Should I bother rebedding this?

7MMMagnum

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It has been my experience in bedding hundreds of rifles, that bedding unsupported parts of the action is a waste of time and materials.

Do you think those Nosler guys don't know what they are doing, and just did a "good enough" bedding on this rifle? I don't think so. The OP says it shoots well, and why do you think that is so? It is because it was done right.
You are probably right. I have no experience with Nosler and there bedding jobs. I have had to re-bed several other factory rifles that have been bedded only at the recoil lug that shot terrible until the original bedding was removed and the action was bedded correctly both lug and tang and in some cases full action. I think it all depends on the factory stock. I think McMillan stocks has a few videos on how they bed their stocks to the action. I am glad to see you have good luck with your method and your factory bedded rifles meet your needs and expectations.
 

ntsqd

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It has been my experience in bedding hundreds of rifles, that bedding unsupported parts of the action is a waste of time and materials.

Do you think those Nosler guys don't know what they are doing, and just did a "good enough" bedding on this rifle? I don't think so. The OP says it shoots well, and why do you think that is so? It is because it was done right.

Pardon my skepticism, but in a production rifle I think that the best that you can expect is "done well enough", not "done right." They just don't have enough time to do it as "right" as would someone doing a dedicated bedding job.

That said, I am sure that "done well enough" has been thoroughly researched, quantified, and qualified. So what got bedded was experientially determined to be the important bits and what didn't get bedded was determined to be too much effort and/or material for the gain.
 

UncleDano

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Pardon my skepticism, but in a production rifle I think that the best that you can expect is "done well enough", not "done right." They just don't have enough time to do it as "right" as would someone doing a dedicated bedding job.

That said, I am sure that "done well enough" has been thoroughly researched, quantified, and qualified. So what got bedded was experientially determined to be the important bits and what didn't get bedded was determined to be too much effort and/or material for the gain.
I don't call Nosler 48 a cheap production rifle. They are well made, not just "good enough" and you pay for that in a $3000+ rifle. Pillar bedding has well been established as a competent method.
 

chav0_12

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It has been my experience in bedding hundreds of rifles, that bedding unsupported parts of the action is a waste of time and materials.

Do you think those Nosler guys don't know what they are doing, and just did a "good enough" bedding on this rifle? I don't think so. The OP says it shoots well, and why do you think that is so? It is because it was done right.
I beg to differ. While I don’t think the Nosler guys don’t know what they’re doing, I do in fact think that they would do a “good enough” job on bedding an action. I didn’t say it shoots well. It shoots okay from what I’ve seen. With super basic handloads, middle of the spectrum it shot 1”, certainly nothing has been tuned with the load so I’d expect better from it. I’ll take your word for it that hundreds of actions later you’ve noticed no improvement as I only have a little more than a handful under my belt. I will say this bedding job looks no better than the bed job in my A-Bolts, a mass produced rifle. These rifles weren’t marketed for extreme precision, I’m not saying that it isn’t already there, but I do think they would’ve saved some time and money where they could without compromising the system.

I’ll wait to bed it, I was asking for opinions, because to me it looks half-a$$ed. I’ll get the trigger back and in, work a load up for it and see what it can really do. If I can’t get it where I think it should be the full action will get bedded.
 
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UncleDano

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You are probably right. I have no experience with Nosler and there bedding jobs. I have had to re-bed several other factory rifles that have been bedded only at the recoil lug that shot terrible until the original bedding was removed and the action was bedded correctly both lug and tang and in some cases full action. I think it all depends on the factory stock. I think McMillan stocks has a few videos on how they bed their stocks to the action. I am glad to see you have good luck with your method and your factory bedded rifles meet your needs and expectations.
McMillan does an excellent job, top of the line.
 

chav0_12

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I don't call Nosler 48 a cheap production rifle. They are well made, not just "good enough" and you pay for that in a $3000+ rifle. Pillar bedding has well been established as a competent method.
I do believe the Libertys were quite a bit cheaper than their newer carbon fiber barreled rifles with carbon stocks. Like their basic model sub $2k. I have noticed in the little time I’ve had this gun some minor fit and finish things that make me wonder.

On that same note, this seems to be in a Bell and Carlson stock or something very similar with an aluminum bedding block. The other Bell and Carlson stocks I have seem to be extremely similar, so that’s my guess. I will say the 28 Nosler in a B&C that I have shot much better after a full action bedding job, granted I never did just the lug as there didn’t seem to be any sense in it since I had the compound and the barreled action already prepped.
 
