Varying POI- Posture Question

waveslayer

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Agreed, it must be my form. When one loads the bipod, is there any reason to go beyond enough pressure to keep the stock against the shoulder without any other additional support?
Yes, the bipod loading is recoil management and natural point of aim. The rear bag is elevation adjustment and you don't want hard on hard... meaning hard gun on a soft rear bag, helps with recoil and returning to NPOA. Does that make sense. If you shoot off a cement bench I always place a towel or something soft on the bench and then place the bipod on it .
 

skipglo

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I was at the range today with the 270w and the 300wm. At 100 yards both rifles were shooting 1moa, 2” high and dead center.
The trouble I ran in to with both rifles is that I began shooting low (6”) and right (3”) at only 200 yards.
Just to check myself I brought them both back in to 100 yards, and they were the same as before; dead center, 2” high.

I know it must be something in my posture, but do not know where to begin looking. I haven’t had this issue before.
Any helpful thoughts?
I don't imagine either gun has an adjustable cheek piece? It sounds to me like you may be looking UNDER your crosshairs and are raising the back of the stock to bring the crosshairs DOWN onto your target as you see it... therefore shooting low at distance.....
 

waveslayer

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I don't imagine either gun has an adjustable cheek piece? It sounds to me like you may be looking UNDER your crosshairs and are raising the back of the stock to bring the crosshairs DOWN onto your target as you see it... therefore shooting low at distance.....
That would also effect his 100 yard groupings and POI. Don't believe that is his problem. Recoil management , flinching, and body posture. He needs to create a Natural point of aim and not muscle it
 

mwkelso

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Yes, the bipod loading is recoil management and natural point of aim. The rear bag is elevation adjustment and you don't want hard on hard... meaning hard gun on a soft rear bag, helps with recoil and returning to NPOA. Does that make sense. If you shoot off a cement bench I always place a towel or something soft on the bench and then place the bipod on it .

Yes, this makes sense. Thank you for explaining that for me.
 

sturner

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You can’t control recoil got to let it happen and if you look up all you will see is a bad shot
Stay down and let the recoil happen
 

LR65Pb

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Mar 9, 2015
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Get a piece of scrap carpet, or a carpet sample, and put it on your shooting bench. Something wth a sticky backing is best. When you go to shoot, put a load on your rifle. That is, to lean forward enough to take the slop out of the bipod, but not enough to make the carpet skid on the benchtop. This may not solve your problem, but it will tighten your groups.
I stole my wife's rubber coated, soft-type, memory foam lake floatee . Head rest is perfect for leaning into a bit. Great for prone position. Atlas bipod.
 

mwkelso

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I made it out to the range today. This time I was prone on dirt, no bench.
Loading the bipod definitely tightened up the groups. It’s going to take some getting used to not pulling the rifle right in to the shoulder.
Even though the groups were tighter, I was still having the diving low and right issue. Would this possibly be my trigger pull?
Haven’t verified reticle plumb yet. That will have to be another day.
I know this won’t all be solved in one day at the range. Practice. Practice. Practice. Repeat.
 
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