Thinking about getting my first (inexpensive) crossbow for urban backyard target practice.

Buck Fever

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I was looking at Midway USA and saw the Centerpoint Volt 300 for $140.

It's a compound bow, entry level with 130 lb draw and shoots 20" bolts at 300 fps.

I have never bow hunted but if this Corona Virus turns in to a teotwawki situation, I know where there are deer and Turkey that could be discreetly harvested.

Until then, it will just be for target practice in my back yard which is why I'm looking at entry level crossbows. I don't want to spend $300+ on a legit hunting crossbow.

I know I will need a good archery target and extra bolts, probably higher quality than the Centerpoint bolts.

Is there anything else I need?

How often should I change bow strings?

What is the best inexpensive target for a low power compound crossbow?

Any other advice for using a crossbow on a budget would be appreciated.

The Volt 300 comes with what I assume is a low end red dot scope. What would be a budget upgrade that gives me a BDC reticle or elevation turret?

Lastly, what kind of arrowhead should I use for deer and turkey? I should probably get a few to put away.
 

Buck Fever

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Mar 10, 2020
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The bad bush
Well, I waited too long and that Midway deal went away.

I started looking at other stuff and I found a package deal with a SAS Authority crossbow for $220 that has a 175lb pull, 340 fps, 3 cheapo bolts, 6 carbon fiber bolts, broadhead points, a quiver, a soft case and a rope cocker for $220.

I was going to accessorize that Volt so it's not much more money but it is a more powerful crossbow. If I ever have to harvest a deer, hopefully it will go down easier.

I still need a target. Any advice or experience with that would be appreciated.

I was reading about the dangers of dry fire. Is it possible to manually de-cock a compound crossbow? I can lift 175 lbs pretty easy so strength is probably not an issue but if it is a pain in the ***, I would rather know before I try. I'm going to make sure I end target practice sessions without cocking after my last shot but if I'm in the field, ready to shoot and then the shot goes away, I want to know what I can and should do.

Along those lines, is there anything I need to do for storage, it might be months between uses for me. Are there any spares I should keep on hand?

Thanks.
 

Rick Richard

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Jan 7, 2014
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Can't help with inexpensive crossbows since mine is much more on the top end side, but I can pass on in what you asked.

For the best bolts out there and not too expensive call Jerry at Tapp-Nation. Good quality bolts are paramount to accurracy.

Any rated bag target is good for crossbows using field points. If you want to shoot broadhead, then purchase a "Blob" target...best for broadhead shooting.

Also, wax the serving and string, but not serving frequently. Wax on the serving can gum up the trigger mechanism and lead to failures. Apply a rail lube every 15 or so shots. This keeps the friction down which minimizes wear on the serving.

Lastly, unless it's a built in feature on the crossbow you will not be able to decock the crossbow. You can either shoot the bolt in the ground or use a portable target.

Good luck and safe shooting.
 

Buck Fever

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Mar 10, 2020
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Location
The bad bush
Thank you.

I think this will be fun learning how to deal with the trajectory of a fairly slow bolt and quiet enough that it will not disturb my neighbors.
 

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