Solo backpackers ???

PHunter

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Joined
Jan 24, 2010
Messages
18
I solo Backpack for deer in October.
Keep my wife informed with detailed info on exact hunt camp coordinates and info.
Last fall too much snow and had to hunt lower.
I missed the high country experience
 

-WARDOG-

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Jun 24, 2021
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92
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Elk City, Idaho
I am also a solo hunter. Most of my hunter friends don't take hunting as serious as I do, or are sorely out of shape. After years of military then law enforcement, I have turned a bit anti-social. I truly have a better time hunting by myself. I see more, hear more, can geek out on nature and it's sounds without having another person who is barely interested beebopping through the woods, talking, fussing with poor equipment, breaking branches and kicking rocks.
I also carry a personal locator beacon, currently an In-Reach.
In 2012 I got into quite a predicament. Briefly, I was hunting about 8 miles from camp, and about 40 miles from the nearest paved road in the high Sierras of northern California. I shot a nice blackie but was having trouble getting to him in a gully. I ended rolling my atv into the gully with me on it. I was banged up bad with some nasty gashes and a dislocated shoulder. Nobody but me and the bear knew where I was. I almost requested help with my beacon when I could feel the onset of traumatic shock, but decided to bandage up and self rescue. It took me 11 hours to make it back to camp without my bear. Many were out looking for me but they were too out of shape to get off the roads. I was laid up for three days and lost the meat from the bear (the worst part).
My years of training and outdoor experience is what got myself out without panicking and becoming a statistic.
Since I hunt deep woods solo, my pack is heavier with enough medical aid, food, water etc to get me through two nights unplanned.
Since then I update my locations with my beacon and leave a note with some responsible of the general area I will be in.
On numerous occasions I have been close enough to shake hands with black bears and cougars. I can read most animals. I pay attention and never let my guard down while hunting. Unfortunately, I now have 3 or more grizzlies within 8 miles of my house. I really don't want to mess with them.
 

treelinehntr

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Joined
Jun 26, 2021
Messages
16
Location
Colorado
Yep, most of my big hunts are all solo. My hunting partners don't tend to take days off work. I used to spend two weeks during archery season out, just me and my mules. I carry the inreach.
 

Coyote Shadow Tracker

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Social Circle, GA
One RULE!
It is better to Have it and Not Need it than Need It and NOT Have it!

I trained for extreme sports for many years, mountain climbing, & Hunting. I have hundreds + of miles backpacking the App Trail through GA & TN since in the East this is where there are the highest (6,500 ft) elevations are. ALONE! for weeks at a time.
Pack what you absolutely need because of weight, but also think of the unexpected. Even a little thing like a Paracord bracelet with 15' of cord could save your life. Think about how to self extract/medically treat-there are plenty of books out there-information to help you plan. Make sure that you know more than just basic first aid. And always keep some survival items on you person and not just in your pack.
Hunting alone and packing in rugged or not so country can be dangerous. Make sure that you leave somewhat detailed info with family and friends of your hunt area and your time limits to come home.
I always carried several small kits for insect, snake, trauma-the unexpected. If you are going to be way in the outback a personal located is a good idea. This applies even if you are with someone else!
 
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Coyote Shadow Tracker

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I hear the same thing. And then I think

+ so I'm supposed to bring someone to watch me die?

+ the only ones capable of coming with me are on there own adventures

+ if I bring someone I have to worry about them

+ if they shoot something now I'm packing it out

Naaaaaa
I guess that's why we go on our own!
I always hunt alone with the exception with Jill hunting with me (and that's GREAT).
I occasionally take a family member/friend on a hunt and spend all my time as a guide. That is fun also to share experiences maybe teach something, maybe learn something, but the points mentioned by whirlwindjml - is why I hunt alone most of the time!
Good points wirlwhindjml!!!!!!!!!
 

KSB209

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Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
350
Location
Republic of California
One RULE!
It is better to Have it and Not Need it than Need It and NOT Have it!

