What I have…….and what I need?

OldDutch

Active Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2021
Messages
37
Location
Colorado
Sounds like the guide cleans the animal? Gut bag is a lot of weight if you don’t have to carry it in.

I hunt elk at 10k feet in CO about every year.
I take:
a rifle and half a box of ammo.
Sunglasses.
Chapstick.
Binoculars, rangefinder, and small camelback day bag with water, food, lighter, and fire starting material. Alternatively, an eberlestock rifle bag with water bladder and supplies if the terrain is going to require me to stow the rifle.
1 high end aluminum trekking pole. Used for hiking and as a stabilizer/shooting stick.
Snowshoes if necessary. More relevant late season.
1 pair of boots, and 3 pair of excellent socks. 1 spare boot lace.
Whatever underwear you think is enough.
2 sets of thermals.
1 pair camp shoes.
Orange baseball hat and warm orange toque. You’ll need the toque in the morning and the baseball cap during the day.
Orange vest.
2 pair camo pants, 2 short and 2 long sleeve camo shirt.
2 camo jackets, one heavy and one light.
Clothes get aired out and hung up if possible in between uses.
Carhart coveralls, brown. I will hunt with these on instead of camo almost always. But sometimes it’s too hot for them.
A good set of thinly insulated gloves.
Good pillow, good bag, good tent, catalytic heater, ground pad.
Camp stove and fuel.
Dopp bag.
Suture kit, bandaids, ibuprofen.
Small bottle of good whiskey.
Water and food for the duration. Or the means to acquire what I need.
Radios for communicating with the group if we need help or have an animal down.
1 flashlight, 1 headlamp.
Phones stay off while hunting, so no need for an electrical charger.
Gut bag consisting of gloves, ziplock for the heart, 3 very sharp knives, zip tie and pen for the tag, marking tape and a glow stick.

I don’t mess with rain gear that time of year. If the rain is moving in, I’m hightailing it back to camp.

Edit to add: wet wipes and a small towel.
 
Last edited:

Highlander44

Active Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2014
Messages
30
Location
Calgary Alberta
Sounds like the guide cleans the animal? Gut bag is a lot of weight if you don’t have to carry it in.

I hunt elk at 10k feet in CO about every year.
I take:
a rifle and half a box of ammo.
Sunglasses.
Chapstick.
Binoculars, rangefinder, and small camelback day bag with water, food, lighter, and fire starting material. Alternatively, an eberlestock rifle bag with water bladder and supplies if the terrain is going to require me to stow the rifle.
1 high end aluminum trekking pole. Used for hiking and as a stabilizer/shooting stick.
Snowshoes if necessary. More relevant late season.
1 pair of boots, and 3 pair of excellent socks. 1 spare boot lace.
Whatever underwear you think is enough.
2 sets of thermals.
1 pair camp shoes.
Orange baseball hat and warm orange toque. You’ll need the toque in the morning and the baseball cap during the day.
Orange vest.
2 pair camo pants, 2 short and 2 long sleeve camo shirt.
2 camo jackets, one heavy and one light.
Clothes get aired out and hung up if possible in between uses.
Carhart coveralls, brown. I will hunt with these on instead of camo almost always. But sometimes it’s too hot for them.
A good set of thinly insulated gloves.
Good pillow, good bag, good tent, catalytic heater, ground pad.
Camp stove and fuel.
Dopp bag.
Suture kit, bandaids, ibuprofen.
Small bottle of good whiskey.
Water and food for the duration. Or the means to acquire what I need.
Radios for communicating with the group if we need help or have an animal down.
1 flashlight, 1 headlamp.
Phones stay off while hunting, so no need for an electrical charger.
Gut bag consisting of gloves, ziplock for the heart, 3 very sharp knives, zip tie and pen for the tag, marking tape and a glow stick.

I don’t mess with rain gear that time of year. If the rain is moving in, I’m hightailing it back to camp.

Edit to add: wet wipes and a small towel
List looks pretty good, you have any need for an inreach? How about GPS and a small paper map?
A note on carhart - That is all I wear day to day, but if you get them wet- they take forever and a day to dry…..
 

