Thinking of trying a new die set

CBH Australia

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Not really. You can roll it on a piece of bar stock or a machinist's stone.

Depends on how exact you need to be exact.
I have enjoyed pretty good success detecting run out by using a dead flat pain of 24"x24" glass and roll each individually loaded round on it dead even at eye level under a very strong light. You'd be amazed how well out of round loadings show up.
I'd LOVE to buy a 21st Century CG but I can't justify the cost.
Myself I don't test measure concentricity but was pointing, just suggesting if you want to go that for testing it or more correctly measuring it.

I could test it on a flat surface but that does not correct it or straighten it or give a measurable results for my records or corrections.

My point was more it's another step in the pursuit of accuracy and I've read some measuring tools have incoporate a way of straightening the ammo.

I wonder how important it is in the end of the rifle chamber is cut square and concentric to the bore. Ultimately this is the last place the loaded bullet is handled and the firing must set in sequence a whole new chain of events that put more pressure on the components than any part of the reloading proccess.

You could check concerntricy on the loading bench and mess it up in storage or transport.

Would loading a bolt action with a tight chamber tilt, or adjust the concentrity? Setting it exactly where the rifle forces it at the point before firing

I have a mate who found his factory chambered rifle was not cut square or true to the bore. He had a good gunsmith set it back and recut it.
 

DartonJager

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Myself I don't test measure concentricity but was pointing, just suggesting if you want to go that for testing it or more correctly measuring it.

I could test it on a flat surface but that does not correct it or straighten it or give a measurable results for my records or corrections.

My point was more it's another step in the pursuit of accuracy and I've read some measuring tools have incoporate a way of straightening the ammo.

I wonder how important it is in the end of the rifle chamber is cut square and concentric to the bore. Ultimately this is the last place the loaded bullet is handled and the firing must set in sequence a whole new chain of events that put more pressure on the components than any part of the reloading proccess.

You could check concerntricy on the loading bench and mess it up in storage or transport.

Would loading a bolt action with a tight chamber tilt, or adjust the concentrity? Setting it exactly where the rifle forces it at the point before firing

I have a mate who found his factory chambered rifle was not cut square or true to the bore. He had a good gunsmith set it back and recut it.
FWIW
My results proved TO ME that my reloads that had barely visible to no visibly perceivable run out shot from minimally better to significantly better at all ranges I tested them VS ones that had significant visibly detectable run out.
This has been the norm for all my reloads for all my rifles.
I will say If I didn't have to equip my sons with all the needed items for hunting and shooting I would likely buy a 21st Century CG but the method I'm currently using works well enough for my current needs. One day when I can FINALLY begin long range competitive shooting I might be able to then justify they cost.

Just my experience as others may differ completely.
 

Reelamin

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Quick and to the point. I have over 30 sets of dies, just standard full length, neck, and seating dies. I have two sets of Redding bushing dies with the micrometer seating die. The rest are mostly RCBS and I have a few RCBS X Full Length dies. The others are Redding, Dillon, and Hornady standard sets. I have not seen one lick bit of difference in shooting results because of what die type or brand I used. I just loaded for a totally stock Savage 300WM this spring, and it is at this point the most accurate rifle I have ever loaded for in over 40 years including customs. It shoots one hole as in it will be larger in diameter not wavey around the edges and when loose its in the .1's. Yep, the dies are standard RCBS from the early 90's. Now that being said I have spent a lot of money keeping the industry going so it was not totally wasted I just did not see a benefit. I will again I'm sure.
 

CBH Australia

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FWIW
My results proved TO ME that my reloads that had barely visible to no visibly perceivable run out shot from minimally better to significantly better at all ranges I tested them VS ones that had significant visibly detectable run out.
This has been the norm for all my reloads for all my rifles.
I will say If I didn't have to equip my sons with all the needed items for hunting and shooting I would likely buy a 21st Century CG but the method I'm currently using works well enough for my current needs. One day when I can FINALLY begin long range competitive shooting I might be able to then justify they cost.

Just my experience as others may differ completely.
If it works it works. Haven't tried it , just wondered if chambering a round might affect the concentricity.

Some people are fans of the Lee dies with the Collet and mandrel for concentricity.

Others say the Forster Coaxial press reduces run out.

I'm not sure, just learning all the time.

I take care in all my handloads not a competitive shooter . I've been shooting for years but on the bench I know I could learn a lot and improve my shooting technique. I think it would show results in testing and group size . As would having someone who shoots better than me test the accuracy of the same load and rifle.
 

HeadedWest

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What would be a good first die for the long run.

Headed West I use Redding die's,I own RCBS and Hornady dies as well.
I will try Forster dies soon just to see if my groups tighten up but I expect they won't.
Thanks for the heads up. All the talk on this forum about reloading I figure I might to want to start getting with the program before to long. I get back to work ,I'll might start making some purchases Means your already invested, let my know how them Forster dies compare. Thanks by the way ,if I by a kit is the basically all I need besides the powder ,shells and bullets?.
 
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CBH Australia

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What would be a good first die for the long run.
Yes, I know you were serious.. I like different features of different brands.
Many are happy with Lee dies and get suitable results.
Pending budget here is my ranking
Lee dies
Hornady Dies
Redding
Forster, Wilson
Whidden

Can you define the long run. It's hard your preference might change, you might start competition or you might splurge on upgrades.

For the long run they will all last so long as you can replace a broken pin or stem.

Thanks for the heads up. All the talk on this forum about reloading I figure I might to want to start getting with the program before to long. I get back to work ,I'll might start making some purchases Means your already invested, let my know how them Forster dies compare. Thanks by the way ,if I by a kit is the basically all I need besides the powder ,shells and bullets?.
A kit should contain a good press, scales, maybe a powder thrower (aka measure), some basic case prep tools, basic lube pad, reloading manual (that has setup, adjustment and reloading instructions along with load data)

Consider Redding pending budget. You might outgrow Lee in the long run. It's a small press some of the others are larger and of more sturdy construction
 

StanleyActual

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I’ve always liked the Redding “S” Types and use them for all my sizing. For seating I go back and forth between LE Wilson Hand Seaters with K&M Arbor Press and RCBS Gold Metal Match Seaters. All with micrometer tops.

There maybe better dies but I’ve yet to fee a need to try them. What I have works for me.
 
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Old rooster

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Thanks for the heads up. All the talk on this forum about reloading I figure I might to want to start getting with the program before to long. I get back to work ,I'll might start making some purchases Means your already invested, let my know how them Forster dies compare. Thanks by the way ,if I by a kit is the basically all I need besides the powder ,shells and bullets?.
I would have to look at the kit description but it should have what you need to get started.
I will let you know about the Forster dies when I get them
 
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