SS pins - a note of caution

Pdyson

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Joined
Nov 25, 2013
Messages
275
Location
Brownwood Texas
I always inspect under a light that allows me to see the bottom of the case as I take them out of the media separator and onto the towel before going into the dehydrator. Even as careful as I am, about once in five washings I would miss a pin (usually two) jammed in a primer flash hole which I always have to pull out with needle nose pliers. The decaping pin in resizing die always caught them in the past…until I changed my process. I now resize after I anneal and before I wash. I switched to sunshine media which is stainless steel chips. They don’t get stuck in the case or flash hole.
 

jrg

Active Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2013
Messages
44
Location
N.East Texas
I always have the LabRadar running while shooting at our club. A shooter a few benches away asked if I would shoot his 300WBY to determine the velocity of his reloads. My equipment is set up for a left hand shooter so I shot the rifle rather then having him shoot it "over the screens" himself.

After the shot I ejected the shell which landed on the concrete slab. I noticed immediately that a few kernels of powder fell from the case. Looking closer I realized that they were actually two blackened SS pins! I asked if he was using a SS pin tumbler and he acknowledged that he was.

It made me wonder how many pins may have been in that load and what they could do to a barrel. Who even knows about the safety aspect of pins in a full pressure load?

Just a reminder to use due diligence when handloading because unexpected errors do happen.
We stopped using pins because they would get hung up inside the brass & ding the necks, Started using Brass Juice & it works just as well without the hassle.
 

BrentM

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Jan 10, 2013
Messages
3,324
Location
Meridian, Idaho
It's a process. I rinse several times with hot water to remove soap etc and then Drop them in a towel and shake the p!ss out of them. I repeat this a few times and have no issues with pins. I think if you drop the cases on a towel etc and don't shake they can easily dry in place.
 

Ken61

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Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
180
I sold my SS pin set up because, as has been stated, it is a pain to use.. I didn't see any need for them.. Walnut or corn cob media works for me and it is easier to use. Of course I have to be careful that it is all cleaned out of the case but it doesn't gouge the barrel.

.
 

gophernator

New Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2018
Messages
4
Location
Kansas prairie
I deleted the pins. Soap, Lemi Shine and warm water. Works like a champ.
I have recently been experimenting with Dawn Power wash as a substitute for Lemi Shine. Works like magic in a sonicator at 5 squirts per half gallon on 223 and 9mm brass. No adverse effects on brass after 5 reloading/firing cycles.
 

orcldba

Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2013
Messages
20
Good old walnut (lizard litter with a teaspoon of red rough added). I was looking at converting to SS pins but I think I’ll stick with the vibrating tumbler and ground media.
 

johngibbs222

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Joined
Jun 15, 2012
Messages
126
OP, Did the reading on the labradar seem suspicious?
AsI only ever neck size on my own brass, I stopped tumbling my 223 and 308 brass as it was a pita to get the bits of shell out. I clean up the outside with fine steel wool, don't bother with the neck or the primer pocket and it doesn't seem to affect the accuracy in my rugers #1and #3, in fact the 308 #1 has subsequently given me my best 3 shot group at 100 metres of around 1/2" which is plenty good for my kinda hunting, it's also repeatable if I do my bit. It's as accurate as the #3 right now.
 

jimwest

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Joined
Nov 29, 2016
Messages
70
Location
Santa Barbara
I still use the Frankford SS wet tumbler. But I did switch from the stainless pins to the stainless chips.

I find that they do a better job of cleaning out both the inside of the case and the primer pockets.

Checking the inside of each case is a must for safety. Takes a bit longer, but results are great.
 

tony d willIiams

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2019
Messages
201
Location
San Bernardino Mountains
I always have the LabRadar running while shooting at our club. A shooter a few benches away asked if I would shoot his 300WBY to determine the velocity of his reloads. My equipment is set up for a left hand shooter so I shot the rifle rather then having him shoot it "over the screens" himself.

After the shot I ejected the shell which landed on the concrete slab. I noticed immediately that a few kernels of powder fell from the case. Looking closer I realized that they were actually two blackened SS pins! I asked if he was using a SS pin tumbler and he acknowledged that he was.

It made me wonder how many pins may have been in that load and what they could do to a barrel. Who even knows about the safety aspect of pins in a full pressure load?

Just a reminder to use due diligence when handloading because unexpected errors do happen.

I use a sonic cleaner. 1st bath, heated with old solution, primers removed. Rinse and use fresh solution. Rinse again with RO water.
For my pistol rounds, I am not as particular. But I only shoot 30 yards or less with those.
 

Carlos88

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2020
Messages
791
Location
Benbrook TX 76126
I just bought some stainless steel chips. 1lb, $22.00 shipped. I'll try most reloading doo-dads. If they work itll be another tool in the shed.

 

Dr. Vette

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Joined
Dec 30, 2009
Messages
2,667
Location
Holland, MI
The stainless pins were a pain to separate when I did them by hand.

I purchased the STM Media Separator, and they're clean in seconds. SO much easier than before, and I have yet to have any pins left in any cases.
The only time I have to be careful is with 257 Weatherby cases, as the internal neck is about the same size as the pins, so they get stuck crossways in there. I have never had any left in my 300 Wby cases as in the original post, or any other cases.

Technique can make all the difference.
 
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