAZY FELLA CAME INTO TENT AND ASKED IF ANYONE HAD A SPARE CHAP-STIX.

WE ALL LOOKED AT THE COMMANDER. (As he had enough of the guy being a sac of scat). it was like I (and the others) were watching the commander; this glowing green guntaped chap-stix being taken out of his shirt pocket with, you know..the look the grinch gives in the Christmas classic. “Yeah (I’ll call him Joe) I’ve got a second stix and threw the green one over. We all just sat as quiet as a church mouse while this Chap-stix arose out of it’s tube looking like a tasteful hallmark moment. Across the lips like a prom queen. Then out of the still air Joe said “this taste like shi$. Well I’m sure we gave away our position to the enemy but it was one of the best laughs we had that entire time. Joe didn’t even know what we were laughing 😂 at. We’re like Joe all the commander has been talking about this week was his hemorrhoid s and how the chap-stix was a life saver.
Morel of this story is always carry 2 stix on hunting trips. You never know when “that guy” will need one.
That’s the best advice I can offer. Good luck
“Fail to Plan -Plan to Fail”
 

Tulsa Reiner

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Joined
Jan 6, 2014
Messages
504
Location
Tulsa, OK
Where’s your pack? I would think you’d want at least a day pack and possibly something that has the ability to strap your rifle to and for packing meat. And I’d lose the bipod for carbon trekking poles. They’ll come in handy for glassing and make good shooting sticks. Prone you can shoot off your pack. I’ll second the moleskin and camp shoes over extra boots. You’re used to sitting in a blind. You will be hiking up and down steep terrain and it punishes your feet.
^^^^^
I would strongly second the rec for a 1200 cu in to 2000 cu in day pack, with survival gear and a place to stow the clothes you take off as the day warms up.
For carrying your rifle, get something like Kuiu's rifle boot. It is two pieces that attach to the top and bottom of the daypack, and lets you carry the rifle in the center of the daypack. Believe me, carrying your rifle in your hand or slung on your shoulders gets old real fast when you're climbing in the mountains.
 

Tulsa Reiner

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Joined
Jan 6, 2014
Messages
504
Location
Tulsa, OK
If you're expecting blisters which you might not be but you should, buy some Leukotape from Amazon. Stuff is amazing and its not overly expensive, its the best stuff I've found for blisters, put it on as soon as you start feeling a hotspot, put it over the hotspot and leave it there until you leave or the stuff starts coming off which it should last a week or so.

Chav: I've never heard of Leukotape, but am taking your advice and ordered it for my sheep hunt next year.
 

Tulsa Reiner

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Joined
Jan 6, 2014
Messages
504
Location
Tulsa, OK
I would STRONGLY urge each of you to carry a CAT (combat application tourniquet), Gen 3 or 7, and a Quick Clot compression bandage. They can save someone's life.
You should each practice applying the tourniquet with one hand (it's easy to apply with two hands), in case you need to apply it to one of your own arms. It is ok to open the package of the tourniquet and practice. In the event of a major artery injury; you have only about 1 minute to get the tourniquet out of the daypack and applied before you pass out.
Don't open the compression bandage because the contents are sterile.
The ones I have weigh 7 oz, together.
You can have them in a day or two via Amazon.
Good luck, stay safe, and drop a big one.
 

Bravo 4

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Joined
Jul 20, 2007
Messages
4,150
Location
The South
Unknowingly I end up taking more outer clothes than I wear, usually double. I do take under garments for each day, no matter how cold I end up sweating a bit from walking/climbing. I will separate and tightly roll each day’s undies, socks, t-shirt into a ziplock. Prior to doing so I spray them down with scent killer spray and let them fully dry. This is in case I find myself not changing each morning. I do usually carry extra socks with me during the daytime. I will also spray down some outer garments, boots, and pack with water proofing days prior.
Don’t know if it was mentioned but a small water filtration system of sorts.
 