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UncleDano

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I beg to differ. While I don’t think the Nosler guys don’t know what they’re doing, I do in fact think that they would do a “good enough” job on bedding an action. I didn’t say it shoots well. It shoots okay from what I’ve seen. With super basic handloads, middle of the spectrum it shot 1”, certainly nothing has been tuned with the load so I’d expect better from it. I’ll take your word for it that hundreds of actions later you’ve noticed no improvement as I only have a little more than a handful under my belt. I will say this bedding job looks no better than the bed job in my A-Bolts, a mass produced rifle. These rifles weren’t marketed for extreme precision, I’m not saying that it isn’t already there, but I do think they would’ve saved some time and money where they could without compromising the system.

I’ll wait to bed it, I was asking for opinions, because to me it looks half-a$$ed. I’ll get the trigger back and in, work a load up for it and see what it can really do. If I can’t get it where I think it should be the full action will get bedded.
You said: "The rifle seems to shoot well enough, but only tried about 20 rounds" So I was under the impression that you were pleased with it so far.
So it sounds like you really want to re-bed this rifle. So have at it, have fun!
 

chav0_12

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You said: "The rifle seems to shoot well enough, but only tried about 20 rounds" So I was under the impression that you were pleased with it so far.
So it sounds like you really want to re-bed this rifle. So have at it, have fun!
Eh, idk that I REALLY want to do it. I’d rather not go through the trouble. That’s why I posed the question. I wanted to hear from guys like you that have more experience bedding actions than I do. For having personally, put 20 rounds though it, it seems to shoot well enough that I’m not super concerned with it, yet. I do need to develop a load for it first. But I was concerned enough about the simple recoil lug bed job that I thought I’d ask. Seems as though the consensus says, wait to shoot it to see if there are issues, which I think I will do instead of making a mess with epoxy and release agent.
 

CGHunter

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That action looks just like a new Weatherby Vanguard ! I just bedded 2 of these vanguards a couple months ago from the recoil to the back of the rear action screw. I'm kind of with everyone else if aint broke don't fix it. But if you feel uncertain about by all means fix it! The cost is way to hi to shoot that thing right now just to find out it doesn't shoot like you want it to. I will tell you it's a royal pain in the rear to bed that thing all the way back it took me about two days to do each one.
 

chav0_12

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That action looks just like a new Weatherby Vanguard ! I just bedded 2 of these vanguards a couple months ago from the recoil to the back of the rear action screw. I'm kind of with everyone else if aint broke don't fix it. But if you feel uncertain about by all means fix it! The cost is way to hi to shoot that thing right now just to find out it doesn't shoot like you want it to. I will tell you it's a royal pain in the rear to bed that thing all the way back it took me about two days to do each one.
You see, that’s what I’ve heard that it’s a Howa type action but I don’t remember the Vanguard I had in the past looking like that. I could’ve been too naive at the time to notice too. To me, it seems like the flat bottom would make it a little easier to do. Two days seems pretty standard for preparing and action and letting epoxy cure. I sure wouldn’t want to be fussing with it before then.
 

CGHunter

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It is Nosowaby for sure! The 2 days I mentioned in the previous post was no cure time 1day of prep and a day off clean up. a 700 action is about a 10th of the work. One of the biggest things I found was the front side of the recoil lug is angled and would hit in the corners of the factory stock not allowing the front action screw to tighten down all the way and make full contact to the bottom of the recoil lug and that screw would always come loose and have to be retorqued
 

ntsqd

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I don't call Nosler 48 a cheap production rifle. They are well made, not just "good enough" and you pay for that in a $3000+ rifle. Pillar bedding has well been established as a competent method.
Don't go putting words in my mouth. After 30-odd years working in various industries making things I've a reasonably good idea of what it takes to produce in a wide range of volumes. What is "good enough" depends on the target market, and if done in any volume exceeding one at a time customs there will have to be compromises made in the name of actually getting product out the door. What you have the time to do if your volume is one rifle a month means that there is not time to do everything the same way if your volume is one rifle a week. And further compromises need to be made if your volume needs to be 10 rifles a week. It is an inescapable fact of life. The really good companies work out a set of compromises that allow them to reach their target volume without impacting the value of their products. Producing one great rifle a week is hard enough work. Producing 10 of them in a week is an easy order of magnitude more difficult. Past a certain point adding more skilled people doesn't make things go faster. You have to design the rifle to be produced in the expected volumes and you have to design the build processes at the same time. When a major, disruptive, Electric Vehicle mfg. asked my current employer to go from 100 widgets a day to 1000 widgets a day we had to start over with the design of both the widget and the assembly line to build them. Those well versed in these widgets can tell the difference in them, but the end user will never know the difference.
 

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