Tripod Shot Positions and Western Hunting

Riverguy

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Mar 28, 2021
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66
Location
Wisconsin
I have a oil oryx tag this fall and from what I'm told due to brush standing shots are the norm, no trees or rocks for a rest.
I like to put the odds of success in my favor as much as possible.
So, i for one am very interested in learning everything i possibly can from this thread. Keep the great info coming
 

K9TXS

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Nov 4, 2014
Messages
120
Location
Clarksville, TN
After using a ball head and a leveling head on my tripod, I much prefer the leveling head. For me the leveling head is much easier to use. The movement of one butterfly lever will lock or unlock the head for adjustment.

I use the Leofoto LB60N. When I first started using it, it was not smooth. After putting a little oil in certain spots and continued use, it is now very smooth and locks into easily into position.

I used this extensively on my last prairie dog hunt in the standing position with specialty pistols. I made a simple rest that connects to the leveling head and made shots out to a little over 300 yards accurately.
 

codyadams

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Jan 7, 2015
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Location
Southwest Wyoming
I hunt for 30 years and I NEVER used a tripod. I barely use a bipod. Do people lose the touch with creativity? Or are these city slickers buying expensive toys? It must be the new hype these days. Last time I was elk hunting I met few city slickers like that. City boys dressed up in expensive camo, rifles and glass worth more than my new F150, provisions like if they were expecting WWIII. They had every toy, tripods and gizmos in their camp, I was surprised the jetboat guide could carry all this stuff upstream. They camped in the mountains in the river bed for 3 weeks and did not get a squat. And the point of the story?????
Oh, now I get it. You are using this forum to push your products without paying for advertising. Sorry for being a fool and not seeing through it right away
Well, you are right about one thing. You are being a fool.
 

nksmfamjp

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Jan 5, 2004
Messages
1,359
I hunt for 30 years and I NEVER used a tripod. I barely use a bipod. Do people lose the touch with creativity? Or are these city slickers buying expensive toys? It must be the new hype these days. Last time I was elk hunting I met few city slickers like that. City boys dressed up in expensive camo, rifles and glass worth more than my new F150, provisions like if they were expecting WWIII. They had every toy, tripods and gizmos in their camp, I was surprised the jetboat guide could carry all this stuff upstream. They camped in the mountains in the river bed for 3 weeks and did not get a squat. And the point of the story?????
You aren’t arguing the value of the tripod rest are you? Surely you have just over-drank or something. Putting your rifle in a fairly stable but not really stable creative rest should be driving you to see the value of a good tripod rest, but you seem to want to go all wonky and beat down a guy sharing his experience?

it’s ok…move on!
 

Wyfox

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Joined
Oct 11, 2010
Messages
71
Location
Wyoming
I use them a ton with my kids, builds a quick solid shooting platform for them. One of the best gear purchases i've ever made. I find myself shooting off a tripod majority of the time now and have put direct mount arca rails on most my guns.
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BrentM

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Jan 10, 2013
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3,094
Location
Meridian, Idaho
I’ve just started using a tripod, and bought a Feisol tripod and cb 40 head......it was used but is in perfect shape and I got it for a great price. I’m wondering if the size 40 head is big enough? If i was starting over I think I’d def go with the cb50 or larger.
Ive only had it out once for actual shooting and had no other shooting aids, benches, chairs or anything to rest my trigger side elbow against. It turned out OK, but not how I had envisioned. I concluded that I really need some support for the trigger side arm/elbow.
Since then several folks suggested a way to sit behind the rifle with one leg extended slightly bent, with the elbow resting on top. I’ve yet to try it while actually shooting, but practiced and it shows potential.
Lastly, after my first trip to the field, I got home and noticed the arca plate on the ball head was just a tad loose....barely noticeable, but loose. I don’t know if it was loose while I was shooting or not. That would have made a world of difference......so that’s something that needs to be checked every time it’s used.
The Feisol legs and head seem to be very high quality.....
Clearly the smaller you go the less sturdy to a degree. I think your issue was the rail being loose more than anything. Now, I will say it makes a huge difference having trigger hand support. This is something thought in long range hunting and prs comp. I generally have a back pack or trigger stick with me to support the rear. If seated use your pack and leg. I’ve got some photos I can share when I get back off the mountain Monday form elk scouting. I have cell in this one spot and read this thread and figured I’d just throw a quick response out.
 

BrentM

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Jan 10, 2013
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Meridian, Idaho
That went South quickly. What makes you think I don’t pay for advertising? It says it not once, but twice in my banner.

And yes, considering it’s my livelihood, I do push products on here.
Geesh. I’m at a loss right now. Ive seen 5 year old kids have more insight into life then this tool. Guess we found our village idiot.
 

