Shooting long range help

doggonner

Member
Joined
May 31, 2020
Messages
14
Location
cave city ky
properly bedded action is a good place to start..no stress points then good barrel with good bullets and a cartridge known for easy tuning. ask me how I know this..it's a rabbit hole sometimes
 

ndking1126

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Joined
Sep 12, 2010
Messages
135
Typically if your rest is solid vertical stringing is a sign of a load issue, horizontal is shooter / wind. You need to shoot that load again to be sure
Plinker is a thinker.. keep shooting. My guess is wind, but certainly possible that it was a slight mistake by you compounded by wind.
 

Paper boy

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Joined
Jul 18, 2019
Messages
202
Location
Tennessee
I have been a long time member here but honestly not a long time long range shooter. My local range for many years only allowed 300 yards shooting and it was often crowded. Well My wife and I moved to our own property a few years back and I finally cleared out a 600 yard range. How do you know when working up loads if it is you, the weather (wind and such) or the load if your groups are not the greatest? My shooting range is not too effected by wind (most of it is a clear cut path through woods) so I think I can eliminate that from the equation. I would say maybe 100-200 yards of it is slightly open to winds. So for example, I recently worked up a load for my 28Nosler. At 100 yards it shoots between .6- .75MOA at 100 yards. I had 3 rounds left and said screw it im shooting 600 lol. at 600 I shot an 8 inch group with those 3 remaining loads. 2 of the hits were within 4 inches of each other and strung vertically for the most part but the other hit was in between the two height wise but was about 8 inches left. So for an in-experienced long range shooter, how would I know if I pulled that shot, or maybe the wind caught it or maybe there is an issue with my rifle system (bedding issue) or a problem with my load? I understand to truly know I likely need to shoot many more rounds, but im just trying to limit the rounds thrown down the tube to hopefully preserve the barrel. I do not intend to shoot this rifle a ton so would like to keep the tube as long as possible. I will never be hunting to 600 (400 yard max where I hunt) so really it is not too much of an issue but I do want to try to improve myself. I am pretty consistent when reloading so I don't think it is an issue with my loading process itself but could be an issue with my load. Thoughts?

FYI, I do not have people near me to shoot with to confirm if it is me or the load or the rifle etc or to have someone help in person.
1. Rifle bedding
2. Is barrel making contact with the stock anywhere along the stock?
3. Is the scope securley mounted to the rifle?
4. Is both the barrel and chamber clean?
5. What condition is your barrel in?
6. Is ammo consentric?
7. Is neck tention within limits?
8. Are your dies in good shape, clean and set up properly?
9. Is your powder stale or has it been kept moisture free and cool?

I know this is a long list and this is only a few factors that could caue your problems.
 

Bigeclipse

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Joined
Aug 10, 2012
Messages
1,831
1. Rifle bedding
2. Is barrel making contact with the stock anywhere along the stock?
3. Is the scope securley mounted to the rifle?
4. Is both the barrel and chamber clean?
5. What condition is your barrel in?
6. Is ammo consentric?
7. Is neck tention within limits?
8. Are your dies in good shape, clean and set up properly?
9. Is your powder stale or has it been kept moisture free and cool?

I know this is a long list and this is only a few factors that could caue your problems.
Rifle is factory bedded so I guess there could be potential issue there. All the other things except 9 are all good and I’ve checked. As for number 9 I keep my powders in my outdoor work room but it has a dehumidifier and keeps the room at 45% or less.
 
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BKM

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Joined
Oct 1, 2013
Messages
65
I am in NY. This load is Nosler brass, h1000 72.6grains, hammer 177 bullets, federal match primers. I did 10 round Satterlee test to find speed nodes. I found two. FYI, those 10 rounds in that Satterlee test all fell under an inch at 100 yards even though they varied in charge weights by .3 grains which I was hopeful meant the rifle likes these bullets. I then loaded up 6 rounds at the 72.6 grain weight. Shot 3 at the 125 yard target I had and got a .7inch group with no vertical spread what so ever so i thought maybe it was my trigger finger control (all horizontal stringing). That is when I said ill shoot the other 3 at 600 to see what happens.
Now that u can shoot 600 yds do ur ladder testing at this distance instead of 100.
One hundred yds just isn’t far enough imo.

Then shoot a lot. There’s really no other way to improve on urself other than practice.
It’s just a bbl.
 

Bigeclipse

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Joined
Aug 10, 2012
Messages
1,831
Now that u can shoot 600 yds do ur ladder testing at this distance instead of 100.
One hundred yds just isn’t far enough imo.

Then shoot a lot. There’s really no other way to improve on urself other than practice.
It’s just a bbl.
I really don’t want to burn this barrel out. I have a few other rifles I can do that with. My 6.5prc shoots lights out to 300 yards. Haven’t tried it at 600 yet though but I have confidence with that rifle. I’m just trying to work up a decent load for this rifle. The furthest hunting shot this rifle will see is 500 yards and chances of that are slim. Is e rifle unnecessary for short range? Yes but I just like the caliber lol if I could just get a decent group. We shall see I guess.
 

