Sleeping pad recommendations?

Professor

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Jan 15, 2019
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15
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Newnan Georgia
I’ve used a ton of sleeping pads and the Big Agnes Q-Core SLX in long /wide is very comfortable and has good insulation. It has larger outside tubes to keep you centered and is thick enough you can sit on it without your butt hitting the ground. 2 seasons now and still good. I put tyvek under it .
I bought the Big Agnes Q-Core SLX, long / wide because I kept rolling off everything else. If I let some air out my hips would hit the ground. I will use it for the first time next weekend chasing turkey.
 

Huskershooter6.5

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Aug 17, 2019
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48
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Nebraska
2nd the big Agnes q core slx. I survived a 6 degree night with it and 30 degree bag. Most recently used a thermarest neo air z therm, think it’s a little warmer than the big Agnes. Both are the rectangle versions that are both right at 16oz and pack to Nalgene size!
 

HuntnPack

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Feb 21, 2012
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The Wilderness
Upgraded My new sleep system: 😴😴

NEMO Men's Riff 15 Degree Sleeping Bag Med.

Exped SynMat UL Winter LW, Inflatable Sleeping Pad. 3.5”
ASTM F3340-18. R 5.0 rating


Therm-A-Rest Z Seat Pad

Therm-A-Rest Air Head Down Pillow

Seek Outside
Fearlessly Floorless Ground Sheet
 
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codyadams

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Jan 7, 2015
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Southwest Wyoming
I have really come to like the Klymit pads....this one is super comfortable if your going to be in colder weather, R value of 6.5, and 3.5" thick. It is big too, wider than the one you linked and nearly as long as their extra long model. The extra insulation does come with a little weight, about 7 ounces more.


From looking at the one you listed, it would be good in summer to fall weather. If your going to be in cold weather or possibly snow, I would look for something with more R value.
 

HuntnPack

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A good approach for me is to build a flexible sleeping system, with a means to
Make some comfort adjustments to that system.
For instance my Sleeping bag has vent & hood features to allow me to control temp.
I also utilize a ground cloth & or a reflective cloth, & a z pad as needed under my pad.


Several things to consider in pad selection:

Weight, thickness, size/shape, intended use, ie: seasonal / temp., Materials used,
& Design / Comfort features,
( some pads have noisy or slippery surface materials, or cold spots in between air chambers)

Total sleep system ie; shelter type,
floor / floorless, Bivy, Tarp.
Ground cloth, secondary foam pad,
pillow use, etc to name just a few.
Choose a pad to support your
sleeping bag / quilt temp ratings,

Thermal conductivity design. R value

(Not all manufacturers have adopted
Standardized R value rating procedures.
ASTM F3340-18.)
 
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jimss

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Mar 30, 2013
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162
I use neoair mentioned above when backpacking or traveling via air but still use my old thermarest when truck camping. The thermarests are pretty comfortable but heavier and bulky.
 

Professor

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Jan 15, 2019
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15
Location
Newnan Georgia
Well, hell, when car camping we use a heavy queen size blow up that uses a 12V pump. THAT is luxury.
I pack one in when setting up a camp. If I am only a few miles from the rd and staying more than one night I certainly will. I love the lightweight stuff, but old is old, and I am old.
 

codyadams

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Jan 7, 2015
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Southwest Wyoming
I pack one in when setting up a camp. If I am only a few miles from the rd and staying more than one night I certainly will. I love the lightweight stuff, but old is old, and I am old.
Only problem with the standard air mattress is they get cold as heck if the temp drops, no insulation!! I packed one in to a close camp one time, threw my regular pad on top of it. Was dang near as comfy as my memory foam mattress!!
 

svgreg

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America
Sea to Summit gear is pretty spendy, but well worth it in my experience. I use their Comfort Plus Insulated Air mattress nearly all the time. It packs down to 5x9 but is admittedly heavy at @ 29 oz. Personally, I sleep better on air mattresses and the thing I like about this one is the R factor of 4 and the fact that it has dual air chambers, so if I pop one, I'm not SOL sleeping on the ground. I've used it from Sept in ID to Feb in AK. Spendy but well worth it IMHO.
 

Wallrat

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Jun 21, 2020
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Location
Logan, MT
So wait...packing out a 600 pound elk isn’t a problem, but packing in 6 extra ounces for a bigger, more durable pad is? I have about 12 different pads and use the larger heavier, more durable models now. The longevity and comfort is worth it. After a few nights with a crinkly leaking pad, it was an easy decision.
 
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Litehiker

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Sep 15, 2012
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Mojave Desert, Nevada
The Big Agnes insulated pads are not nearly as warm or as light as the Thermarest NeoAir pads or the Sea to Summit and similar REI FLASH insulated mattresses.
I have both the REI 3 season FLASH Insulated air mattress and REI FLASH All Season winter air mattress. Both are comfortable and warm. And both have inflation valves that use the Sea to Summit dry bag/pump bag.

The Sea to Summit and REI Flash insulated air mattresses use synthetic fibers laminated to the inside top fabric and reflective lining on the inside bottom fabric. The Thermarest NeoAir 3 season and winter mattresses use only reflective linings and cellular construction for insulation.
Eric B.
 

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