Stock issues (Tikka) and build specs

Backcountry_IDN

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Jun 11, 2018
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Pocatello Idaho
My title might be misleading. I guess idk how to title it...

My tikka build Is coming along, it started out as a .243.

I got a hell of a deal on a package. Bought a basically new tikka t3x in .243 only 50 down the tube, and it came with a nightforce 20moa rail and ultralight rings as well as a nightforce shv 5-20x56 (exposed) all for $1250.... A steal I know.

I don't need a .243 so decided to re-barrel into a caliber I've always wanted (6.5-284)

I just got the barreled action back today from the Smith and the stock doesn't fit the barrel contour.

The barrel is a tad bigger (.635 to .670)

I'm wondering if I can use a Dremel and file out the barrel channel or should I just buy a new stock?

Now this is a lightweight pack rifle. If I go another direction with stock options I don't want to spend an arm and a leg. I'm not opposed to waiting and saving, but I'd really like to use it this season and start loading development here soon.

On a side note, if anyone has a stock they'd be willing to sell for a decent price or trade, let me know.



Here's my build specs:

Action: tikka t3x
Barrel: xcaliber 26in 1:7 6groove heavy Sporter
Stock: ????
Trigger: timney (on it's way)
Muzzle brake:???
Base: nightforce 20moa
Rings: nightforce ultralight
Optic: Leupold vx5hd

If anyone has any suggestions or opinions feel free to let me know!
 

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waspocrew

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Go with the above advice - sandpaper on a dowel and take out material. I did the same with my Savage stock and it came out great.
 

shortgrass

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A gunsmith wouldn't use a Dremel tool to open a barrel channel, why would you? The Dremel tool has limited uses for gunsmithing, and stock work isn't one of them. Is your stock a synthetic or one of the laminates? Either stock material, wrapping sand paper around a wooden dowel is the hard way. if you're going to do the work yourself, buy some barrel channel tools designed for the task. Having the right tools is half the battle won!
 

FEENIX

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A gunsmith wouldn't use a Dremel tool to open a barrel channel, why would you? The Dremel tool has limited uses for gunsmithing, and stock work isn't one of them. Is your stock a synthetic or one of the laminates? Either stock material, wrapping sand paper around a wooden dowel is the hard way. if you're going to do the work yourself, buy some barrel channel tools designed for the task. Having the right tools is half the battle won!
Agreed! While I have a couple of success stories using the dowel and sandpaper method, the next time I have to do it, I will be investing on (or similar) >>> https://www.brownells.com/aspx/search/productdetail.aspx?pid=6796&source=ir
 

Canhunter35

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For the little you need to open it up, sandpaper on a dowel will work fine, should take less than 20 min, just check your work and make sure you’re centering the relieved barrel channel with the barrel
 

shortgrass

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Depends upon what synthetic we're talking about. There's little hope if you're thinking about that injection molded black plastic stuff. That stuff is just nasty! Considering the others, H-S, Mc, B&C and the like, wood working tools will 'cut' these. With the low interest in stock work/making these days commercially made tools are becoming fewer and fewer. Brownells used to offer a barrel channel tool with an off-set handle that had about an 1 5/8 diameter Surform cutter that was about 1 1/2" long that would remove wood (or most synthetics) quickly. Dastra used to make an off-set handled tool for barrel channels in various diameters (3/4", 5/8" & 1/2"). Those had hand cut teeth, like #50 Patternmakers file. Those haven't been available for some time now. A lot of 'smiths, that do stock work/making end up making a lot of their own tools to meet the task at hand. A Dremel NOT being one of the tools used for work where you can see the lines (meaning the upper edges of the inletting. The "Surform" line of tools is made by Stanley Tool. A replacement blade (the round one, item # 21-291) can be cut down to desired length and attached to a homemade handle.
 

shortgrass

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Laminated wood is 'hard' on almost all wood working tools because of the glue. The tools in the link that FENIX posted are scrapers and are used for fine work as they remove only a little at a time. Use 'um where you don't want to over cut and leave big gaps.
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