What I have…….and what I need?

BJC>HntTx

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2021
Messages
8
Location
Centex
Just my opinion, as others have said, lose the extra boots. A good pair of danners should last fine. I opt for hiking sandals as camp shoes. Personally I believe that is way overpacking for clothes. Get your layers together and be done with it ( I usually will take one extra base layer). Tip here: wool will not start stinking for 3 or 4 days (I consider wool socks(carry plenty) and base layers a must) I cant really say much about your personal hygiene stuff as I do not know if you have medical needs etc. However, I usually carry a travel toothbrush and paste and tiny deodorant and lip balm. less than 1/2 lb. No pillow needed, wad up a shirt or something. I use to carry booboo bag but I don't anymore. I carry 1 small roll of athletic tape to close up any bigger wounds and that should get you out of woods. Fully guided they will have what you need anyway. Of course, if your just heading in to a base camp and not going to be toting around weight then it really doesn't matter. You can carry whatever will keep you comfortable. The experience can be quite amazing if you prepare to hurt some and just enjoy fighting through the pain. Have fun and find a good 'un. Let us know how it goes.
 

Beer Baron

Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
23
Location
Colorado
Been hunting elk in CO for 20 years and never needed a bipod. For me camp shoes are a must and any slip on shoes work for me. It is a real pain wearing boots around camp, especially when relieving yourself at night. I bring two sets of boots, one pair of heavy duty hikers (Kenetrek, Crispis) one pair of high-top trail running shoes and normally hike 8-12 miles a day. A good set of gaiters is always in my gear. I always keep rain gear in my pack and almost never use it. It does work well as a shell if the wind picks up on an evening stand, temps and the sun drop fast in the mountains. I wear the same outer garments up to 3 days and change my base layer daily. Wipes are indispensable in camp and in my pack. I don't own trekking poles but will buy one this year since so many people suggested it. Try to get to camp early if possible to adjust to the altitude and drink plenty of water as many have suggested. I live at over 5000 ft but I don't sleep well above 8000 ft, just something to consider. If you need any more info let me know and I hope you enjoy your hunt and fill your tag.
 

jepp2

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2012
Messages
12
Location
Rocky Mtns
I live in CO and have elk hunted many years. A couple of items I wouldn't go on the hunt without:

- I wear a lanyard around my neck. On the lanyard is a whistle and a liquid filled compass I know how to use
- Topo maps for the area I'm going to hunt, that have been coated to waterproof them (or alternative).

And yes, I have my GPS with the maps loaded on it. But I don't want to have to count on it working 100%, stuff happens. Weather can set in pretty quickly, and all your references can be lost. With my compass I never have to worry about getting to where I want to go.

I know you have a guide, but you never know what he needs to do with a 2 on 1 hunt, to best maximize both of your chances of success.

I also always hunt with eye protection on. Mainly for when I fire my rifle, but also to keep from getting your eye whipped by a spruce limb when you are riding on horseback in the dark. I wear amber early and late, tint during the day.
 

436

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Messages
1,255
Location
NorthWest
Perhaps someone already said it but something to signal directionally with, in the daytime and a small pocket knife.
 

flassen

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2012
Messages
53
Just a suggestion, if you buy Carhartt clothing, try to stay away from the color that Carhartt uses that is Elk butt color. It can get you shot by incompetent hunters. It shows up a long way off and you could be mistaken for an Elk. I have experience with this issue.
 

Starlite

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
728
Location
New Brunswick Canada
Sounds like the guide cleans the animal? Gut bag is a lot of weight if you don’t have to carry it in.

I hunt elk at 10k feet in CO about every year.
I take:
a rifle and half a box of ammo.
Sunglasses.
Chapstick.
Binoculars, rangefinder, and small camelback day bag with water, food, lighter, and fire starting material. Alternatively, an eberlestock rifle bag with water bladder and supplies if the terrain is going to require me to stow the rifle.
1 high end aluminum trekking pole. Used for hiking and as a stabilizer/shooting stick.
Snowshoes if necessary. More relevant late season.
1 pair of boots, and 3 pair of excellent socks. 1 spare boot lace.
Whatever underwear you think is enough.
2 sets of thermals.
1 pair camp shoes.
Orange baseball hat and warm orange toque. You’ll need the toque in the morning and the baseball cap during the day.
Orange vest.
2 pair camo pants, 2 short and 2 long sleeve camo shirt.
2 camo jackets, one heavy and one light.
Clothes get aired out and hung up if possible in between uses.
Carhart coveralls, brown. I will hunt with these on instead of camo almost always. But sometimes it’s too hot for them.
A good set of thinly insulated gloves.
Good pillow, good bag, good tent, catalytic heater, ground pad.
Camp stove and fuel.
Dopp bag.
Suture kit, bandaids, ibuprofen.
Small bottle of good whiskey.
Water and food for the duration. Or the means to acquire what I need.
Radios for communicating with the group if we need help or have an animal down.
1 flashlight, 1 headlamp.
Phones stay off while hunting, so no need for an electrical charger.
Gut bag consisting of gloves, ziplock for the heart, 3 very sharp knives, zip tie and pen for the tag, marking tape and a glow stick.

