Slipping Scope

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Konrad, Feb 1, 2018.

  1. MagMan

    MagMan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,081
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2002
    Beat up a nice Swarovski on a 300 RUM because of it.
     
  2. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,437
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    My .338 RUM had to have a third ring, the scope slipped no matter what I did. Now I have a slightly lighter scope and placed the bubble level in front of the rear ring and torqued it to the same specs as the scope rings. Hoping maybe that will serve in somewhat manner as a third ring/parking brake, at least maybe a scope slip zero stop.:D
     
  3. Snyper708

    Snyper708 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    115
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2017
    That's probably what happened.

    The rings are made to fit a certain size, so lapping is only going to make them bigger. It's easy to over do things, trying to make them "better".

    I'd forget about the Loctite and the lapping and just put the parts together.

    It works for the vast majority of set-ups.
     
  4. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,675
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    +1! The XTRs are built like a tank and provides an additional 40 MOA of adjustment.
     
  5. 7stw

    7stw Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,604
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    I'll second JE' s thoughts on that. I believe you honed away the grip on your rings. You can get carried away with that quite easily. On weaver type , or picatinny rails, I like the LEUPOLD rings. The cross slot fits the groove rather snuggly, and haven't had isdues with slippage either.
    Years ago, I used to use, almost exclusively, Leupolds dual dove tail rings and bases. They align great, don't slip. One caveat is if you have mis drilled receiver , you can't adjust it out. But then again, you can't with pic rails, or weaver bases either. Just some thoughts and options.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2018
    J E Custom likes this.
  6. 7stw

    7stw Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,604
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Ouch
     
  7. johnnyk

    johnnyk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,819
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2001
    Me too! Back then I vowed to never go to the Picatinny type rail. I used the Leupold Std (windage screws) too and they actually made a LR base for Remington 700's (20MOA) and Win 70's (10MOA). Those bases with the Burris Signature STD rings allowed you to add serious MOA and maintain sleek lines.
    As a matter of fact, I have one setting on my desk right now. I recently traded a pistol for a 1st generation Sendero in .300 WinMag which had a STD LR base on it.
    You know Nightforce doesn't recommend (under no circumstances) these turn-in style rotary/dovetail-type ring and base designs(especially those equipped with windage adjustment) and says so on page 8 of their ATACR/NXS owners manual. Not sure I buy that.
    I know this is off topic a bit but I had to bust out! LoL. Johnnyk.
     
    7stw likes this.
  8. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,910
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    Here are some recommended torque values that May help.

    https://www.longrangehunting.com/threads/torque-recomendations.29756/

    These are based on the screw size and the material.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  9. Konrad

    Konrad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    94
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    There is still plenty of space between the top clamp and the bottom half of the ring. I don't believe I over -lapped the rings.
     
  10. Konrad

    Konrad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    94
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Back, long ago (yes, we had electricity then) I attended a class on fasteners that included proper torqueing techniques for bolts of many types. One fact often overlooked by folks is the listed torque values in most sources are for dry threads. Most thread engagement rarely goes over 75%. Adding a "lubricant" of any type (including thread locking compound) should lower the torque value by at least 10%.
    Also, the tensile testing machine during that class revealed that if a fastener is torqued properly and then loosened, it's tensile strength (the point at which the fastener shears) is reduced by at least 25% on the next tightening cycle.
    I replace scope mounting threaded hardware parts each time they are loosened.
     
    7stw likes this.
  11. mjkten

    mjkten Member

    Messages:
    16
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2014
    I read an article on this site just today where Jim See bedded the scope into the rings. He used release agent on the scope tube and J.B. Weld as the bedding into the ring itself.
    I have also read an article by Ross Seyfried where he used some sort of electrical insulating liquid rubber compound in the rings to lock the scope in place on particularly hard recoiling rifles.
     
    Konrad likes this.
  12. hunterdan

    hunterdan Active Member

    Messages:
    37
    Joined:
    May 7, 2011
    I have had great success with the Rosin.
     
    Barrelnut likes this.
  13. Barrelnut

    Barrelnut Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,990
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2013
    Some are in the know. I won't setup rings without it anymore.