The reason we anneal brass cases.

J E Custom

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Having a good understanding of what annealing does Metallurgically is important and the frequency of annealing is very important so this is a good explanation of what and why. It is a little long, but for a good understanding of the process I think it is worth watching.

If you are a reloader, it has good points to know.


J E CUSTOM
 
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sierracharlie338

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I learned that lesson. Was fireforming brass and did so without annealing. Lost two pieces of brass for a wildcat that brass is nonexistent for. Annealed every time since there and have had no issues.
 

Josebigsky

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Thanks JE. Good video. I have reloaded for 25 years and never annealed brass. I don’t compete so hunting only. But now I understand why it’s important. Now the question is spending $$$ on an annealer better than just buying brass after 3-4 shots in a hunting situation with longest distance 600 yards?
 

venatic

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IMO that’s easy question. For your purposes annealing is not worth it.
 

WYOHTF

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Thanks JE. Good video. I have reloaded for 25 years and never annealed brass. I don’t compete so hunting only. But now I understand why it’s important. Now the question is spending $$$ on an annealer better than just buying brass after 3-4 shots in a hunting situation with longest distance 600 yards?
Check this out, I am placing an order next pay half

 

J E Custom

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Didn't watch video, but why buy an annealer when doing it yourself with a propane torch is easy?

That's the way most of us started and it worked to save the brass. but when long range shots are made, consistency becomes more important, so we had to come up with a more consistent method. You don't have to spend hundreds of dollars to build an annealed and if you don't mind replacing the cases after 3 or 4 uses that's fine also. Annealing Is not for everyone.

J E CUSTOM
 

P7M13

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we had to come up with a more consistent method.
Consistency in technique works too.
Not disagreeing with you here -- it sure is a lot easier to put brass into the annealer than to load a case onto the mandrel and drop it off when it hits the temperature.
What the video didn't discuss is the time & temperature reset rate (i.e. crystal reforming) for the stress and strain in the brass. I imagine if I took the time to search, one could be found.
If it's a narrow window, which I don't suspect is the case with brass, then a machine would be in order.
 

MajorSpittle

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My '06 federal brass is at 6-8 reloads without annealing. It gets trimmed every firing.

I will probably toss it at load 10 if it doesn't have issues before then.

Is this pretty typical, and how many more loads do you think I could get from annealing every 3rd load?
 

Varmint Hunter

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I reload most of my brass 6-8 times, occasionally more. I have never annealed a case. The only obvious downside that I've noticed was inconsistent seating pressure. Most of my brass will still shoot .5moa after several reloads.
If annealing was easier and less expensive I'd give it a shot but for now it just doesn't seem necessary for the shooting/hunting that I do.
 

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