BrentM

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2013
Messages
3,231
Location
Meridian, Idaho
6 tops and bottoms? Is this base and outer layers, all clothing?

For me, extra boots. 2 pants max. 1 Base layer top and bottom. 1 mid weight top. Puffy vest. puffy jacket. puffy coat. Rain set.

12K. Doesn't seem right. That is nose bleed altitude and most elk aren't that high right now. We are into elk every day right at 7000-8500 and over that, there isn't anything up high.
 

chav0_12

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2011
Messages
217
Location
Ronan MT
Is your battery charger a small generator that weighs 2lbs? What's going on there? Your hygiene kit weighs 2lbs. on its own plus you have a boo-boo kit that weighs a pound. What's in those things? Trust me you don't need everything you think you need. My "boo-boo kit' and hygiene kit are one plus I carry other extra things in there and it weighs a little more than a pound. What exactly does your clothing system look like? why does that weigh 18lbs?
 
Last edited:

cvixx

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2012
Messages
48
My perspective. Just got back from walking 200+ miles on the Camino de Santiago in Spain, so some recent experience. Not 12K feet but the Pyrenees are nothing to sneeze at. I used one pole. Two take up both hands,which I don’t like. Mostly used for downhills to control speed and save my knees.

For blisters, Lanacaine helps beforehand, as do the right size socks. Make sure there are no loose areas which can rub. I also use latex toe caps because that is where the blisters are for me. eBay has them, should get to you in time. I drain blisters, rub on 3in 1 antibiotic and bandage. Carry an assortment of bandaids, including those designed for toes.
 

DJ Morrison

Active Member
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
42
Location
Wyoming
Make sure if this is your first time at that elevation, you drink plenty of water. double what you normally do, because your kidneys are going to produce double the output for the first few days!! Watch your alcohol input as it stimulates adhd hormone which as we know causes us to pee more so if you are not careful you will get dehydrated....I am fair skinned so i always have sunscreen along..A pad to put your butt on is just a really nice luxury if you have the weight room...Also a light weight hammock to take afternoon naps while away from camp...Monkey butt powder is also a nicety....
 

chav0_12

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2011
Messages
217
Location
Ronan MT
If you're expecting blisters which you might not be but you should, buy some Leukotape from Amazon. Stuff is amazing and its not overly expensive, its the best stuff I've found for blisters, put it on as soon as you start feeling a hotspot, put it over the hotspot and leave it there until you leave or the stuff starts coming off which it should last a week or so.

 

Kendoist4162

Active Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2012
Messages
39
If you’re going with buddies, you can share some items. Make sure batteries are common amongst yourselves. ditch the spare boots and take a much lighter pair of camp shoes. Crocs are cliche but light AF. Good luck at 12k you’re gonna feel like crap at that altitude. Hydrate, hydrate hydrate.
 

RH300UM

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2008
Messages
1,384
Location
Southeast Idaho
Just a suggestion at 12k you will need to be acclimated for altitude. I’ve seen a few guys get real sick and have to go down low as fast as possible. Try and get to an area that you have some altitude 2-3 days before you head up to hunt.
12k feet in October for elk? I’m not sure about that but your outfitter should know.
Drink a lot of water. Don’t wait till your thirsty. Don’t be like a lot of guys and not drink water before you go to bed because they don’t want to get up during the night to pee. This has a cumulative affect and slows you down on the hunt.
Be very mindful the first few days of over exerting yourself. The bodies abilities to recover are reduced at altitude.
I’d cut down the gear weight some and get some puffy gear( pants,coat). The new hydrophobic down is outstanding. I’d loose the bipod and take trekking poles instead.
Duct tape for blisters and gear repairs.
Loose the pillow and stuff a puffy jacket or pants in a stuff sack at night for your pillow.
Dry socks every night before you get in your bag will make sleeping much more enjoyable.
Be safe and enjoy the trip. Let us know how it goes for you when you get back
 

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