I don’t mess with rain gear that time of year. If the rain is moving in, I’m hightailing it back to camp.

Edit to add: wet wipes and a small towel.
I see you bring whiskey. Have you ever tried the powdered alcohol packets? Much lighter to carry. I way given several packets once while at a whiskey tasting festival. I was impressed with the quality of the product. IIR they were all mixed drinks but couldn’t tell you their names. Did get a little buzzed though.
 

Joe Bishop

Active Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2015
Messages
44
I've spent weeks hunting out of a wall tent and believe me take some chap stick and moisture creme for dry hands/lips. If it stays cold you only need a few changes of underwear, socks and another set of cloths, moccasins for camp. I only wear Merlino wool medium/heavy underwear, no synthetics. As unpredictable as Colorado weather can be you could be hunting in a tee shirt, long sleeve of course. Good luck.
 

Idaho Lefty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2018
Messages
692
Have you "adjusted" your Ballistic's on your Rifle's Scope and Velocity of, your Load, FOR,.. Elevation / Temp's ?
I Zero at 3,300 Feet, and about 70 Degrees, Temp, but my scope "Dial", is set for 6,500 Ft. and 40 Degrees for,.. WHERE / when, I Hunt.
Most Elk, in Colorado are LOWER than you'd think, "maybe",. about, 7,500 to 10,000 Feet,.. Max. !
Adjust, your, "ballistics" for, 8,500 Feet "average", 40 degrees, Temp,.. IMHO.
Agree with others, LOSE, the Bi-Pod ( Colorado Hillsides, are Steep ! ) So I'd use, "Sticks", and a Clothes, stuffed Pack with, a small, Lite weight, "Toe" rest, for Prone.. Good Luck, stay SAFE and,.. have Fun !
 
Last edited:

BJC>HntTx

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2021
Messages
8
Location
Centex
Have you "adjusted" your Ballistic's on your Rifle's Scope and Velocity of, your Load, FOR,.. Elevation / Temp's ?
I Zero at 3,300 Feet, and about 70 Degrees, Temp, but my scope "Dial", is set for 6,500 Ft. and 40 Degrees for,.. WHERE / when, I Hunt.
Most Elk, in Colorado are LOWER than you'd think, "maybe",. about, 7,500 to 10,000 Feet,.. Max. !
Adjust, your, "ballistics" for, 8,500 Feet "average", 40 degrees, Temp,.. IMHO.
Agree with others, LOSE, the Bi-Pod ( Colorado Hillsides, are Steep ! ) So I'd use, "Sticks", and a Clothes, stuffed Pack with, a small, Lite "Toe" rest for Prone.. Good Luck, stay SAFE and,.. have Fun !
Im gonna 3rd or 4th or whatever the bipod. Hauled one around for a couple of years and not sure i ever used the **** thing in reality. A simple monopod/trekker works great especially when combined with a tree trunk or something. On ground throw down the pack and send it!.
 

OldDutch

Active Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2021
Messages
37
Location
Colorado
Perhaps I'm missing something here. On this forum we post a lot about safety. How in the world is walking around in the hunting world with a totally brown overall safe?

People get shot over far less.

You must have missed the orange in the list. Or maybe I confused the issue. I wear the vest and hat.
I see you bring whiskey. Have you ever tried the powdered alcohol packets? Much lighter to carry. I way given several packets once while at a whiskey tasting festival. I was impressed with the quality of the product. IIR they were all mixed drinks but couldn’t tell you their names. Did get a little buzzed though.
I’ve considered the powder. Never tried it though.
Im gonna 3rd or 4th or whatever the bipod. Hauled one around for a couple of years and not sure i ever used the **** thing in reality. A simple monopod/trekker works great especially when combined with a tree trunk or something. On ground throw down the pack and send it!.
I shot my pronghorn last weekend using a pack. A pack makes a great rifle rest.
 

kiwi49

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2014
Messages
85
Location
Carterton, New Zealand
Don't forget a registered PLB (Personal Locator Beacon). New one's are light, easy to operate and cost effective.
These save a lot of hunter/hunter group lives here in New Zealand.
 

pooldoc

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2012
Messages
57
Location
Opelousas,LA
Take a camera. Beautiful country! Get a Rx for Diamox to take for Altitude Sickness. It can be brutal and being in shape is no defense it just takes time to get acclimated to the lower level of oxygen. Be sure to have good sunglasses. You're likely to have snow at that altitude and it can be blinding. Take a sturdy pair of gaiters to keep snow out of your boots. Last, but not least take sunscreen. I lived in Colorado for 8 years and my house was at 10,600 ft. Just take it easy and don't push yourself. Good luck.
 

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