The Life cycle Of A Bear....

Wedgy

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Feb 9, 2013
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Bears start life as cute little cubs
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Then, bears like to do a little swimming in the mud
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Then, bears get big and fat
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Then, bears forget that they are delicious, and they get shot
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Then, bears get skinned and butchered
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Then, bears get seasoned and beautifully browned
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Then, bears get braised for 4-5 hours
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Then, bears get shredded
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Then, bears get placed into tacos
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Finally, bears get eaten. The end.
 
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AmityPaBearHunter

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Hit the nail on the head. My family loves a bear roast with 10 lbs of potatoes and a lb of carrots. (There is 6 of us)
 

cat26fish

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Awesome post. I love putting a trail cam on a water tank in bear country, they don't just drink they swim in it.
 

memtb

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Great post! I’m not sure I’d take bear over anything as Wayne Allen.....but, we do like bear. Of the (3) spring bear we’ve taken, they were delicious. Our last bear, killed by my wife....we had to throw away. I don’t know what he was eating, to fatten-up for winter, but when cooking it...the smell would make you leave the kitchen. And, the taste was beyond description! Maybe all he had to eat was “boar” mink and skunk! :D memtb
 
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Alibiiv

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Great post! I’m not sure I’d take bear over anything as Wayne Allen.....but, we do like bear. Of the (3) spring bear we’ve taken, they were delicious. Our last bear, killed by my wife....we had to throw away. I don’t know what he was eating, to fatten-up for winter, but when cooking it...the smell would make you leave the kitchen. And, the taste was beyond description! Maybe all he had to eat was “bore” mink and skunk! :D memtb
Been perusing through the various forums this morning, I like to bear hunt so I was checking out the various threads. I bear hunt in Maine over bait. About five years ago I harvested a bear that stunk so bad it never made it into any pot and had to throw it away it smelled do bad. I've had a couple of Maine guides tell me that every so often they will come across a bear that smells really bad. We eat bear meat all year round. I am not a roast or bear steak person because I like to eat my meat on the rare side and I fear trichinosis from the bear meat. I have a game meat processor who makes great hamburger and sweet Italian sausage. The processor uses the fat from prime rib when he grinds the hamburg and sausage meat. I like making chili with half hamburger and half Italian sausage, very tasty. Bear meatballs and sausage in a pasta sauce is a great treat also.
 

LoneTraveler

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Feb 7, 2014
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Bear meat depends a lot on what the bear eating prior to kill, And circumstances just before kill. And age of bear.
In my job as a wildlife officer for over 15 years in bear country I learned some important things about bears.
If a bear fattens on Beech Nuts. When you render the fat you get what looks like cooking oil, Pretty amber colored oil, At room temperature.
If a bear fattens on White Oak Acorns. When you render the fat you will get a pretty white firm fat, Looks like pork lard, White in color at room temperature.
If a bear is shot that has been eating good food and not excited chances are the meat will be good.
If it is being run, fought and treed by dogs. The more you chew it the bigger it get in your mouth some times.
I like 2 knives to work on a bear. One knife to open the cuts on the hide. About like cutting sand paper the way it will dull a knife. Once inside the hide a good sharp knife to cut the hide loose from the fat.
When you skin a bear take your time and carefully cut the hide away from the fat. Leave the fat on the carcass, Like skinning a Beaver. I have seen bear hides with a lot of fat not freeze quick and the hair slip before it gets frozen.

I worked part time in a taxidermy shop before I became a wildlife officer so I had finish skinned many hides for Rugs and mounts to practice on.
When I cut the feet off, I saw or chop the leg bones about 4 inches above the foot. Gives a place to tie off the foot at eye level for easy skinning out the feet. Separate and skin each toe to the claw.
Take your time and do not cut holes in the hide. The taxidermy shop I worked in the owner figured 2 bullet holes in hide to repair. Knife cuts he charged to repair 25.00 a cut.
Just passing on some experience I learned the hard way.
 

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