Stock Grip Shape: Old School or Modern

texagvet23

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Putting together a new hunting rifle, and I am struggling to decide on a stock. I grew up shooting Weatherby vanguards and basically nothing else. I have considered a Bell and Carlson stock for the familiarity, but I like the look and quality of something like the AG Composites Alpine Hunter or Manners EH-1. Is the transition to the different shaped grip difficult, and is there an advantage to one over the other?
 

texagvet23

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For what reasons...? If nothing else, they all look particularly difficult to shoulder sling carry and, just in my view, they are butt ugly. Not looking to be combative, just looking for and offering differing opinions...
So for the shoulder sling part, I would probably use QD mounts on the side, making it a little easier to carry regardless. I think they look better than thumbhole stocks but probably not as nice as a classic style stock. But yes, I am just searching for particular advantages vs disadvantages, particularly in respect to shooting form and consistency.
 

QuietTexan

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Which one do you shoot better? I find vertical more comfortable and easier to pull into my shoulder pocket since I shoot mainly off a front rest or a bipod with a rear bag. If I was shooting with a sling than a pistol grip would be better.

Search me for how people used to shoot straight gripped Winchesters. The human body must have been shaped differently back then, an extra elbow somewhere and a big knot in your shoulder for the crescent buttplate. Or... they just shot in a different position where it made sense. Manual of arms change over time, you don't see the tacticool guys shooting their ARs from a bladed stance, but service rifle guys will.
 

texagvet23

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Which one do you shoot better? I find vertical more comfortable and easier to pull into my shoulder pocket since I shoot mainly off a front rest or a bipod with a rear bag. If I was shooting with a sling than a pistol grip would be better.

Search me for how people used to shoot straight gripped Winchesters. The human body must have been shaped differently back then, an extra elbow somewhere and a big knot in your shoulder for the crescent buttplate. Or... they just shot in a different position where it made sense. Manual of arms change over time, you don't see the tacticool guys shooting their ARs from a bladed stance, but service rifle guys will.
This is where I have a problem, as I've never shot a pistol style grip other than on an AR-15 that's my dedicated hog gun. I think it would help my shooting skills to use a pistol grip for long range, but I can't know for certain. Unfortunately, it's an expensive mistake to make if it doesn't work.
 

8x68s

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I really like a more vertical grip on rifles that I shoot prone often. I much prefer a more classic grip on rifles that I will carry for long periods of time. So looking at my rifles it is kinda obvious what ones are more target and practice rifles and the ones that are more specifically hunting rifles.
ok, I can see a definite advantage for prone... thanks neighbor!
 

QuietTexan

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Just to clarify a bit by "pistol" I mean the traditional pistol grip, like you would find paired with a monte carlo comb, a "traditional rifle stock". I googled and I guess "semi-pistol" is the correct term in rifle parlance. Your wrist is broken forward more which gives the hand more leverage on the gun, and fits your arm in better as the stance gets more offset. The prone position has straightened out significantly in recent times as front rests have replaced slings and removed the support hand from the front of the rifle.

I don't have any chassis bolt action rifles so the only thing I have with AR grips are ARs. I do have vertical grip stocks like the Alpine Hunter, and prefer that style.
 

texagvet23

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Just to clarify a bit by "pistol" I mean the traditional pistol grip, like you would find paired with a monte carlo comb, a "traditional rifle stock". I googled and I guess "semi-pistol" is the correct term in rifle parlance. Your wrist is broken forward more which gives the hand more leverage on the gun, and fits your arm in better as the stance gets more offset. The prone position has straightened out significantly in recent times as front rests have replaced slings and removed the support hand from the front of the rifle.

I don't have any chassis bolt action rifles so the only thing I have with AR grips are ARs. I do have vertical grip stocks like the Alpine Hunter, and prefer that style.
I appreciate your input. This is going on what I'd refer to as my western-type hunting rifle (6.5 PRC) that will be used for mule deer, pronghorn, and maybe an occasional elk with a different barrel on it. I understand not all of my shots will be prone, but maybe kneeling off of a tripod. Do you feel like the AG style grip hinders your shooting at all in those situations?
 

QuietTexan

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Shooting off a tripod I like a vertical grip, because usually I'm pretty squared up behind the rifle and holding a pack or something under the butt with my support hand. If you aren't putting your support hand out on the foregrip in any given position I think you'll find vertical more comfortable.

Try this. Sit square to the desk in front of you (I'm assuming you're at a computer). Put your right arm up like you're about to arm wrestle. I bet your wrist is straight and not broken down at an angle. Lay the arm down until your forearm is on the desk. No break in the wrist feels nice and relaxed right? You can roll the hand left and right pretty easily, palm down or back of the hand down. Bring your elbow back in tight to your body. The unbroken loose fist vertical should feel more neutral than breaking your wrist downward.

Now get unsquare. Reach as far out and away with your left hand as you can and put it on the table. Put your right arm back into the arm wrestling position, then lay it down to point towards your left hand. You should feel the contact point of your elbow roll inwards. Not quite so on the point of the elbow anymore, more on the knob on the inside of your elbow. Roll your right wrist to the right again. Bet you can't get the back of your hand flat to the table without muscling it there, because your forearm is now naturally laying inward slightly. Lift your elbow up like a shooting stance. Breaking the wrist slightly to keep your hand vertical should feel more comfortable the higher your elbow gets.

This isn't a perfect example, but to me it shows shooting square is easier with a vertical grip because it's more neutral, especially with a low elbow that's on something for support. Shooting a bladed stance is easier with a broken wrist because as your elbow gets higher the broken wrist is more neutral.
 

texagvet23

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Shooting off a tripod I like a vertical grip, because usually I'm pretty squared up behind the rifle and holding a pack or something under the butt with my support hand. If you aren't putting your support hand out on the foregrip in any given position I think you'll find vertical more comfortable.

Try this. Sit square to the desk in front of you (I'm assuming you're at a computer). Put your right arm up like you're about to arm wrestle. I bet your wrist is straight and not broken down at an angle. Lay the arm down until your forearm is on the desk. No break in the wrist feels nice and relaxed right? You can roll the hand left and right pretty easily, palm down or back of the hand down. Bring your elbow back in tight to your body. The unbroken loose fist vertical should feel more neutral than breaking your wrist downward.

Now get unsquare. Reach as far out and away with your left hand as you can and put it on the table. Put your right arm back into the arm wrestling position, then lay it down to point towards your left hand. You should feel the contact point of your elbow roll inwards. Not quite so on the point of the elbow anymore, more on the knob on the inside of your elbow. Roll your right wrist to the right again. Bet you can't get the back of your hand flat to the table without muscling it there, because your forearm is now naturally laying inward slightly. Lift your elbow up like a shooting stance. Breaking the wrist slightly to keep your hand vertical should feel more comfortable the higher your elbow gets.

This isn't a perfect example, but to me it shows shooting square is easier with a vertical grip because it's more neutral, especially with a low elbow that's on something for support. Shooting a bladed stance is easier with a broken wrist because as your elbow gets higher the broken wrist is more neutral.
That makes a ton of sense. I really appreciate the help. I'll have to do some thinking about how I'll be shooting mostly, but this is a huge help.
 

manitou1

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Mar 27, 2012
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Missouri
I tried the more vertical grip stocks and ended up going back to traditional. I am a hunter and target shooting is just preparation for my hunting. The standard grip fits my needs best, for shooting and carrying. It is just a matter of personal preference.
Some of us like slow, heavy bullets, some like lighter, faster cartridges. Just preference.
 

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