The importance of Camo clothing when hunting Pronghorn?

bgouin

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Looking at a guided hunt in New Mexico for pronghorn, and have been reading through the various threads on essential equipment, but had not seen mention on camo clothing. I've never hunted Pronghorn before. Closest thing would be (in my mind) hunting Springbuck or Blesbuck in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. I hunted them both on sheep ranches, all grass and termite mounds. Springbuck was never able to get closer than 400 yards, but then we didn't stalk them by crawling through the grass (besides prickly pear there was some kind of jointed cactus with vicious thorns). I was just wearing earth color shirts and pants, neutral stuff.
Would a grass pattern clothing be best, or is just wearing neutral colors OK? Would like to hear opinions.
Thanks in advance.
We hunt pronghorns in Montana and are required to wear 400 sq-in of blaze orange above the waist during rifle season.
 

Dean2

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Antelope have GREAT eyesight. Any movement they are going to see. for sure so unless you have topography to hide you, the Antelope knows you are there. If you need to stalk antelope there are two great light decoys made of cloth and a light frame. One does in fact look like a cow and will let you and a partner sneak up to within bow range of Antelope. The other is an actual doe Antelope decoy, they work great, but you have to be very careful where you use those if does are open too and you need one for each person. The cow decoy will hide two guys easy meanng one can carry the gun and the other carry the decoy. We have never worried about wearing camo. Hope you have a great trip.
 

Trogon

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Antelope have GREAT eyesight. Any movement they are going to see. for sure so unless you have topography to hide you, the Antelope knows you are there. If you need to stalk antelope there are two great light decoys made of cloth and a light frame. One does in fact look like a cow and will let you and a partner sneak up to within bow range of Antelope. The other is an actual doe Antelope decoy, they work great, but you have to be very careful where you use those if does are open too and you need one for each person. The cow decoy will hide two guys easy meanng one can carry the gun and the other carry the decoy. We have never worried about wearing camo. Hope you have a great trip.
Thank you, I will look into using a cow decoy for this hunt, from what I've read that can really help cut the range for the shot.
 

Barrelnut

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Yea, don't think camo will help you much. Best to approach them using small depressions in the terrain to your advantage. This is why you need good knee pads and gloves that the cactus can't penetrate. You could be crawling for a ways.
Another thing that works well is approach them with the sun to your back as soon as it comes over the horizon. This has worked well for me. They don't like to look into the early morning sun and will feed with their backs to it. They don't move much at night. So if you can put them to bed and get on them at first light with the sun to your back, no camo needed. Good Luck!
 

Bob Wright

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Can't hurt to find something that matches the terrain/foliage you'll be in. Although the does saw me at 250 yards while doing my slithering, the buck didn't do anything until I shot him at 150 with a muzzle loader. If they're rutting, bucks have one thing on their mind. Getting smacked with a bullet wasn't ranking up there with this guy. Maybe a bit of luck in this event as the does were stomping and bouncing trying to get the buck to go. What a comical sight!
 

littlebighorn

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Can't hurt to find something that matches the terrain/foliage you'll be in. Although the does saw me at 250 yards while doing my slithering, the buck didn't do anything until I shot him at 150 with a muzzle loader. If they're rutting, bucks have one thing on their mind. Getting smacked with a bullet wasn't ranking up there with this guy. Maybe a bit of luck in this event as the does were stomping and bouncing trying to get the buck to go. What a comical sight!
Bob is Wright!:)
If your hunt catches them in the rut you will need to fool the does way more than the bucks.
I've only hunted pronghorns where blaze orange was required, so knee pads and gloves for drawling may be more important than what camo you have. And yes cow decoys only work if the antelope are used to cows in the area.
Ask your outfitter. He'll know way better than a bunch of internet experts!
 

Dean2

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I had no luck at all with the cow decoy. It made em run on public ground. Got a fabric antelope (buck) and they ran at me.
If there aren't cows as a common animal in the pastures u are hunting then the cow decoy won't work nearly as well. Antelope decoys work very well all the time and I have seen them used successfully but I don't have the stones to use one myself, even on private land. I don't want an antelope bad enough to chance dressing up like one. 😉
 

cornstalker

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In my opinion.

Camo makes little difference. If you have to rely on camo to break up your outline in the country we hunt antelope in you are already screwed. Antelope eyesight is so good that eliminating line-of-sight and looking at them through the grass and sage, not over it, will allow you to slip in undetected. I wear tough pants with knee pads and leather gloves. I crouch and walk until about to breach line-of-sight. Then crawl on my hands and knees until the cover is too short, then crawl on my belly until I run out of cover. From there, I only move to set up for the shot when they are not looking in my direction. I don't guess it would matter if I was wearing hot pink or zombie green. Eliminating direct line-of-sight is the best way to defeat a pronghorn's threat detection system. Of course, standard wind discipline applies.

Extreme skyline discipline is required. They will pick you out in an instant from virtually any distance if you silhouette yourself.
 
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