Blackhawk

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2018
Messages
185
Location
Florida
I have been a long time member here but honestly not a long time long range shooter. My local range for many years only allowed 300 yards shooting and it was often crowded. Well My wife and I moved to our own property a few years back and I finally cleared out a 600 yard range. How do you know when working up loads if it is you, the weather (wind and such) or the load if your groups are not the greatest? My shooting range is not too effected by wind (most of it is a clear cut path through woods) so I think I can eliminate that from the equation. I would say maybe 100-200 yards of it is slightly open to winds. So for example, I recently worked up a load for my 28Nosler. At 100 yards it shoots between .6- .75MOA at 100 yards. I had 3 rounds left and said screw it im shooting 600 lol. at 600 I shot an 8 inch group with those 3 remaining loads. 2 of the hits were within 4 inches of each other and strung vertically for the most part but the other hit was in between the two height wise but was about 8 inches left. So for an in-experienced long range shooter, how would I know if I pulled that shot, or maybe the wind caught it or maybe there is an issue with my rifle system (bedding issue) or a problem with my load? I understand to truly know I likely need to shoot many more rounds, but im just trying to limit the rounds thrown down the tube to hopefully preserve the barrel. I do not intend to shoot this rifle a ton so would like to keep the tube as long as possible. I will never be hunting to 600 (400 yard max where I hunt) so really it is not too much of an issue but I do want to try to improve myself. I am pretty consistent when reloading so I don't think it is an issue with my loading process itself but could be an issue with my load. Thoughts?

FYI, I do not have people near me to shoot with to confirm if it is me or the load or the rifle etc or to have someone help in person.
You have access to the perfect spotter provided that she is either a shooter herself ( a huge bonus ) , or willing to learn how to spot for you.
Answer is Your Spouse !
Why not make it a family fun day for both of you ,again with the proviso that she is willing !
 

Bob Wright

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Joined
Jan 23, 2018
Messages
689
Location
Litchfield Park, Az.
Just work on groups at 500 if that is your hunting limit. Tweaking your load is important of course. Your first time at distance, don't expect too much. You'll get there. It just takes reps and trying changes one at a time, to see if you're correcting your results. Since you have a home range, you could try 3 loads, then try 3 more with a tweak. Most of us would love that setup!
 

26Reload

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Joined
Dec 25, 2016
Messages
2,323
Location
SE Idaho
I taught myself to shoot a bow(almost 40 years ago)...
I practiced hard at 20 to 40yds.....paper plates were not hard to stay inside of at that range.....8-10"....
I was at a sporting goods shop talking with the owner..an UPS driver came in and started in our conversation....he turned and looked at his van and commented that he couldn't hit the radiator at that distance....well it was maybe 30yds...glad he wasn't bow hunting....imagine the wounded animals...
Any ways.... proficiency is the name of the game..i changed my shooting distance greatly...i started with a couple warm-up shots of 30....but practiced at 70..80(hedge)..90(yellow line in middle of road)..100 (was on opposite side of road)yes..waited for traffic often)....
But after all that long distance shooting..those 30 and 40 became gimmes......same goes for rifle shooting....
Get a good load...confidence load....use a small rock at 600yds or a huge chunk of steel painted white to see your hits....learn what that bullet will do with just a vertical holdover...learn it's drift....let the wind teach you what you need to know.....then adjust....have fun with it....do it with each rifle you have...prove to yourself they do what you think they should....
This is my first shooting at steel with my new and old 65284..
I didn't allow for what the wind was doing....i must have missed that 10" steel 22 times with the new rifle...as,i later figured out....
I grabbed my goto hunting rifle and dialed...shot the bungee cord off the left edge of the plate...had to go reattach it...old rifle again missed just left....third shot showed me I hadn't been off on height...just didn't believe the wind call correctly...
Top hit on plate....
So I redialed and sent three from the new rifle.....with correct wind.....those are the bottom three....
This distance was 875yds......
Now...i just need to get back out there and prove to myself it was not a fluke......
put trust into your system....that means you..your rifle..your loads.......
Make the effort...reap the rewards.....0527201321.jpg
 
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Recon$$

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Joined
May 24, 2011
Messages
215
One thing I tell less informed friends who ask me questions is what are you trying to accomplish? If your shooting .5/.75 moa on a rig your gonna shoot an elk or deer with at 500 and in, your good brother, just practice. If you shot that group at 400, I definitely do not see an issue, in fact, it's impressive. Guys get to worked up over a 10th of an inch on here sometimes. Long range hunting right? It's not a bench rest site.
 

L.Sherm

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2017
Messages
2,839
Guys who shoot BR 2-3" groups at 1000 start shooting 8-12" groups when conditions arent good.
The better you and your rifle shoot the less margin of error and theres alot of error in hunting ,wind, heart rate, excitement, rest, etc.
 

MTbackwoods

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Joined
Mar 5, 2020
Messages
211
Location
Montana
Seating depth can cause horizontal stringing as well. Start with the easiest solution first. Research some other seating depths for your bullet or try loading 3 of each in .010” increments and shoot a few groups
 
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