Varying POI- Posture Question

mwkelso

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Aug 4, 2019
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313
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Hayden, ID
I was at the range today with the 270w and the 300wm. At 100 yards both rifles were shooting 1moa, 2” high and dead center.
The trouble I ran in to with both rifles is that I began shooting low (6”) and right (3”) at only 200 yards.
Just to check myself I brought them both back in to 100 yards, and they were the same as before; dead center, 2” high.

I know it must be something in my posture, but do not know where to begin looking. I haven’t had this issue before.
Any helpful thoughts?
 

Buster Hemlock

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Feb 26, 2019
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346
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NC
What type of bipod? Are the legs spring loaded and are you shooting it off the bench at 100 bottomed out. By spring loaded I mean are the legs the type that have a spring at the bottom? I've seen them hop when they are bottomed out which would throw off your 100 yard zero and thus anything beyond. A lot of times extending the bipod just a little so it's no longer under spring tension will alleviate this problem. Not saying this is it but definitely worth taking a look at.
 

mwkelso

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Aug 4, 2019
Messages
313
Location
Hayden, ID
What type of bipod? Are the legs spring loaded and are you shooting it off the bench at 100 bottomed out. By spring loaded I mean are the legs the type that have a spring at the bottom? I've seen them hop when they are bottomed out which would throw off your 100 yard zero and thus anything beyond. A lot of times extending the bipod just a little so it's no longer under spring tension will alleviate this problem. Not saying this is it but definitely worth taking a look at.

Champion 9-13”, spring loaded but bottoms out when retracted. The feet on the legs have a soft rubber knob on them.


Check scope level and reticle plumb.

Coincidently I did this recently. My method was to level the mounting plates in the vice, then verify that the scope is also level once attached to the mounting plates. Is there a different method that may be more fine tuned or accurate for scope level?
What’s your method to check reticle plumb?
 

Mram10us

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Oct 19, 2019
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Idaho
Draw a plumb line on your 100 yd target. Shoot one shot to make sure it is sighted in. Run the elevation up 20 clicks and see if it shoots high and on the line. Then run it down 40 clicks. You should know if it is plumb with the barrel.
That is a HUGE amount of can’t. Should be very noticeable. Look at your rifle from behind the stock where you can see the crosshairs and make sure they point down thru the stock
 

Buster Hemlock

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Feb 26, 2019
Messages
346
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Champion 9-13”, spring loaded but bottoms out when retracted. The feet on the legs have a soft rubber knob on them.




Coincidently I did this recently. My method was to level the mounting plates in the vice, then verify that the scope is also level once attached to the mounting plates. Is there a different method that may be more fine tuned or accurate for scope level?
What’s your method to check reticle plumb?
Champion bipods have the springs down by the feet and when the bipod is at its shortest length the legs are under spring tension that can induce hop on a solid surface. If you extend them one setting and relieve that spring tension. I've seen that eliminate similar issues for shooters in the past, not saying that is definitely it for you but I've seen it fix similar issues before. Let us all know what you end up figuring out when you do.
 

stirner

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Mar 10, 2012
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Helena, Mt
Get a piece of scrap carpet, or a carpet sample, and put it on your shooting bench. Something wth a sticky backing is best. When you go to shoot, put a load on your rifle. That is, to lean forward enough to take the slop out of the bipod, but not enough to make the carpet skid on the benchtop. This may not solve your problem, but it will tighten your groups.
 

mwkelso

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Aug 4, 2019
Messages
313
Location
Hayden, ID
Moat likely shooter error.
How's your parallax?
Are you shooting at your natural point of aim or are you muscling the gun ?

As far as I can tell the parallax is adjusted out using the parallax knob. The crosshairs stay on the same part of the target regardless of where I have my eye positioned behind the scope, and the image is very clear.

I do tend to shoulder the rifles firmly. I use my trigger hand to hold the rifle tight in the pocket of the shoulder, and the off hand rests under the butt of the stock in a fist to adjust aim.
 

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