The LRF Wars. Is it really that bad?

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by Midgetsniper, Oct 17, 2018.

  1. Midgetsniper

    Midgetsniper Well-Known Member

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    After pouring over pages until my head has started to hurt and eyes have started to bleed I must say, I’m at a total loss. My girlfriend offered to buy me a rangefinder for my birthday and I happily skipped to here,SH, LRonly etc. to do some research. Immediately I noticed a gap and a huge one at that. Seemed like the only real solid choices were expensive rangefinders. Being that I am a realistic person and not an ******* the obvious choices are out Terrapin, Leica 2700 etc(I’m not making her fork out 800+ for a LRF).. a friend offered me a great deal(Sub $300) on a Sig 2200 BDX and Leupold RX-2800. But after a ton of research the Leu has almost no reviews and the sig 2200 is a bloody pissed off war zone of FU Sig vs I love Sig. The only others I feel confident about considering is the older Leica 1600R or 2000B from Euro optic. The Leica 2400 is a possibility but I’m kinda hoping to get a LRF with ballistics... So is the Sig 2200 really that bad quality and CS wise? If I go Leica which one? I’ve heard some negative stuff about the 2000 which makes me consider the 1600 more. Any input over this fiasco would be great. Need the capability to range steel to 1500yd and elk/deer to 1k . I’ll be posting this a few other places to diversify my input data. Thanks Again!
     
  2. Target Tamers

    Target Tamers Official LRH Sponsor

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    I like Sig. They're pretty darn on accurate imo, but I think their reticle turns out to be a little bigger than Leica's one when you're ranging out long distances making it a little harder for positive target acquisition.

    Almost got the Leupold RX2800 tbr, but that will have to wait until next year. Reviews are slim on it right now because it's new to 2018. It looks awesome. 6-2800 yards with deer up to 1700 yards. Really curious to see though if it can actually perform to these claims. If it can, it's one heck of a deal I'm willing to pull the trigger on.

    The Leica 1600-R goes out to 1600 yards, but I'm not sure what its deer yardage is. Right now, the 1600 and the 2000 are pretty much the same price. I'd go with the 2000 personally.

    I believe all 4 of these options don't allow for inputting custom ballistic info, but you can choose ballistics from a preloaded chart to match your loads. They all have angle compensation readouts.

    If I had to choose brand new - it's Leica all the way approx just less than $500 for either models. If I'm on a strict budget, I'd take the lightly used, new to 2018 Leupold from your friend for approx $300.
     
  3. gpo1956

    gpo1956 Well-Known Member

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    Tag
     
  4. Midgetsniper

    Midgetsniper Well-Known Member

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    Target tamer thanks for your insight. All rangefinders are brand new in the box non opened.It’s just a question of Leu/Sig for just under $300 or a Leica from Euro Optic for $400. All old model Leica on there site, both 1600’s and 2000B are all the same price on sale.
     
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  5. Target Tamers

    Target Tamers Official LRH Sponsor

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    So, even the Leupold and Sig are brand new, and you can get them for around sub$300! That's a pretty awesome deal.

    To narrow things down even further:

    Sig:
    • heard they have a good warranty, I think it's lifetime on the electronics which is important for a lrf, or at least a minimum of 5 years - the Leupold only has a 2-year warranty on it.
    • It's supposed to do excellent in less than ideal weather - snow and rain.
    • Super-fast readings
    • However, I've heard they have issues with quality control. Can't speak to experience on this, but there's certainly more complaints about Sig vs Leica.
    • Extreme ranging capabilities
    Leica:
    • Fantastic optical quality
    • Also features air pressure and temperature sensors
    • Can be used conveniently by left-hand users
    • Typically outperforms yardage ranges claimed for that model
    • Have repeatedly seen that Leica has a very small beam divergence of 0.5 mil that reduces errors when ranging further out. However, I've been unable to verify this with something official from Leica. But, it seems to be common knowledge that Leica does have a reduced beam divergence versus most other lrf.
    If you can, are you able to test drive any of these models? I don't think you'll be unhappy with a Leica. But, believe it or not, there have been Leica users who have traded in for a Sig, but it's usually been for a 2400+ model. The Leupold is so new, and I still haven't been able to play with it in person. Called every store in my city and they didn't have any on their shelves yet.

