Well finally did it...sold all my reloading stuff !! Anyone else shooting factory ?

sw282

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Dec 29, 2015
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132
l enjoy loading my own. Shooting IHMSA silhouette , 44s can get pretty expensive @ 100rds a week
 

Coyote_Hunter

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Are you honestly not getting the point that many of us have posted time and time again? I'll try one last time:

If reloading is a separate independent hobby that you enjoy, go nuts.
I do, and I will continue to do so.

If you want to make up numbers to make yourself feel better or rationalize costs, go nuts

If you want to perform a true cost comparison you must include all tools, materials, and labor. That's how a cost comparison works. You don't get to say that brass is used more than once so it's free. It's not free, and you need to spread out the cost over the number of times that material is used. You don't get to ignore the price of your equipment - you amortize over number of rounds made with said equipment. You can get slightly more involved if you truly want a life cycle cost, but above is the absolute bare bones minimum - tools, material, and labor.
If I include tools and amortize by the year, it comes to around $33 per year. Amortizing by cartridge, it comes to about $0.05 or $1 per box.

A LOT of my brass came to me for $0.00. Free. I am not going to assign a $$ value to it when I calculate reload costs. The free brass includes .223. 5.56, .22-250, 6.5 Creedmoor, 7mm RM, .308, .30-06, .375 H&H, .380 ACP, 9mm Luger, .40 S&W and .45ACP. We’re talking a couple hundred cases minimum per cartridge, with some in the thousands. Then there is the once-fired brass I’ve purchased at substantial discounts over new prices, often about 50% less.

The free and once-fired brass covers the vast majority of my brass stock and reloading needs. While I used the cost of new brass in calculating my brass costs for reloading at maybe $1 a box, the actual cost is far less due to my use of the free and once-fired brass. Quite often the cost is indeed $0.00.

Whether you realize it or not, you have assigned a value to your time of $0.00/hour. Myself and others have stated that our time is more valuable than $0.00 at this point in our lives. Maybe in 30 years, I will say my time is free, but not now.

Nobody is saying that you are wrong for doing something you like. Some of us are just pointing out that your cost comparisons are riddled with holes.
The value you place on YOUR time has no effect on how I value MY time. Most of my life I’ve been salaried rather than hourly and have been paid the same regardless of the actual hours I put in. It wasn’t like I could put in more time at the job and earn more. I put in enough hours every week (typically well over 40 - and too frequently double that) that I darn sure wasn’t going to get a second job.

That said, there is an opportunity cost associated with everything I do, whether it is reloading, sleeping, rebuilding the deck on the back of our house or whatever. If you want to measure that cost by what I COULD be doing instead, go ahead. I’ll measure it by what I WOULD be doing. Most times other activities I would engage in bring in no new money or involve actually spending money. Home and auto repairs and reloading all have one feature in common – at the end of the day I save money, which has the same net effect on my bank balance as earning it.

If I was going to put a $$ value on my reloading time, it would be related to the money saved. Even on my single-stage Rock Chucker I can crank out 100-200 cartridges an hour, depending on the cartridge, and that includes case prep time. If I’m saving $10 a box and build 100 cartridges (5 boxes), that equates to $50/hour post-tax dollars or $74/hour in pre-tax dollars. If I’m saving $25 a box it equates to $125/hour in post-tax dollars or $185 an/hour pre-tax dollars.

The ”holes” you say are in my cost comparisons are the result of you applying your values and way of doing things to my way. If you want to quibble about $1.50 or less in my reload costs, that’s fine – but it doesn’t substantially impact my cost analysis. Federal Premium 6.5CM 130g Scirocco II loads still cost me $42 if I was to buy them and I can still build ammo with the same bullet for under $18 a box, a savings of $24 per box. The cheapest .45-70 ammo I can find is $25 a box. I can save $20 a box building it. And so on and on and on…

Most of my shooting is rifle cartridges and much of the ammo I shoot has no corresponding factory option. While I could have custom ammo built to my specs, the cost would be far higher than my reload costs. But why bother – what I do is build custom ammo, the quality of which is as good as anything you can get from factory or custom ammo makers and much better than most.