WiscGunner

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Joined
Aug 2, 2016
Messages
212
I’ve just started using a tripod, and bought a Feisol tripod and cb 40 head......it was used but is in perfect shape and I got it for a great price. I’m wondering if the size 40 head is big enough? If i was starting over I think I’d def go with the cb50 or larger.
Ive only had it out once for actual shooting and had no other shooting aids, benches, chairs or anything to rest my trigger side elbow against. It turned out OK, but not how I had envisioned. I concluded that I really need some support for the trigger side arm/elbow.
Since then several folks suggested a way to sit behind the rifle with one leg extended slightly bent, with the elbow resting on top. I’ve yet to try it while actually shooting, but practiced and it shows potential.
Lastly, after my first trip to the field, I got home and noticed the arca plate on the ball head was just a tad loose....barely noticeable, but loose. I don’t know if it was loose while I was shooting or not. That would have made a world of difference......so that’s something that needs to be checked every time it’s used.
The Feisol legs and head seem to be very high quality.....
The amount of “success” shooting off a tripod can vary greatly.

“Size” of a tripod head has very little to do with function. There are giant ball heads with 8lb ratings and super small ball heads with 25lb ratings. Sturdy equipment needs both proper design and proper assembly. Loctite screws.

Be sure your “arca” rail fits your clamp, most cheap ones vary dramatically and can have tapers to them. RRS patterned rails are best as this is an actual measured spec not just a visual concept. The type if clamp you use important too. Adjustable clamps are able to accommodate variances in the rail especially between multiple rails.

Simply using a tripod is no different than resting your rifle on a tree branch. Properly using a tripod is much better than a tree branch. Body stance, tripod leg position, pressure into tripod, pressure into rifle, counter pressure with slings/cord, choice of tripod feet, where on the stock the tripod if attacked, etc all play a huge part in amount of difference a tripod can bring to your shooting.

Tripod shooting is definitely a learned technique
 

BrentM

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Jan 10, 2013
Messages
3,094
Location
Meridian, Idaho
I’ve just started using a tripod, and bought a Feisol tripod and cb 40 head......it was used but is in perfect shape and I got it for a great price. I’m wondering if the size 40 head is big enough? If i was starting over I think I’d def go with the cb50 or larger.
Ive only had it out once for actual shooting and had no other shooting aids, benches, chairs or anything to rest my trigger side elbow against. It turned out OK, but not how I had envisioned. I concluded that I really need some support for the trigger side arm/elbow.
Since then several folks suggested a way to sit behind the rifle with one leg extended slightly bent, with the elbow resting on top. I’ve yet to try it while actually shooting, but practiced and it shows potential.
Lastly, after my first trip to the field, I got home and noticed the arca plate on the ball head was just a tad loose....barely noticeable, but loose. I don’t know if it was loose while I was shooting or not. That would have made a world of difference......so that’s something that needs to be checked every time it’s used.
The Feisol legs and head seem to be very high quality.....
Getting back to this. Not all tripods are made the same even in the feisol family. There is a reason the 3342 is light compared to a 3372. Breaking down the tripod.... the head stock, the part the legs attach to determines a lot of the stability. The bigger, beefier, more robust that platform the better. I've used all sorts of tripods and got away from them as they just didn't provide the stability I wanted for the weight being packed until I found the 3342. If I shoot a PRS match I'll use a 3372 or RRS but for hunting, glassing, etc the 3342 is it. The head is the next item. A quality head will not have side to side slop like a lot of the cheaper ball heads. If your head has movement then it needs to tightened up or replaced. The smaller heads are lighter and less material so overall strength is the biggest issue vs stability. I've seen the 30-40 be fine for lighter recoil, just as stabile, as long as they are not loose. My last 40mm was sloppy, manfrotto, so I assumed the 50 feisol would last longer. So far, 2.5 years and it's going strong. Last the legs and joints are all about the same in the same class. 3372 has beefy carbon legs and is rated at 100 plus pounds. The 3342 is around 40 and half the size. Were the flex becomes noticeable is standing. I had students hitting 500 standing without issue but going 800-1000 mine needs a rear support. The 3372 is capable of those without the rear support in my opinion, since I've done it.

Support is the biggest factor. Mount the rifle in a neutral position, rail in the balance point, and use something for rear support and you'll be gold. The main thing is that you have to practice and play. I've used the side of a tree, stick, back pack, hiking pole, a buddy, etc. I've set the rifle on a log and used my tripod for the rear support just like we do in PRS. Shooting coyotes 500-1100 yards is difficult, having a wiggly platform and making hit is just luck.
 

livetohunt

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I’ll post what I know, @BrentM Will critique it, and we will all be the wiser! Seriously though, you much more knowledgeable than I am, thanks a ton for the input on this thread!

Ken
 

BrentM

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Jan 10, 2013
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Meridian, Idaho
I’ll post what I know, @BrentM Will critique it, and we will all be the wiser! Seriously though, you much more knowledgeable than I am, thanks a ton for the input on this thread!

Ken
Ha ha not here to critique, willing to help and learn as well. Except I'll criticize people who bag on others for using tools to help with accuracy while hunting. heh heh
 
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