Tulsa Reiner

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2014
Messages
504
Location
Tulsa, OK
Unknowingly I end up taking more outer clothes than I wear, usually double. I do take under garments for each day, no matter how cold I end up sweating a bit from walking/climbing. I will separate and tightly roll each day’s undies, socks, t-shirt into a ziplock. Prior to doing so I spray them down with scent killer spray and let them fully dry. This is in case I find myself not changing each morning. I do usually carry extra socks with me during the daytime. I will also spray down some outer garments, boots, and pack with water proofing days prior.
Don’t know if it was mentioned but a small water filtration system of sorts.
Speaking of water filtration, carry a Steripen. I tshines UV light into a 1 liter bottle (Nalgene) and sterilizes it in 90 seconds. Weighs maybe 1 ounce.
 

WYO300RUM

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Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Messages
1,856
Location
Wyoming
October 9th I’m leaving for my first elk hunt in Colorado. We’ll be hunting with a guide at 12,000 feet and are limited to 40lbs that we can pack into camp minuses rifle and sleeping bag. I hunt in the east from stands/blinds so I had to buy a lot of new packable clothing and don’t have any way to field test it before I leave. Most of what I have is light to mid weight and layers nice (up to 4 layers is comfortable). I have a total of 6 tops and 6 bottoms (plus a light set of long Johns for sleeping) ranging from Sitka, Kuiu, Browning and Cabalas. I was wondering if I should try to cut down on some other stuff to add more clothing. Here’s a list of what I’m planning on taking:
1 Accu Tac bipod 1lbs 4oz
1 box ammo 1lbs 8oz
1 boo boo bag (Advil, bandaids etc.) ….1lb
1 Leupold 10x42 binoculars 1lbs 13oz
1 thermos 1lbs
1 pillow 1lbs
1 personal hygiene bag 2lbs 2oz
Hand/foot warmers 2lbs 10oz
1 battery charger for phone, flashlight and headlamp 2lbs
1 headlamp 7oz
1 flashlight 5oz
1 knife 7oz
1 rangefinder 6oz
1 pair extra boots 3lbs 5oz
Socks, hats and gloves 2lbs 8oz
1 pair sunglasses in hard case 6oz
3 power bars (just incase) 8oz
1 fire starter kit 8oz
1 emergency Bivy 9oz
That’s around 24lbs and my clothes weigh in around 18lbs so I think I’m close enough since I plan on wearing some of the clothes riding in. Is there anything I should change, add, subtract?
…….I forgot to add the packable rain gear. I didn’t weigh it but I think it’s less then a pound…….
Thanks in advance.
I'm pretty sure Co. has hunter orange square inch requirement . I haven't hunted there since 1995. Ut. does also. Wy. one piece of clothing. A hat a vest, etc.. Nv., Az., N.M. and Ca. Nada. I doubt you will find elk at 12k unless they are eating rocks. Maybe 10k but most likely 7 to 9k. More grass/feed and trees . The like them to hide in , shade and weather protection. Just my 2 cents. Your gonna have a blast and good luck.
 

Starlite

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Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
728
Location
New Brunswick Canada
Full vest and a hat in CO. No camo patterned orange allowed. For some reason they allow hunter pink as well as orange.
Our province (NB) just started allowing camo orange vest /jacket but IIR not the hat. Although it can have a small logo on the front. We’re slow to change here. Also new this year; once you tag out for your Bear and or dear you can continue to hunt Varmint with same (or higher) caliber. In the past you had to drop down to a 223 or smaller caliber.
 

Blacklab1

Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2021
Messages
14
Location
Pa.
Thanks for everyone's input, I got a lot of good info. I did cut back on some things and added others. I'm under my weight limit and feel I'm a little more prepared. I am curious to see what altitude we'll actually be hunting at. I do have another question though.......what's good enough shape to be in? I'm 53 170 pounds @ 5' 8", I average about 5 walking miles a day working construction and when I get home I try to put in another 2 to 3 miles with 30 to 35 pounds in my pack. I live at about 2000 feet and it's not flat but the hills aren't steep, there's a construction site about a mile from my house with some pretty good sized dirt piles the earth movers built that I climb up and down with my pack and as much clothes as weather allows (it was 80* today). Unfortunately I smoked since high school but for the most part quit about a year ago. Does it sound like I'm close or am I going to be laying on a rock gasping for air?
 
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