Does it always make sense to reload? Not for me. I quit reloading shot shell because I didn’t shoot enough to make it worthwhile. I don’t reload .25ACP for the same reason. I purchased factory .327 Fed Mag ammo for a while because I had no brass and dies were $100. Now I have the brass so I purchased the dies - and can now build target loads for $5.30 per 50 instead of paying $29.99 when I can find it. Factory defensive loads run $1.30 or more each but I can build them for $0.22, saving $1.08 each. I build them 50 at a time and savings from the first 2 boxes more than paid for the dies. Future reload sessions will save me about $24 per 50 for target loads and $54 per 50 for defensive loads. And I can comfortably build 150 per hour. That’s a pretty good return on investment whether you are retired or not.
 

Coyote_Hunter

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Just contacted a custom ammo maker. Sample packs of 40 rounds each cost about $350 each and it may take multiple packs to find a good load for a particular rifle. Or I could send them a rifle and they would do the load development for it. (For a substantial fee.)

Even if I sent them very specific build criteria, the cost of 100 rounds shipped to my house would be $1,200-$1,350 depending on the specific components used.

My rifle ammo is every bit as good as what I could purchase from a custom ammo maker and better than what I would probably get from most. The value for my reload time can be calculated as follows, based on my building 100 rounds:

$1300 Cost of custom ammo per 100
-$ 200 Component and amortized equipment cost per 100
======================================
$1100 per 100 finished cartridges


I once built .45-70 bullets using a Speer African Grand Slam Tungsten Solid. Those bullets cost over $5 each, or $500 per 100. (I only bought 5.) Other than that, the most expensive bullets I use have been about $1.00/100, The $200 per 100 allowed above is therefor VERY generous.

Since I can build 100 cartridges an hour in a walk, the value for my reload time, at least for my rifle cartridges, works out to a healthy $1100/hour in post-tax dollars.

In pre-tax dollars it works out to be a satisfying $1,630/hour.


Think I'll keep reloading.😁
 
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HuntnPack

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Feb 21, 2012
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The Wilderness
Ok here goes.

OP (statement):
Well finally did it...sold all my reloading stuff !!

OP (question):
Anyone else shooting factory ?
Answer: Yup.
Winner !!!

 
Last edited:

Kimber7man

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So I managed to snag some of the Berger factory 6.5 creedmoor ammo with the 156 EOL bullet. This is in Lapua LRP brass.
Tested it in my GAP 20” creed with 8 twist Bartlein #3 barrel, suppressed.
10 shots at 100 yards. started with cold bore.

It would be hard for me to produce loads on brand new brass that equal this
 

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Terry3006

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May 17, 2015
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Nice shooting ! Did you happen to chrono those ? I was getting around 2638 fps ,,,,was getting 2650 with handloads. 24” barrel
 

Kimber7man

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Nice shooting ! Did you happen to chrono those ? I was getting around 2638 fps ,,,,was getting 2650 with handloads. 24” barrel
nope, I only have 50 rounds down the barrel. Will chrono the loads after 150 or so...

I‘d be happy to get 2,600 after it speeds up!
 

ATH

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Lizton, IN
Whether you realize it or not, you have assigned a value to your time of $0.00/hour. Myself and others have stated that our time is more valuable than $0.00 at this point in our lives. Maybe in 30 years, I will say my time is free, but not now.

Nobody is saying that you are wrong for doing something you like. Some of us are just pointing out that your cost comparisons are riddled with holes.
Why would I assign labor costs to reloading, when my reloading time does not detract from paid work hours? Should I inform my kids I'll be docking them $75 in allowance for spending an hour with them? Does my wife need to pay me for my attention?
 

Tangent

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Jun 18, 2019
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Montana
Why would I assign labor costs to reloading, when my reloading time does not detract from paid work hours? Should I inform my kids I'll be docking them $75 in allowance for spending an hour with them? Does my wife need to pay me for my attention?
That is how a basic cost comparison works: Labor + equipment + material. This isn’t complex stuff.
 

Coyote_Hunter

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Jul 24, 2019
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6491 feet above sea level
That is how a basic cost comparison works: Labor + equipment + material. This isn’t complex stuff.
I'm now assigning $1,630/hour as the time value of my labor spent reloading, based on the cost of custom ammo, which is what I build.

Or $0.00 depending on how I feel.

You are right. It isn't complicated.
 

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