I trained for extreme sports for many years, mountain climbing, & Hunting. I have hundreds + of miles backpacking the App Trail through GA & TN since in the East this is where there are the highest (6,500 ft) elevations are. ALONE! for weeks at a time.
Pack what you absolutely need because of weight, but also think of the unexpected. Even a little thing like a Paracord bracelet with 15' of cord could save your life. Think about how to self extract/medically treat-there are plenty of books out there-information to help you plan. Make sure that you know more than just basic first aid. And always keep some survival items on you person and not just in your pack.
Hunting alone and packing in rugged or not so country can be dangerous. Make sure that you leave somewhat detailed info with family and friends of your hunt area and your time limits to come home.
I always carried several small kits for insect, snake, trauma-the unexpected. If you are going to be way in the outback a personal located is a good idea. This applies even if you are with someone else!
100% agree with “better to have and not need……” which is why my pack always seems to be the heaviest and I always seem to be “loaning” equipment out to others. I’ll admit I’m not an Iron Man but my pack on 2-3 days trips always seem to be around 60 #’s when I go with a group. And I almost always seem to shed at least 5 pounds on the way our with people carrying stuff they used from my pack
 

whirlwindjml

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Aug 23, 2009
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595
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Rathdrum Idaho
20210729_115902.jpg

I just got a spot x. Now they can't say it's dangerous. If I get a sliver I can hit SOS and someone will bring me some tweezers.
 

2ndson

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Joined
May 14, 2020
Messages
123
Location
OK
I go solo on a lot of overnights. I do it to test gear and challenge myself to go lighter – sometimes in conditions I wouldn't want to subject others to (this weekend was 32 and rain, then dropping into the teens).

That said, I also have a friend who's keen to get out so I've been facilitating that by lending him gear – winter bags, mostly – and sharing my shelter.

I think the best way to find backpacking partners is right here. Add your location to your profile, to start.
 

mdruyle

Active Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2021
Messages
25
Location
Jacksonville fl
Yeah my wife and my dad tell me all the time it’s not safe to go out by myself but with my schedule I don’t always have a hunting partner so I go by myself. Usually I make it back to my truck and sleep inside or in the bed of the truck. How many of you go on backpack trips by yourself?
I sort of find it peaceful by myself in the woods even if it isn’t “safe” but that’s me. Some might find it boring but one thing I like is watching the sunrise and sun set over the mountains
Ive done the majority of my hunting as solo backcountry hunts. Until recently, I’ve felt pretty invincible. I just tore my patellar tendon which required surgery. I will now be packing a garmin Inreach which I never did before. I think planning for the worst and making sure you can get comms for an evac is a good idea. Watch the weather and have a plan.
 

Pro2A

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Joined
May 23, 2009
Messages
466
Ive done the majority of my hunting as solo backcountry hunts. Until recently, I’ve felt pretty invincible. I just tore my patellar tendon which required surgery. I will now be packing a garmin Inreach which I never did before. I think planning for the worst and making sure you can get comms for an evac is a good idea. Watch the weather and have a plan.
**** happens to all of us. Plan for the worst; hope for the best. Better to have and not need, than to need and not have. The over prepared come home with a smile. The under prepared may come home in a body bag. Dad has been gone 14-1/2 years and still gets smarter every year. Old too soon; smart too late. YMMV, but I doubt it..... :) :) :)
 

Mrvmax

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May 30, 2020
Messages
320
Location
Texas
I wish I has somewhere to go solo, Texas has very few places with decent game where it can be done. I am not in good shape but I would get into shape if I could that.

I am one of those people that always try to be prepared. A couple years ago when my dad was still alive I was in Missouri visiting him. While at the hotel I saw a tick on my wife (from a pet that stayed in the room prior to us being there - possibly). No problem, I pulled out my first aid kit where I had a tick remover. I reported the incident to the hotel staff and checked out of there.
 

mdruyle

Active Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2021
Messages
25
Location
Jacksonville fl
**** happens to all of us. Plan for the worst; hope for the best. Better to have and not need, than to need and not have. The over prepared come home with a smile. The under prepared may come home in a body bag. Dad has been gone 14-1/2 years and still gets smarter every year. Old too soon; smart too late. YMMV, but I doubt it..... :) :) :)
Old too soon, smart too late sums it up perfectly!
 
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