Thermal scopes

NeedForSpeed

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Joined
Dec 22, 2018
Messages
183
Location
Palm Beach Fl
I had the Pulsar Thermion about $4000,didn't care for the images, bought it from Sightmark in Texas, on LE discount, two week trial period. Returned it and got the Pulsar Digex about $1700 and change, clearer images, better animal Id,I shoot over bait, and call a fair amount, my kill on yotes averages 40 to 60 yearly, my pictures posted here will verify. My shots would be stretching it at 300 yards for sure especially at night when coyotes rarely get shot over 100 yards in my state. At 300 yards I can identify a rabbit, and my unit has the invisible IR,all in all it's a winner for me.Farthest coyote shot at night for me was about 115 yards, while thermal has some advantages, like detecting heat signature behind brush and trees I don't find it beneficial to my application. I scan with a coyote light, and take the shot with the NV, when eyes are detected, over bait it's point and shoot.Digital night vision is what I have all images black and white ,and can be used in daylight in a pinch.
Im in Florida where there is a lot more cover for hogs as opposed to Texas. We drive around at night thru the swamp and hammocks and look for them, then stalk. Its a lot easier to spot the heat signatures than see them with IR. Its also more expensive to shoot good thermal scopes, so Im still evaluating my options.
 

Savage16Hunter

Active Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2013
Messages
26
Location
Charlotte, NC
im looking at getting into this and ive been looking at Thermal scopes between 4500 and 6000 dollars so im curious why you prefer the cheaper IR night vision How is that better? What is your application?
If you are hunting in wide open fields (so no reflectivity from an IR light off plants or other objects), with a good IR light, the clarity of an IR NV scope is much better resolution than even the most expensive thermal scope. However, in brush or tall grass where there will be reflectivity "glare" using IR, thermal is much better in finding and targeting game.
 

Ohlongarm

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Joined
Dec 1, 2019
Messages
392
Location
ohio
If you are hunting in wide open fields (so no reflectivity from an IR light off plants or other objects), with a good IR light, the clarity of an IR NV scope is much better resolution than even the most expensive thermal scope. However, in brush or tall grass where there will be reflectivity "glare" using IR, thermal is much better in finding and targeting game.
Correct, however I've taken game with about every scenario encountered in Ohio,fields,woods,treelines,river bottoms,bean field,cornfields,etc,with thermal it's the resolutions that i personally didn't care for. With night vision you can see your intended target blink his eyes. I like that. And a coyote is definitely a coyote not someone's stray dog. Comes down to what works for the individual.
 

basinman

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Joined
Jan 9, 2014
Messages
222
Location
Butte La Rose, LA
I use a $500 Sightmark Wraith in south Texas on pigs, coyotes and bobcat and it works very well. I have NV binos I use for scanning and spotting.
 

Revolting Peasant

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Joined
May 10, 2017
Messages
161
Location
Matagorda, Texas
My stuff,
Thermal monocular for scanning.
Pulsar Digex digital night vision riflescope
Halo LR thermal riflescope.

The Digex will give me a little better clarity. Dog vs coyote. Axis/exotic vs whitetail. But only if there is no interfering grass or brush to bloom out your ir light. And only at fairly close ranges, 200 yards and in. I just got it and am still getting used to it. Received it on a warranty trade in of an older model with problems. Pulsar has been very good to me over the years.

Halo LR is all around best for my purposes. I spent 2-3 years evaluating friends thermals and mulling before biting the bullet. I went Halo LR over Trijicon because I used both. I prefer the controls and menu of the Halo. Personal preference. Thermal picture quality was about the same for my eyes and usage.

Try as many as you can before laying out the money. Tell your dealer how you plan to use it. Range, vegetation, weather, caliber, weapon types, blind vs stalk. etc. Are you adamant about Bluetooth or wif? On board recording?

Just me but I would advise you to find a dealer you can trust and a company warranty you can rely on. They are sensitive, complicated electronics you are gonna abuse. Failure is an option. Plan for it.
 

haftime

Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2018
Messages
19
Location
Mansfield,PA
If you are hunting in wide open fields (so no reflectivity from an IR light off plants or other objects), with a good IR light, the clarity of an IR NV scope is much better resolution than even the most expensive thermal scope. However, in brush or tall grass where there will be reflectivity "glare" using IR, thermal is much better in finding and targeting game.
That info really helps. Thanks
 

NeedForSpeed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2018
Messages
183
Location
Palm Beach Fl
If you are hunting in wide open fields (so no reflectivity from an IR light off plants or other objects), with a good IR light, the clarity of an IR NV scope is much better resolution than even the most expensive thermal scope. However, in brush or tall grass where there will be reflectivity "glare" using IR, thermal is much better in finding and targeting game.
I hunted hogs one night with an IR spotter and it reflected off bugs plants everything It was like a snow storm
But in an open field i could see IR working well
 

JustMe2

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Joined
Feb 18, 2012
Messages
178
I spent part of my military career testing night vision systems installed on aircraft and on personnel. The terminology used above is wrong and confusing. Night Vision (NV) is a term used to describe any equipment that helps humans see in darkness. There are 2 common radiometric bands used for NV systems, near IR and far IR. Human eyes detect light in the .5 to .8 micron range. Near IR is approximately .8 to 1.5 microns and far IR is about 2.5 to 5 micons, therefore the description of "near" our vision and "far" farther from our vision spectra. Consequently, the accepted terminology for near IR is "light intensification" and for far IR is "thermal". Light intensification systems magnify the intensity of the moon, stars, and other ambient light sources including IR flashlights. Far IR is thermal because it magnifies "heat" sources and not light.

Now what are their advantages and disadvantages? Think of light intensification systems as receiving reflected light as your eyes do. Consequently, targets in the shadows will be hard or impossible to see because trees, etc block the moon and starlight. Also, use of an IR flashlight will sometimes be too bright like looking into the sun with your eyes . This happens when the IR flashlight is reflected off closer objects than your target so again you can't see the target.

Thermal is NOT reflected energy. It is a passive system that magnifies the heat emitted from objects like your target, trees, grass, etc. Consequently, you can see targets standing in the shadows, on moonless and starless nights. The downside is thermal is not as clear as light intensification systems until you get into the $10k systems. However, thermal makes it easier to spot game at longer distances as a hot spot, but maybe not positively identify what that hot spot is. Is it a dog, coyote, deer, calf, etc???

So if you're hunting over an open field, light intensification can be used. If you're hunting in heavy foilage with many trees and bushes, thermal will be a better choice.
 
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Doug Herold

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Joined
Sep 14, 2017
Messages
172
I have not “advertised “, but will sell the attached Infared (IR) rig for $776. It is only a month or so old, but I bought a Thermal due to the fact that I live in the mountains of Virginia where I often only have @15 seconds to make the kill happen and I have to acquire the target fast.
Have xtra batteries, aftermarket Sniper Hog Light (IR) for extended visibility. Everything works perfectly, warranty. Selling well below my cost. GREAT for you “flatlanders” and those hunting over bait.
 

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Zhelton

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Joined
Oct 17, 2017
Messages
80
Just got a new super hogster by berring optics. 2995.00. 2.9 base mag with pip and digital zoom. Vox core and 12 micron. Also has ability to record and has an app for androids to stream to your phone. Good videos out on youtube. Havent mounted it yet as i just got it wednesday. Definately a step up from my flir pts233 i had. Also use 2 wraith nv, 4-32 and a new 2 -16.. hopefully i will get it all mounted and have some footage soon. Good luck with whatever you choose, its a blast using technology at night
 

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