What am I doing wrong with sizing brass?

P7M13

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Found my example of seating a bullet causing shoulder bulge:
20200920_095101.jpg
So I was at the range this morning and everything chambered fine.
stay with your procedure, sell the gauge....
Thanks and I assume I should turn necks for this rifle to increase accuracy.
Not really. In most instances, a waste of time. That's a whole 'nuther debate.
 

Gone Ballistic

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Have you tried pulling the bullet out and measuring it's diameter? I had a similar problem like yours and found I had some deformed bullets that had a minuscule bulge on the side of some of them. Just enough for everything to get out of wack and throw the rest in my lead pot.
 

jgs8163

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Have you tried pulling the bullet out and measuring it's diameter? I had a similar problem like yours and found I had some deformed bullets that had a minuscule bulge on the side of some of them. Just enough for everything to get out of wack and throw the rest in my lead pot.
I did. All checked out fine. I’ve pretty much got it working just fine now. I seated the bullet a little deeper and the issue went away. Ordered a concentricity gage from Brownells. I think my issue have been the bullet being very slightly misaligned in the case when seated further out (not concentric). I am awaiting delivery of the gage to determine. Running the press 2 strokes when seating the bullet seemed to help also. 1st stroke to seat and then rotate case 1/2 turn and seat again.
 

Dean2

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I did. All checked out fine. I’ve pretty much got it working just fine now. I seated the bullet a little deeper and the issue went away. Ordered a concentricity gage from Brownells. I think my issue have been the bullet being very slightly misaligned in the case when seated further out (not concentric). I am awaiting delivery of the gage to determine. Running the press 2 strokes when seating the bullet seemed to help also.
I am glad you seem to have found the issue but I really have trouble understanding how your rounds were so far off concentric as to cause the neck to bind hard enough on the case guage as to limit it going in all the way. The double stroke seating method does however lend credence to that as the cause. Those must be some finely tuned case gauges or you were WAY off of being centered. Be interested to hear what you find when the concentricity gauge shows up.
 

jgs8163

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I am glad you seem to have found the issue but I really have trouble understanding how your rounds were so far off concentric as to cause the neck to bind hard enough on the case guage as to limit it going in all the way. The double stroke seating method does however lend credence to that as the cause. Those must be some finely tuned case gauges or you were WAY off of being centered. Be interested to hear what you find when the concentricity gauge shows up.
So the gage at one end is very close to the bullet diameter of .284. If the round was slightly not concentric after seating the bullet it would prevent it from going completely into the gage. The Hornady gage works testing just the brass as well as a loaded round. A little different from the Wilson gages. The Hornady gage is SAAMI spec.
 

MZmoose

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I would throw that gauge away unless you are loading rounds to minimum specs for several guns. You will likely get short case life if you're resizing down to min spec everytime. Bump the shoulder back .002" on your once fired brass (in that rifle) and toss the gauge. I have a 7mm RM with a long chamber. The new brass stretched .014" at the base to shoulder measurement. If I resize that to min spec everytime it won't last.
 

Its204fast

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Belted cases are known not to completely resize all the way down to the belt. Do a search on resizing belted magnum cases and read what Larry Willis has to say. What you are experiencing is not uncommon.
I have a 7mm and have had the BELT BULGE issue with close to 100 cases (I ended up trashing) I read about and researched the WILLIS BULGE BUSTER and think its probably a good product. on the other hand a lot of things Ive read, say belt bulge is indication of impending head separation. When I switch over to loading 7mm again, I am going to start with virgin brass and try again. I got really disgusted after loading about 20 that wouldn't chamber, one was snug closing the bolt not really concerning, however, after i fired it, i had to beat the bolt open with a mallet.
 

Dean2

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I have a 7mm and have had the BELT BULGE issue with close to 100 cases (I ended up trashing) I read about and researched the WILLIS BULGE BUSTER and think its probably a good product. on the other hand a lot of things Ive read, say belt bulge is indication of impending head separation. When I switch over to loading 7mm again, I am going to start with virgin brass and try again. I got really disgusted after loading about 20 that wouldn't chamber, one was snug closing the bolt not really concerning, however, after i fired it, i had to beat the bolt open with a mallet.
Start neck sizing you magnum belted cases and you won't have this probllem. If you FL size every time the brass has to go somewhere, and that is longer neck that needs trimming and a bulge just above the belt. I have 7 Rem and 300 WW cases with over 15 times fired, always neck sized, no issues with bulge, fit or anything else. They have also never been annealed.
 

Bob Wright

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I would throw that gauge away unless you are loading rounds to minimum specs for several guns. You will likely get short case life if you're resizing down to min spec everytime. Bump the shoulder back .002" on your once fired brass (in that rifle) and toss the gauge. I have a 7mm RM with a long chamber. The new brass stretched .014" at the base to shoulder measurement. If I resize that to min spec everytime it won't last.
This👆👆👆
 

RYEWSKY25284

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It does chamber. I don’t have that tool you mention but I imagine I will soon. Any good reads or a link you can share are appreciated.
If it chambers into your rifle and doesn't "feel" stiff closing the bolt, then maybe the bullet is bumping into the gauge. Clearly that is a VLD type of bullet. Tap it firmly into the gauge and see if it leaves a ring or a mark on the projectile/bullet. Simply seating the bullet shouldn't change the dimension of the case. If it does, then your neck tension is way too tight and would probably be shaving the bullets. IMO
 

Bob Wright

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Do you have a preferred die? I’ve got mostly Redding stuff now.
2 schools of thought generally. I use a Redding S FL bushing die to set the neck tension and FL size the case body, .002 bump. Nothing else. Mine are neck turned/reamed just for this die and specific bushing diameter.
Others get great results using a mandrel die to set the neck tension internally after FL sizing the body and sizing the neck down just enough for the mandrel to finish for .002-.003 neck tension generally. 2 operations here, FL then mandrel.
Most "one size fits all" SAAMI spec dies that FL and use an expander ball/button, over-work the brass, especially if the brass is thicker on the neck. This leads to early cartridge demise and velocity issues.
I neck turn all my brass for consistency and work the brass less. I have tight chambers done on custom rifles. I have no choice but to fit the brass for .004 diametral clearance (loaded round) at the neck. Annealing is a big plus.
Neck turning is only needed once for the life of the brass.
 

Blackhawk

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In my opinion just because a brass cartridge case fits in a case gage does not indicate that your brass is headspaced to your chambers dimensions. Remember stacked tolerances.
I would try to adjust your full length resizing die to reduce the brass shoulder dimensions by about -.002".
after making this adjustment see if your brass will chamber and your bolt will close. If it will not close easily screw your die in a little further and repeat the insertion process until your brass cartridge case will fit into your chamber and your bolt will easily close.
Once your proper headspace has been established you can load up just one round with primer, powder, and bullet and see if it will fit entirely into your Sammi spec case gage as well as your rifle.
If you have a mind you can purchase the Redding(caliber specific) body die as well as the redding competition shell holder set and run all your brass through it. (this is what I use)
Additionally, I was wondering what brand of brass that you are using and perhaps you might consider changing it if you are still encountering this.

Final Thoughts:
I have found that even though brass will not entirely fit into a case gage it will fit into your rifles chamber.
If it will easily chamber and fit into the magazine of your rifle as well I would call it done and not make any further adjustments.
You may consider annealing your case's neck and shoulder before you perform your full length resize. ( your brass maybe still too hard)
To that end, you must through trial and error work these issues out.
Best of luck!
 
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