Stock configuration

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by willtim, Oct 21, 2019.


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  1. willtim

    willtim Well-Known Member

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    What are the advantages/disadvantages of a sporting stock vs. a tactical stock (vertical grip)? I am planning my next build. It will be a trued Remington short action with a 20 inch Bartlein 3b fluted barrel. Either .243 Win (my heart wants) or 7mm-08 Rem (my brain says). Use will be 80% tree stand hunting for whitetail. I am not a big guy (5'8'', 160 pounds) and want a light handling rifle. Thanks for your advice.
     
  2. just country

    just country Well-Known Member

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    morning, myself use the H&S tactical. I have SA & LA actions.
    weight and fit r the differences. a sporter stock will
    be a look, fit, and weight for ur build. myself prefer tactical.
    the prefer the 243AI. justme gbot tum
     
  3. willtim

    willtim Well-Known Member

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    No advice?
     
  4. Jud96

    Jud96 Well-Known Member

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    For a light weight rifle I would do a sporter style stock. Most tactical stocks are heavy, bulky, and not really suited for light rifles.
     
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  5. dfanonymous

    dfanonymous Well-Known Member

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    I’m just going to divide this between sporter stock and heavy modular stock as I can’t say a vertical grip is “tactical.”

    Heavy modular stock-
    Pros:
    Weight allows better recoil management
    Good ones can be adjustable
    Often is pillared or in general allows better action screw torque
    Can be modular depending on brand and model

    Cons:
    Heavy/ier
    Might not need modularity
    More expensive
    Some people don’t know how to shoot with a vertical grip believe it or not. They grip it like an ar15 and introduce unnecessary hand torq

    Sporter-
    Pros:
    Cheaper
    Light weight


    Cons:
    Cheaper
    Not modular usually
    Sometimes has more flex in stock.

    Lastly, I vote the 7mm-08. Reason is you can pretty much use it for all of North America at more various ranges. Gives you options for later, if you decide to change the build.
     
  6. lancetkenyon

    lancetkenyon Well-Known Member

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    What do you consider "heavy"?
    My EH1 and EH2 weigh 26oz each.

    All depends on personal preference. I like a tactical style shape myself. I have 8 tactical style stocks.
    EH1
    EH1
    EH2
    PRS2
    PRS2
    PRS2
    Game Scout
    Game Warden adjustable
     
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  7. Mram10us

    Mram10us Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    I second the manners eh1 or eh5 if you like thumbholes.
     
  8. philipbrousseau

    philipbrousseau Well-Known Member

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    Remington mountain rifle or sporter stock by McMillan and I would not even consider the 243
     
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  9. codyadams

    codyadams Well-Known Member

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    I prefer a stock with a higher comb, specifically so I can get a more consistent cheek weld. With sporter stocks it is much harder to get a consistent cheek weld on your jaw bone vs your cheek bone on a stock with a higher comb. The verticle grip is better if your shooting prone in my opinion. If you have a sporter stock, a solution is a stock pack or adjustable cheek hardware, though this adds some weight.

    Tactical style stocks can be just as light as sporter or wood stocks, sometimes lighter. Mcmillan, Manners, AG composites, and several others make them that come in well under 2 lbs, they just generally cost $500+ new. You can get a sporter stock from B&C that weighs the same as carbon tactical stocks for only $275.

    For your use, I would either go with a sporter stock with a stock pack or adjustable cheek hardware or some stock with a high cheek rest. A McMillan A3 with light fill or Manners EH-1 would both be good options, I have held and used both and like them.
     
  10. Holycity73

    Holycity73 Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    There’s also the hybrid style. I have an eh4 on my shorty creed that bridges the GAO between hunter and tac. It’s al personal preference...
     
  11. Mram10us

    Mram10us Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    For the money, a bc Alaskan or CA carbon sporter are hard to beat.
     
  12. willtim

    willtim Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the advice.
     
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  13. Wolf76

    Wolf76 Well-Known Member

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    I like thumbhole stocks-especially from a treestand-because you'll be holding the gun with 1 hand as you turn to get into position. If you go with a Sporter stock, I'd lean towards a weatherby Monte Carlo style. The tactical style stocks are nice if you have a solid rest for shots-don't consider them optimal for freehand shots. This is just my opinion. Good luck.
    Definitely get the 7/08-much better round for deer.
     
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  14. Paper boy

    Paper boy Member

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    Over the years I have come to LOVE the GRS Brand of stocks. they are sencably priced, excellently built and are available for just about every shooting disapline. I have also come to appreciate eurooptics.com. wonder selecti , best service in the industry, and the most experienced staff. Located in PA.
     
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