Thors Hammer Thundered!

Muddyboots

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Feb 7, 2013
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3,854
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I'm loving it! All your load development work and sharing data. Great reward and great buck!
G: I learned a ton from everyone here on LRH especially on Hammers so its real easy to pay it back to hopefully save some components these days.

This 156HH RL26 load is a HAMMER downrange. This bullet changes everything about the .270 if built with enough COAL, CBTO, freebore and twist to spin it right! I am really thinking of another build but with longer carbon barrel and lighter stock. Maybe 1:7.5 TW would be nice too.

Next year I plan on testing it on elk if I am fortunate to draw 1st season CO.
 

Muddyboots

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If you picked up on how long I looked for hair and or blood, it was well over 30 minutes. You just don't have a reference point in a cut corn field. I was off by at least 30-40 yards of where I thought he was because there was big track there and I thought it was his. I also marked a tree where he entered hedgerow but when I got to where I thought he was standing my perspective got whacked because similar tree was 40 yards south of the actual tree which was 200 yards so perspectives can get changed easily in wide open fields. I searched the so called entry point of the hedgerow as well to no avail. It was only after I got back into field walked back to where I was looking that I kicked myself in butt for failing miserably at nailing down where he was when I shot. It was so simple when I pulled out my rangefinder (DUH!) and hit my sit and went Oh 💩 dumas! I kept hitting sit until I got the range I needed, looked down to see big running track, took a step on it and bingo....blood spot then Stevie Wonder blood trail.

So why am I telling y'all this? The buck never bronco kicked, never showed any indication of a hit, took off full throttle. I did notice he slowed to walk at the hedgerow which also factored into my recovery.

I felt absolutely locked in on the shot. I believed I made a good shot so I could not believe I missed. I kept looking based upon my strong belief of my shot and then it came together.

I thought it is important to tell the whole story of recovery, it was not a slam dunk and maybe some would have written it off as clean miss due to no deer reaction on impact. I messed up on where I thought he was in corn field since cut corn does not have any reference point but the simple task of using rangefinder to pin down his location at beginning of recovery would have shortened recovery big time.

We shoot a lot, we have confidence not only in our rifles but ourselves so if you feel the shot was spot on, stay on the recovery until you have exhausted all avenues no natter how long it takes. I knew better and use my rangefinder to pin down locations on so many different things that I could not believe I failed to use it on such a simple process as this.

My son was on other side of farm, even he said if I felt good on shot I killed him. Sometimes we just have brain cramps that interfere with what we know how to do well.

I would have stayed the whole day screwing up Thanksgiving dinner to look for him based on how strongly I felt that I killed him. Good thing I straightened out my recovery otherwise I might be in @skipglo's basement.
 

338 dude

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Mar 1, 2016
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3,628
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Tn
G: I learned a ton from everyone here on LRH especially on Hammers so its real easy to pay it back to hopefully save some components these days.

This 156HH RL26 load is a HAMMER downrange. This bullet changes everything about the .270 if built with enough COAL, CBTO, freebore and twist to spin it right! I am really thinking of another build but with longer carbon barrel and lighter stock. Maybe 1:7.5 TW would be nice too.

Next year I plan on testing it on elk if I am fortunate to draw 1st season CO.
You know muddy I’m almost over the whole 270 twister Thors hammer thing,ALMOST! LOL With an even faster twist maybe your next one can be the 270 twister
 

skipglo

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Jan 23, 2015
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2,801
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Alberta
If you picked up on how long I looked for hair and or blood, it was well over 30 minutes. You just don't have a reference point in a cut corn field. I was off by at least 30-40 yards of where I thought he was because there was big track there and I thought it was his. I also marked a tree where he entered hedgerow but when I got to where I thought he was standing my perspective got whacked because similar tree was 40 yards south of the actual tree which was 200 yards so perspectives can get changed easily in wide open fields. I searched the so called entry point of the hedgerow as well to no avail. It was only after I got back into field walked back to where I was looking that I kicked myself in butt for failing miserably at nailing down where he was when I shot. It was so simple when I pulled out my rangefinder (DUH!) and hit my sit and went Oh 💩 dumas! I kept hitting sit until I got the range I needed, looked down to see big running track, took a step on it and bingo....blood spot then Stevie Wonder blood trail.

So why am I telling y'all this? The buck never bronco kicked, never showed any indication of a hit, took off full throttle. I did notice he slowed to walk at the hedgerow which also factored into my recovery.

I felt absolutely locked in on the shot. I believed I made a good shot so I could not believe I missed. I kept looking based upon my strong belief of my shot and then it came together.

I thought it is important to tell the whole story of recovery, it was not a slam dunk and maybe some would have written it off as clean miss due to no deer reaction on impact. I messed up on where I thought he was in corn field since cut corn does not have any reference point but the simple task of using rangefinder to pin down his location at beginning of recovery would have shortened recovery big time.

We shoot a lot, we have confidence not only in our rifles but ourselves so if you feel the shot was spot on, stay on the recovery until you have exhausted all avenues no natter how long it takes. I knew better and use my rangefinder to pin down locations on so many different things that I could not believe I failed to use it on such a simple process as this.

My son was on other side of farm, even he said if I felt good on shot I killed him. Sometimes we just have brain cramps that interfere with what we know how to do well.

I would have stayed the whole day screwing up Thanksgiving dinner to look for him based on how strongly I felt that I killed him. Good thing I straightened out my recovery otherwise I might be in @skipglo's basement.
Basement is unfinished...but my 40' diesel pusher opens up to darn near 640 sq/ft......it's yours Brother...anytime you need it!
 
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