To close: what am I doing wrong

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Metzger, Jan 16, 2014.

  1. Metzger

    Metzger Well-Known Member

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    I am working up my first latter reloads. Some of my rounds are touching the lans with a oal of 2.795 for my .308. I am using federal match brass and seirra 190 mkt since I cannot find 155s, 175s or 178s.
    Any advise?
     

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  2. westcliffe01

    westcliffe01 Well-Known Member

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    I just did my first batch or match reloads for my 8x57. I was loading Hornady 196gr HPBT bullets since the choice in 8mm is a bit restricting. I found that the guide length (cylindrical portion) of the 196gr HPBT was quite long and it quite drastically restricted the OAL that I was able to use in my reloads.

    If I continue to shoot these bullets long term, I would have to get a throating reamer and lengthen the throat to allow the bullets to be seated out far enough (as the magazine will allow) so that I can actually utilize the available case capacity and get the best velocity.

    Given the relatively poor choices in bullets in 8mm, its fairly likely that will be the plan. In 308 there are a lot more bullet choices.

    Now regarding bullet availability: I sent you a PM....
     
  3. mtwarych

    mtwarych Well-Known Member

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    What I am seeing in your picture is a loadramp scuff or an ejecter scuff. It does not look like a lands and grooves mark. Use a black magic marker and color the bullet completely around the shank and then chamber the round and extract the bullet carefully. Look for marks in a pattern around the bullet that would be left there by the bullet coming into contact with the lands and grooves. They will be marks that run across the bullet shank, not with the length of the bullet. I hope someone else can explain it better for you.
     
  4. westcliffe01

    westcliffe01 Well-Known Member

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    In my case the Hornady HPBT was a tight fit in the throat and I got a mark that went all the way around the circumference just like illustrated. It never got near to the lands before it hung up. And to extract it I had to use a rubber mallet on the bolt handle...
     
  5. Erik Kiser

    Erik Kiser Well-Known Member

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    If you're certain that's not scuff's from feeding I'd take a good look at the barrel. My bullets developed scuffs very similar to that and found out it was a carbon ring. Coincided with an odd jump in pressures
     
  6. westcliffe01

    westcliffe01 Well-Known Member

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    Mine is a brand new lapped Shilen match barrel.
     
  7. RT2506

    RT2506 Well-Known Member

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    Since I don't know your experience in hand loading here are some basic thoughts. It all depends on what type of throat you have in your rifle. If it is a standard chamber for a 308 Win you are not going to be able to have too much bullet sticking out of the case with a 190 SMK. Those things a looooooog. I only see scratches on one place on the bullet in that picture which sure looks like scuffs from the loading ramp.
    Have you tried FL sizing a case and cutting a line from the mouth down to the start of the shoulder. Clean up the burrs and size it again. Just start your bullet in the case by hand and carefully place it in the chamber and close the bolt. The bullet will be pushed back into the case when the ogive hits the lands. Carefully remove the cartridge and measure your OAL from the ogive to the base of the case. This is your to the lands OAL. Now you know where you are so you can seat the bullet deeper and know how far off the lands you are.

    If you are measuring your OAL from the tip of the bullet to the base of the case you will have no idea really what your OAL is. Bullets are not all the same length from the base of the bullet to the tip. They will measure the same from the base of the bullet to the ogive. You need a bullet comparator on your dial calipers to measure from the ogive to base of case.
     
  8. westcliffe01

    westcliffe01 Well-Known Member

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    Hope it doesn't offend the OP, but I saved his picture, which was pretty blown out by the flash and edited it a little in Gimp. Here it is again after shifting the exposure somewhat. I highlighted the area of interest.
    [​IMG]

    The previous poster was being too distracted by the obvious scuff mark on the right hand side.