    I hope other people weigh in. When I get the chance to have a Leica, I will. I'm obsessed so eventually I'll end up owning one from each brand. Working my way towards it :D

    btw, found this LRH thread on this very topic: leica 2000b vs sig 2200
     
  6. Rflamm250

    Rflamm250 Well-Known Member

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    I was in the same boat a few months back. I ended up getting a Leupold rx2800. SO far I like it, although I have not had the chance to really reach out with it. At 1000yrds and in it has worked great. I also have a Leica 1000R and the Leupold is much easier to acquire targets.
     
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  7. lancetkenyon

    lancetkenyon Well-Known Member

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    I have a Leica 1600B and a G7 BR2. I use the Leica more. Very fast, very small, very light, very accurate. I have ranged out past 1800 yards on trees, rocks, etc. I have hit elk and deer out past 1300.
     
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  8. Dog Rocket

    Dog Rocket Well-Known Member

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    Nikon Black 4K.
     
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  9. WildBillG

    WildBillG Well-Known Member

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    If it were my choice and for a mere 100 dollars more I'd get the Leica. I have a friend who has the 1600b and he uses it as his binos pretty much to a half hour after sunset. You will not likely be able to that with the Sig or Leupold models.
     
  10. Hand Skills

    Hand Skills Well-Known Member

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    ^this
     
  11. Kimber7man

    Kimber7man Well-Known Member

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    Buy once, cry once. I picked up the Leica 2000 from euro optic for $399 and it was rock solid on my WY hunt.
     
  12. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    I just picked up the new Leupold 2800. It does everything I want and so far I'm terribly impressed with the ranging ability.

    I've been easily ranging cattle in wheatfields at over a mile on clear days.

    I was pretty well set on one of the new Sig's but for the price difference I just couldn't justify it.
     
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  13. jbail1

    jbail1 Active Member

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    I’ve been using the Leica 1600B for a couple years now. It’s a solid little unit. The glass is excellent and the range finder is accurate. Lots of times I’ll leave my binos at the house on bow hunts and just use the LRF. Also have a Leupold 1000Rx (pretty’s sure that’s the model). It’s ok but the Leica is in a whole different league.

    I’ve only found a need to range past 1500 yards on very rare occasions and for those instances, I pull out the Leica Geovids.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2018
  14. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    I would recommend that First you decide what you expect from a LRF Based on your needs and the maximum range you intend to use it and then evaluate what you need to fill these requirements.

    Keep in mind that if a LRF has a maximum range of 1000 yards, most of the time due to conditions it may only give decent results to around 800 yards. This is common to all LRFs. and the ratings are normally for ideal conditions.

    If you plan on getting good service at 1500 yards, I would recommend something with a 2000 yard rating. If you want something in this range, there are lots of LRFs that can fill your needs, that don't cost an arm and a leg. Look at the size and features and decide what best fits your needs.

    The next step In price is the ballistic LRFs. and they can be very expensive, but with proper programming can minimize time and increase good shot placement percentages. So in the long run, improve the success and cost (More bang for the buck).

    There are 2 or 3 of these types of LRFs that are very good and it becomes a matter of choice as to which one has the features you Need for the cost you can afford.

    I have owned 5 different range finders, starting with mechanical and ending up with a ballistic LRF and I wish they were available when I first started using them instead of Mil Dots In the scope. (I could have saved you lots of money and only owned one).

    There are lots of low end range finders so don't let the price guide you. Buy the best you can afford or even split the cost with your
    Girlfriend and get the best you can.

    Just My recommendation

    J E CUSTOM
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2018